Dr. Hank Kelly hkelly@ohiochristian (740) 420-5924 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Dr. Hank Kelly hkelly@ohiochristian (740) 420-5924 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Dr. Hank Kelly hkelly@ohiochristian (740) 420-5924

play fullscreen
1 / 24
Dr. Hank Kelly hkelly@ohiochristian (740) 420-5924
109 Views
Download Presentation
gunnar
Download Presentation

Dr. Hank Kelly hkelly@ohiochristian (740) 420-5924

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Comparison of Student Evaluations of Teaching Between Online and Face-to-Face Courses Dr. Hank Kelly hkelly@ohiochristian.edu (740) 420-5924

  2. Research Question What are the differences in student evaluations of teaching (SET) between online and face-to-face (F2F) courses as evidenced by a thematic analysis of open-ended questions?

  3. Purpose Determine if a SET bias exists (i.e., delivery method affects evaluation independent of instructional effectiveness)

  4. Need • SET need to be reliable, valid, and accurate because they are frequently used for high-stakes summative evaluation decisions about faculty: promotion, tenure, merit pay

  5. Need • Literature indicates possible SET bias against online instruction compared to F2F instruction • Lower SET for online compared to F2F instruction but no differences in learning • No difference in SET between online and F2F instruction but higher learning in online class • Lower SET for online education (but no assessment of learning)

  6. Need • If such a bias exists, SET of online courses cannot be equitably compared with those of F2F courses • Online education is increasing • Forces driving higher education to consider quality and satisfaction • Increased competition • Growing dissatisfaction with higher education in America and demand for accountability

  7. Setting • Comprehensive university; offers bachelor’s, master’s, doctorate, and first professional degrees; only 7% undergraduate • Located in southern US • 3,443 enrollment • Majority of students are women (56%), enrolled part time (58%), and aged 25 and above (88%)

  8. Methodology Content analysis, using qualitative research techniques, of responses to open-ended questions in SET of online and F2F courses • Thematic analysis according to two sets of categories: appraisal and topical (Braskamp et al., 1981; Rovai et al., 2006) • Evaluation of frequency counts • Detailed description

  9. Appraisal Categories • Praise • Constructive criticism • Negative criticism

  10. Instructor Attitude Rapport Person Knowledgeable Stimulation Ability Preparedness Helpfulness Teacher overall Course Organization Content Materials Workload Lecture Discussion Assignments Overall course Grading Grading fairness Grading timeliness Feedback quantity/quality Topical Themes & Categories

  11. Population, Sample, & Participation • Taught during academic year 2004-05 • 41 instructors throughout university: one online and one F2F section of same course • 866 students took the 82 class sections: 43% F2F, 57% online • 534 completed SET: 62% overall response rate, 60% F2F, 63% online • 1,742 distinct text segments: 43% F2F, 57% online

  12. Findings - Thematic Analysis • Praise: 52% of text segments • Constructive criticism: 29% • Negative criticism: 19% • No significant difference between appraisal categories by delivery method, Pearson c2(2, N=1,742) = 1.49, p = .47

  13. Findings - Thematic Analysis • Course theme: 80% of text segments • Instructor theme: 15% • Grading theme: 5% • Significant difference between topical themes by delivery method, c2(2, N=1,742) = 11.06, p < .01 • Significant difference between topical categories by delivery method, c2(19, N=1,742) = 38.31, p < .01

  14. Findings - Thematic Analysis • Greater proportion of text segments (F2F): • In instructor theme • Containing praise in instructor theme • In person and knowledgeable categories • Containing praise in person category • Greater proportion of text segments (Online): • In course theme • Containing praise in course theme • In materials category • Containing praise in organization and materials categories

  15. Findings - % of Text Segments by Theme and Delivery Method F = F2F O = Online

  16. Findings - % of Text Segments by Category and Delivery Method F = F2F O = Online

  17. Findings - MANOVA Multivariate analysis of variance of responses to closed-ended questions • For comparison: quantitative analysis is common in literature • Dependent variables (for each class): • Mean overall evaluation of instructor • Mean overall evaluation of course • Independent variable: delivery method (2 levels: online and F2F)

  18. Findings - MANOVA • No significant difference between overall evaluations of instructor and course by delivery method, Pillai’s Trace = .03, F(2,79)=1.15, p = .32 • MANOVA appropriate because of intercorrelation between dependent variables (r = .80)

  19. Study Limitations • Self reported data, subject to reporting bias • Subject to nonresponse bias • No external validation of instructional effectiveness such as student learning; only perceived learning reported • Primarily graduate students • Only online distance education students • Only one institution studied

  20. Implications for Future Research • Interview participants • Additional classes, instructors, years, institutions • Differences in frequency of responses by factors (e.g., adjunct vs. full-time faculty, male vs. female student, student age, academic discipline) • Online learning process/techniques to create optimum online learning experience

  21. Implications for Practice • Online students value organization: course design should provide clear guide through learning activities(Palloff & Pratt, 2001) • Online students value instructional materials: carefully select; online instructors are no longer considered “repository of knowledge”(Sherry & Wilson, 1997)

  22. Implications for Practice • Differences between delivery methods: faculty role changes (Coppola et al., 2002), change instructional design and delivery, need for faculty training and instructional support (Howell, Saba, Lindsay, & Williams, 2004) • Establish clear grading criteria/standards (rubrics); apply equally to everyone (Walvoord & Anderson, 1998)

  23. Implications for Practice • SET is reliable, valid, and useful for improving instructional effectiveness • Responses to open-ended questions address wider range of instructional dimensions than closed-ended questions • Open-ended questions should try to elicit responses in all three topical themes: instructor, course, and grading

  24. More Details Available Kelly, H. F. (2007). A comparison of student evaluations of teaching between online and face-to-face courses. ProQuest Digital Dissertations (AAT 3213072). Kelly, H. F., Ponton, M. K., & Rovai, A. P. (2007). A comparison of student evaluations of teaching between online and face-to-face courses. The Internet and Higher Education, 10(2), 89-101.