eeb 304 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
EEB 304 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
EEB 304

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 35

EEB 304 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 159 Views
  • Uploaded on

Socio-economic Impact of Plants. EEB 304. Syllabus. EEB 304 SOCIO-ECONOMIC IMPACT OF PLANTS SPRING SEMESTER 2011 Instructor: Dr. Ed Schilling Office: 323 Hesler, 974-2256 e-mail : eschilling@utk.edu

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'EEB 304' - hachi


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
syllabus
Syllabus

EEB 304 SOCIO-ECONOMIC IMPACT OF PLANTS SPRING SEMESTER 2011

Instructor: Dr. Ed Schilling Office: 323 Hesler, 974-2256 e-mail: eschilling@utk.edu

Class Time: Tuesday-Thursday 9:40-10:55 Place: 304 Hesler Biology Building

Textbook:Economic Botany, third edition. B. B. Simpson and M. C. Ogorzaly (McGraw-Hill)

Note – a copy of the text has been placed on reserve at the main library

slide4

How to Succeed in EEB 304

1. Read text assignment. Read it before class.

slide5

How to Succeed in EEB 304

  • Read text assignment. Read it before class.
  • Attend class. Pay attention. Take notes on lectures. Use opportunity to learn material, ask questions if unclear.
slide6

How to Succeed in EEB 304

  • Read text assignment. Read it before class.
  • Attend class. Pay attention. Take notes on lectures. Use opportunity to learn material, ask questions if unclear.
  • Use powerpoint slides on class web page to review. For many lectures there will be some explanatory text with some or all of the slides – this is meant to supplement the text and lectures, not replace them.
slide7

How to Succeed in EEB 304

  • Read text assignment. Read it before class.
  • Attend class. Pay attention. Take notes on lectures. Use opportunity to learn material, ask questions if unclear.
  • Use powerpoint slides on class web page to review. For many lectures there will be some explanatory text with some or all of the slides – this is meant to supplement the text and lectures, not replace them.
  • Make a list, and study, unfamiliar terms. There will probably be many – in the process of learning them, you will learn much of the course material..
human population growth
Human Population Growth
  • Billions Time (Years)
  • 1 >60,000
  • 2 123
  • 3 33
  • 4 14
  • 5 13
  • 6 11
dynamics of world population growth
Dynamics of World Population Growth

Assignment: Go to the following web site:

http://opr.princeton.edu/popclock/

Record the date and time of your visit, and write down the estimate of human world population at that moment. E-mail the results, or alternatively turn in a hard copy to class. Due 1/18.

slide18

World Grain Production vs. Consumption – Last 46 Years

A primary input – China heads toward being a grain importer

economic impact of plants
Economic Impact of Plants
  • Foods
  • Beverages
  • Fuels
  • Building materials
  • Clothing
  • Chemicals
  • Drugs
  • Esthetics
what is a plant
What is a plant?

Traditional View of Biology: Animals and Plants

what is a plant1
What is a plant?

Traditional View of Biology: Animals and Plants

Problem: Microscopic Organisms (Bacteria, Fungi, Algae)

what is a plant2
What is a plant?

Traditional View of Biology: Animals and Plants

Problem: Microscopic Organisms (Bacteria, Fungi, Algae)

Complication:

Endosymbiotic origin of organelles (Lynn Margulis)

Membrane-bound structures in eukaryotic cells are derived from formerly free-living organisms that have become intimately symbiotic

what is a plant3
What is a plant?

Traditional View of Biology: Animals and Plants

Problem: Microscopic Organisms (Bacteria, Fungi, Algae)

Complication:

Endosymbiotic origin of organelles (Lynn Margulis)

Membrane-bound structures in eukaryotic cells are derived from formerly free-living organisms that have become intimately symbiotic

  • Further Information: molecular phylogenetic information
  • Confirming evidence for endosymbiotic theory
what is a plant4
What is a plant?

Traditional View of Biology: Animals and Plants

Problem: Microscopic Organisms (Bacteria, Fungi, Algae)

Complication:

Endosymbiotic origin of organelles (Lynn Margulis)

Membrane-bound structures in eukaryotic cells are derived from formerly free-living organisms that have become intimately symbiotic

  • Further Information: molecular phylogenetic information
  • Confirming evidence for endosymbiotic theory
  • Suggestion that life split early into at least 3 major lineages
what is a plant5
What is a plant?

Traditional View of Biology: Animals and Plants

Problem: Microscopic Organisms (Bacteria, Fungi, Algae)

Complication:

Endosymbiotic origin of organelles (Lynn Margulis)

Membrane-bound structures in eukaryotic cells are derived from formerly free-living organisms that have become intimately symbiotic

  • Further Information: molecular phylogenetic information
  • Confirming evidence for endosymbiotic theory
  • Suggestion that life split early into at least 3 major lineages

Current Paradigm is 5 kingdom model:

Monera; Protoctista; Fungi, Animalia, Plantae

what is a plant6
What is a Plant?
  • Eukaryotic
  • Chloroplasts present
  • Cell wall with cellulose
  • Autotrophic
what is a plant7
What is a Plant?
  • Eukaryotic
  • Chloroplasts present
  • Cell wall with cellulose
  • Autotrophic
  • Life Cycle with an alternation of generations
what are plants
What are Plants?
  • Eukaryotic
  • Chloroplasts present
  • Cell wall with cellulose
  • Autotrophic
  • Life Cycle with an alternation of generations
mystery plant
Mystery Plant

- This plant is a tropical tree.

mystery plant1
Mystery Plant

- This plant is a tropical tree.

- The sole source of the product originally was harvested from plants occurring in the wild.

mystery plant2
Mystery Plant

- This plant is a tropical tree.

- The sole source of the product originally was harvested from plants occurring in the wild

- Seeds of the plant were taken (or smuggled?) out of the country in a diplomatic pouch and used to establish plantations elsewhere

mystery plant3
Mystery Plant

- This plant is a tropical tree.

- The sole source of the product originally was harvested from plants occurring in the wild

- Seeds of the plant were taken (or smuggled?) out of the country in a diplomatic pouch and used to establish plantations elsewhere

- The product became widely useful only after it was discovered accidentally how to alter its chemical and physical properties.

mystery plant4
Mystery Plant

- This plant is a tropical tree.

- The sole source of the product originally was harvested from plants occurring in the wild

- Seeds of the plant were taken (or smuggled?) out of the country in a diplomatic pouch and used to establish plantations elsewhere

- The product became widely useful only after it was discovered accidentally how to alter its chemical and physical properties.

  • What is the plant?
  • What is its native country?
  • What country was responsible for smuggling it?
  • In what century did this occur?
slide34

“Stolen” by British

Hevea brasiliensis

“Para Rubber”

Native to Brazil  taken to Indonesia in 19th century

Native

Grown