Jewelry/Sculpture Studio 5 th hour - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Jewelry/Sculpture Studio 5 th hour

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  1. Mrs. Beadleston Jewelry/Sculpture Studio5th hour

  2. Tuesday, Aug. 14 • Jewelry/ Sculpture Studio • nwbeadle@smsd.org, 993-7333 • Expectations, dress code, clean up, storing projects • syllabus • Students in this class will need to buy a lock for their storage cabinet and will need to purchase pliers with cutters. • Make sketchbooks 

  3. Objectives and Course Description • A wide variety of materials (metal, wood, textiles, clay, plaster, stone, • and found/recycled objects) may be utilized in the fabrication of three- • dimensional wearable and non-wearable ornamental objects. This • course will employ additive, subtractive, and experimental construction • processes. Emphasis will be placed on the study of sculptural art • objects, both past and present. • Standard 1: • Apply media, processes, and techniques with sufficient skill in order to convey an idea. • Standard 2: • Use knowledge of the elements of art and the principles of design. • Standard 3: • Critically appraise a work of art including: subject, label information, analysis of the elements & principles, interpretation, and evaluation. • Standard 4: • Identify the function and explore the meaning of specific art objects within varied cultures, times, and places. • Standard 5: • Use appropriate terminology to assess and analyze the composition and content of their own work and the work of others • Standard 6: • Make connections between visual arts and other disciplines.

  4. 4 Pins Project • Objective- Create 4 functioning pins that are unified by a theme. • Students will learn shape vocabulary. • Look at examples:

  5. Which one is the best and why?

  6. Which one of these would you buy and why?

  7. Which one would receive the best grade?

  8. Identify the organic shapes.

  9. Look through magazines, sketch some ideas, come up with an idea/theme. • When you have shown the teacher your sketches, draw out your shapes/layers • How to use a jeweler's saw • Use a jeweler’s saw, scissors, or X-acto to cut out your shapes. Start wrapping shapes with tissue paper, newspaper, or magazines. • Remember craftsmanship.

  10. Aug. 17 • When you have shown the teacher your sketches, draw out your shapes/layers • How to use a jeweler's saw • Use a jeweler’s saw, scissors, or X-acto to cut out your shapes. Start wrapping shapes with tissue paper, newspaper, or magazines.-Demo • Remember craftsmanship.

  11. Aug. 20 • Use a jeweler’s saw, scissors, or X-acto to cut out your shapes. Start wrapping shapes with tissue paper, newspaper, or magazines.- • Remember craftsmanship. • Wire demo • Pins due Friday! We will have a critique. • Everything must be out of lockers today. We are getting new lockers. Then you can put them back. Do you have your pliers today?

  12. Aug. 21 • Students will continue to cut out and wrap shapes. Use wire as embellishment. When you have layers complete, use hot glue to glue the layers together. • Due Friday at the beginning of class

  13. Aug. 22 • Students will continue to cut out and wrap shapes. Use wire as embellishment. When you have layers complete, use hot glue to glue the layers together. • Due Friday at the beginning of class

  14. Aug. 24 • Students will mount their pins on mat board with hot glue. • Get out your assignment sheet to grade. • Class Critique • Students will use the rubric to evaluate their project. • Projects will be displayed in the display cases.

  15. Aug. 27 • Sculpture terms and questions from The Visual Experience page 256-269 • 50 points • Introduce the contour wire project

  16. Aug. 28 • Did you do your homework? • Contour and Blind Contour Powerpoint • This was made by a middle school student. • Contour drawings

  17. Aug. 29 • Wire contour project • Project Sheet and Rubric • Do at least 2 contour drawings (2 different views) of the form you will be sculpting • Demo on twisting wire

  18. Aug. 31 • Create a sculpture using contour lines and stovepipe wire • NO YES

  19. Sept. 4 • Create a sculpture using contour lines and stovepipe wire • SCAD coming tomorrow 5th hour. • Ask me for a pass if you want to go. • www.scad.edu

  20. Sept. 7 • Wire sculpture projects due today! • Use wire cutters to snip off all of the wires sticking out. • Turn in your grading rubric when you’re done. • If you finish early, assist me with cutting metal or cutting paper. • KC Crossroads First Friday tonight!

  21. Sept. 10 • New Project: Copper Pendant • The student will learn how to saw sheet metal copper for the outside and to pierce for the inside shape. • The student will use a jeweler’s saw, flex shaft, bench pins

  22. Sept. 10 • Go over the handouts and cut and glue the instructions to your sketchbook • Practice cutting an exterior shape with the jeweler’s saw.

  23. Sept.11 • Make sure your wire sculpture is done and graded. • Demo: Using the flex shaft to pierce metal. Then how to put the saw blade inside the pierced shape to saw an interior shape. • Practice sawing and piercing on aluminum • Then file the edges

  24. Adobe Illustrator Tutorials • Gustavo and Kristina make an artist’s statement • How to wrap text around shapes • Go to Mrs. Heaton’s room to use Adobe Illustrator to create at least 4 designs using one or more initials from your name, your name and/or a shape or symbol. • 1 ½ inches by 1 ½ inches

  25. Sept. 17 • Size of your copper: 1 ½ inches by 1 ½ inches • Use rubber cement to glue your design onto your copper, then start sawing your outside shape. • Pass back pins and glue pin backs on if you want. • Visitor: KANSAS CITY ART INSTITUTE  • Date: 9/19/2012  • Day: Wednesday  • Time: 10:55am in • Mrs. Terryberry’s room

  26. Sept. 19 • Annealing- a heat treatment wherein a material is altered, causing changes in its properties such as hardness and ductility. It is a process that produces conditions by heating to above the critical temperature, maintaining a suitable temperature, and then cooling. Annealing is used to induce ductility, soften material, relieve internal stresses, refine the structure by making it homogeneous, and improve cold working properties. • Demo-texture and stamping

  27. Sept. 21 • After filing, you need to finish it using emery paper (not sand paper) • You must put your project and the emery paper in water and use small circles to finish it and smooth. • Work from coarse grit (280) to fine grit (400). • Wrap the emery paper around your fingers. • For a super shiny finish, after using emery paper, use the buffer and rouge.

  28. Patina-On metal, patina is a coating of various chemical compounds such as oxides, carbonates, sulfides, or sulfates formed on the surface during exposure to atmospheric elements (oxygen, rain, acid rain, carbon dioxide, sulfur-bearing compounds). Patina also refers to accumulated changes in surface texture and colour that result from normal use of an object such as a coin or a piece of furniture over time.[ • The process of oxidation is a very natural one, and can be observed in any copper material which has been exposed to excessive amounts of water and other moisture. Pennies which have been left in water slowly start to turn the same shade of green which is observed in the Statue of Liberty. The technical term for the shade of green of the statue is called verdigris. This is the term that is used when any copper which has been exposed to the elements begins to oxidize and forms the green coating which is so very familiar on Lady Liberty.

  29. Sept. 24 • For a patina, you may heat with the torch or add chemical patina. To remove heat marks or chemical, use the pickel. • Project due at the end of class Tuesday. • Rio Grande Patina video

  30. Sept. 25 • Demo: Printing screen or lace texture • 1. You will need to anneal the metal you are printing on- clean it and sand it if needed. • 2. Adhere the "texture" to the with rubber cement, let it dry. • 3. Sandwich this between two harder pieces of metal. Set the machine so you can hardly push this sandwich through between the rollers. • 4. Roll the sandwich through. • Pendant Project Due Today! • Have you:? • Pierced a hole for the necklace • Finished the edges with emery • paper? • Buffed or patinized it?

  31. Printing texture using the rolling mill

  32. Sept. 27 • Pin backings attached • Clear Coat for patinas • Attach jump rings and chain. • Class Critique • Turn in your paper to get it graded • Display case

  33. There are 2 ways to patina: heat or chemical • With either process, you need to protect it with clear acrylic top coat.

  34. Assemblage project made from meaningful found objects: Inspired by Steve Mayse, KCAI • View powerpoint

  35. Metalsmithing Safety- Sept. 28 • Go over the worksheet Safety in Metalsmithing • View items that students brought in for assemblage • Demo: Using the band saw • Watch video: The Complete Metalsmith • Think about ways you will use these techniques in your assemblage.

  36. shrinen. A container or receptacle for sacred (dedicated to some person, purpose or object) relics; a reliquary. • assemblagen. A sculptural technique of organizing or composing into a unified whole a group of unrelated and often fragmentary or discarded objects

  37. http://www.clothpaperscissors.com/Mixed-Media-Assemblage-Art/http://www.clothpaperscissors.com/Mixed-Media-Assemblage-Art/ • http://gomakesomething.com/ht/shrines/shrine-making/

  38. Options for assembling: • Cold Joining Techniques: Hot Joining Techniques: • Rubber cement Soldering • Nails Hot Glue • glue • T-pins • Wire • Screws • Tacks • Tape • Rivets • Staple gun • My Pinterest page on personal assemblages

  39. Oct. 9-15 • Students will use hot and cold assemblage techniques to build a personal shrine. • Students will altar the found objects to create a new sculpture. • Students will write an artists’ statement for display. Proofread, then type.

  40. Oct. 16 • College Readiness Presentation, Thursday, October 25 during seminar, in the library. Presentation by two KU librarians emphasizes the research expectations of college faculty and staff (not just KU). It should offer great information for those attending. We will have seating limitations of 100. Students may begin signing up now. • Class Critique with Artists’ Statement • Questions: For how many of you was the art more about choosing the objects and the objects themselves more important than the finished piece? • How many of you just wanted to make something ‘pretty’? • Did creating this object change you in any way? • conceptual art- n. started in the mid 1950’s, art in which the idea behind a particular work, and the means of producing it, are more important than the finished work • Then, display work with the artists’ statement

  41. From the mid-1960s through the mid-1970s Conceptual artists produced works and writings that completely rejected standard ideas of art. Their chief claim - that the articulation of an artistic idea suffices as a work of art - implied that concerns such as aesthetics, expression, skill and marketability were all irrelevant standards by which art was usually judged. So drastically simplified, it might seem to many people that what passes for Conceptual art is not in fact "art" at all, much as Jackson Pollock's "drip" paintings, or Andy Warhol's Brillo Boxes (1964), seemed to contradict what previously had passed for art. • Andy Warhol (American, Pittsburgh 1928? - 1987 New York)Brillo Boxes, 1970 (enlarged refabrication of 1964 project) Commercial silkscreen inks on industrially fabricated plywood box Each: 20 x 20 x 17 in. (50.8 x 50.8 x 43.2 cm)

  42. Oct. 17 • Students will go through terminology and take notes. • Then watch the Complete Metalsmith and complete the worksheet. • Objective: Students will learn basic jewelry making techniques; joining, cutting, forming and surface techniques. • Test over this information.

  43. Definitions • Annealing- a heat treatment wherein a material is altered, causing changes in its properties such as hardness and ductility. It is a process that produces conditions by heating to above the critical temperature, maintaining a suitable temperature, and then cooling. Annealing is used to induce ductility, soften material, relieve internal stresses, refine the structure by making it homogeneous, and improve cold working properties. • Soldering- a process in which two or more metal items are joined together by melting and flowing a filler metal (solder) into the joint, the filler metal having a lower melting point than the work piece. • Annealing and soldering safety is posted

  44. Annealing and Soldering Equipment • pumice • annealing pan copper tongs Flux pickle The purpose of flux is to facilitate the soldering process. The obstacle to a successful solder joint is an impurity at the site of the union, e.g. dirt, oils or oxidation. The impurities can be removed by mechanical cleaning or by chemical means, but the elevated temperatures required to melt the filler metal (the solder) encourages the work piece (and the solder) to re-oxidize.

  45. Jewelry/enameling kiln- fires in minutes to 2000°

  46. Flexible Shaft - this flexible shaft machine is perfect for cleaning, polishing, sanding, drilling and much more. Fully interchangeable unit. Variable speeds up to 22,000RPM.

  47. Soldering Torch Gas Oxygen

  48. Hard Solder • There is easy, medium and hard solder. They differ in the melting temperature. We use hard solder. Put flux on both pieces first, then place the solder on with the brush.

  49. Third Hand and Steel Tweezers • The third hand is used for holding rings or things that might need to stand up while soldering. Use the tweezers for adjusting metal while soldering and picking up hot metal and putting it in the water for quenching.(quench - cool (hot metal) by plunging into cold water.)