slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Collie Salmon October 4, 2008 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Collie Salmon October 4, 2008

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 34

Collie Salmon October 4, 2008 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 62 Views
  • Uploaded on

Serious Injuries. Collie Salmon October 4, 2008. Purpose. Your authority to deal with serious injuries How to identify a serious injury What to do, and what not to do when handling a serious injury. Is this a serious Injury?. Is this a serious Injury?. Is this a serious Injury?.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Collie Salmon October 4, 2008' - gwylan


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Serious Injuries

Collie Salmon October 4, 2008

purpose

Purpose

Your authority to deal with serious injuries

How to identify a serious injury

What to do, and what not to do when handling a serious injury

is this a serious injury3

Is this a serious Injury?

Will be different for different ages: From under 8 to Over 35’s

group workshop

INSTRUCTIONS

Group Workshop

  • Group should breakout into small groups and answer the questions presented;
  • Write down your answers to each question;
  • Elect a speaker.

Time: 13 minutes

group workshop questions

Group WorkshopQUESTIONS

  • What authority does the referee have when dealing with injured players?
  • Can the Referee / Assistant Referee be held liable for an injured player?
  • Define a serious injury (give examples)?
  • What should you do if you determine the injury to be serious?

Time: 13 minutes

referee s authority under the lotg

Referee’s Authority under the LOTG

Law 5 states that the Referee has the authority to:

“Stop the match if, in his opinion, a player is seriously injured and ensures he is removed from the field of play. An injured player may only return to the field of play after the match has been restarted.”

fifa law 5 decision 1

FIFA Law 5Decision 1

“A referee (or AR) is not held liable for any kind of injury suffered by a player, spectator or official.”

authority of the referee

Authority of the Referee

Control

The

Situation

3 main serious injuries

3 Main Serious Injuries

Head (concussion), back / neck Injury

Broken leg / ankle / arm

Large cut (bleeding)

how to recognize a serious injury

How to recognize a serious Injury

See the injury

Sound of the injury

Actions of the injured player

Actions of the other players

definition of a serious injury

Definition of a serious Injury

If the player sincerely demonstrates serious physical distress due to an injury to his/her person

Source: Collie Salmon

Will be different for different ages: From under 8 to Over 35’s

examples of a serious injury

Examples of a Serious Injury

becomes unconscious;

has trouble breathing (not normal);

has swallowed his/her tongue;

has chest pain or pressure;

is bleeding severely;

has pressure or pain in the abdomen that does not go away;

examples of a serious injury1

Examples of a Serious Injury

is vomiting or passing blood;

has seizures, a severe headache, or slurred speech or blurred vision;

has possible broken bones;

disfigurement (significant scarring or burns);

spinal cord injuries;

heart attack;

has injuries to the head, neck, or back;

signs and symptoms of fractured bones

Signs and Symptoms of Fractured Bones

pale, cool, clammy skin

rapid, weak pulse

pain at the site

Tenderness

loss of power to limb

associated wound and blood loss

associated organ damage

Nausea

Deformity

Crepitus (peculiar crackling, crinkly under skin)

These are examples from the English F.A.

transmission of infectious diseases

Transmission of Infectious Diseases

Referees are not responsible for administering treatment,

Advise against dirty water from a bucket being used to treat an injury - particularly if the injury is an open wound.

Some participants may have infectious diseases including HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis B (blood borne pathogens).

Contaminated towels, dressings, and other articles containing body fluids should be properly disposed of or disinfected

These are examples from the English F.A.

damaged ligaments

Damaged ligaments

Damaged ligaments can be more serious than a broken bone;

Great care must be taken to isolate the injury;

Moving unsupported and improperly bandaged injuries can have a devastating effect in causing further injury and pain to the injured player;

Where serious neck or back injuries are suspected, any movement by untrained hands has the greatest consequences. The player should be immobilized pending arrival of medical personnel.

These are examples from the English F.A.

head injuries

Head Injuries

Stop the game immediately for head injuries

why is a head injury so serious

Why is a head injury so serious?

A head injury may cause serious injury to the brain, even when there is no visible bleeding or injury visible on the outside of the skull.

The impact of a hard blow to the head may jar or shake the brain within the skull (closed head injury).

The rapid movement of the brain within the skull can cause bruising, swelling, or tearing of the brain tissue. It can also stretch, pull apart, or tear nerves or blood vessels within or around the brain.

These are examples from the English F.A.

why is a head injury so serious1

Why is a head injury so serious?

Head injuries can sometimes be more complex when players have been taking alcohol or drugs, which can make injury evaluation and recognition difficult. Do not assume any altered behaviour is only from alcohol or drug use.

Where serious head, neck or back injuries are suspected, any movement by untrained hands has the greatest consequences. The player should be immobilized pending arrival of medical personnel.

These are examples from the English F.A.

what do you do player

What do you do (player)?

Stop play immediately (blow whistle)

Do NOT touch player – Speak to player in a calming tone

Assess injury for seriousness

Call for assistance: coach/team medic.

Call for ambulance if necessary (do not move player if unsure of seriousness of injury)

Arrange for the player to be removed from the field safely

what do you do technical

What do you do (technical)?

Remember where the ball was last

Note time of stoppage (Stop watch?)

Card player before he/she leaves the field

Restart with a dropped ball if the game was stopped due to the injury

Allow player to return only after play has restarted

what do you do technical1

What do you do (technical)?

Add (lost) time to the end of the half

Allow substitution, if necessary

Write a report if incident is serious and if your decision is being questioned (Discuss with more senior referee before submitting)

s e r i o u s

S.E.R.I.O.U.S.

Serious? (The first consideration is to decide if an injury is serious or not.)

Evaluate? (Evaluate each injury situation as it arises. Does play need to be stopped?)

Race. (Sprinting to the scene of the injury).

Inspect. (Taking up a position that allows inspection of the injury and monitoring the remaining players).

Organise. (Taking charge, positioning andseeking medical assistance if it is required).

Usher. (Overseeing the safe removal of injured players).

Start. (Starting the game again after the injury has been seen to).

Source: English Referee Association

safety first

Safety First

Referees should always err on the side of safety

You will not be criticized for stopping play to inspect a player for an injury

osa insurance

OSA Insurance

2. How does this coverage work in terms of referee assault?

Accident Coverage

The Accident Policy excludes injuries sustained from fighting but does provide coverage if injury is caused by an assault against the referee during a sanctioned game.

Liability Coverage

The Liability policy is there to defend if an injured party purses compensation as a result of alleged/proven negligence against an individual – in this case a referee. So, yes only provides coverage if the ref is sued (not if the ref tries to sue)

Source: OSA Referee Insurance FAQ Document

summary

Summary

You have the authority to stop the game

Study and know all the things you should do and what you should not do to ensure the player is dealt with safely

Study Law 5 and Law 5 instructions for referees

Review S.E.R.I.O.U.S. article from the English Referee Association

Inform authorities if necessary

resources

Resources

Head Gear: http://www.safety-council.org/info/sport/soccer-ls.html

http://www.footballreferee.org/better_refereeing_injury.php

http://corshamref.org.uk/newsletter/news06nov.htm

http://corshamref.org.uk/serious.htm

http://corshamref.org.uk/emergen.htm

OSA Insurance: www.hkmb.com/osa