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Caribbean Tropical Fish 4-04-10. Four-eyed Fish, Anableps. Trinidad November 2009 Photo by Eliana Ardila. Anableps skim the surface and their eyes see above and below. Queen Angelfish. French Angelfish. Gray Angelfish. Rock Beauty. Barracuda.

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Caribbean Tropical Fish 4-04-10


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    Presentation Transcript
    1. Caribbean Tropical Fish4-04-10

    2. Four-eyed Fish, Anableps Trinidad November 2009 Photo by Eliana Ardila

    3. Anableps skim the surface and their eyes see above and below.

    4. Queen Angelfish

    5. French Angelfish

    6. Gray Angelfish

    7. Rock Beauty

    8. Barracuda

    9. Jack the Ripper, the five foot welcome committee at Blue Hole.

    10. Jack the Ripper under our boat at Blue Hole.

    11. Revenge! Dinner!

    12. Mallory Blakeslee and her ‘Cudda 2005

    13. Mike Joines & his ‘Cuddas By Harold Baquet

    14. Blackcap Basslet

    15. Fairy Basslet

    16. Batfish, a species we see while snorkeling in the mangroves of Turneffe Atoll.

    17. Spotted Burrfish

    18. Web Burrfish

    19. Spiney Puffer from Natural History Magazine

    20. A spiney little ball. from Natural History Magazine

    21. How do they puff up? It’s the stomach. From Natural History Magazine

    22. Bandtail Puffer

    23. Toadfish

    24. Scorpionfish, with poison glands, cryptically resting in Tobago.

    25. Banded Butterflyfish

    26. Foureyed Butterflyfish

    27. Spotfin Butterflyfish

    28. Cyanae

    29. Blue Chromis

    30. Brown Chromis

    31. Coney: yellow phase (l) & bicolor phase (r)

    32. Chub

    33. Chub under the boat at The Aquarium, a favorite dive site on Long Caye, Belize.

    34. Barjack

    35. Melissa Kaintz (02) with an edible barjack.

    36. Jack Crevelle

    37. Horse-eye Jack – note the large eye

    38. King Mackerel – called a King Fish in Belize.

    39. Patty Richards (02) with her King Fish.

    40. We’ll have a good meal soon!

    41. Spanish Mackerel

    42. Wahoo are another relative of the King Fish.

    43. Fish have a lateral line for sensing the environment, and the shape of the line is often used to identify fish.

    44. Yellowfin Tuna, one of the fastest fishes in the sea.

    45. Fast moving fish (a King Mackerel in this case) often have very red, highly vascularized tissue near the center of the body.

    46. High Speed Tails

    47. Gill Rakers in Bonita

    48. Bicolor Damselfish adult

    49. Bicolor Damselfish juvenile

    50. Cocoa Damselfish