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Binary Number System

Binary Number System

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Binary Number System

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  1. Binary Number System • Why Study? • Necessary for: • Digital Design • Design Debug and Verification • Troubleshooting Circuits • Lab and field instruments • Its cousin, Boolean Algebra

  2. Number Systems and Codes • Decimal or Human Number System • Binary Number System • Hexadecimal Number System • Octal Number System

  3. Decimal Number System • Ten unique numbers 0,1..9 • Combination of digits • Positional Number System • 275 = 2 x 102 + 7 x 101 + 5 x 100 • Base or Radix 10 • Weight: powers of 10 1, 10, 100, 1000 ….

  4. Representing Fractions • Fractions can be represented in decimal number system in a similar manner = 3 x 102 + 8 x 101 + 2 x 100 + 9 x 10-1 + 1 x 10-2 = 300 + 80 + 2 + 0.9 + 0.01 = 382.91

  5. Binary Number System • Two unique numbers 0 and 1 • Base – 2 • A binary digit is a bit • Combination of bits to represent larger values • In computer work, some special titles: 210 – K (kilo) 220 – M (mega) 230 – G (giga)

  6. Binary Number System

  7. Combination of Binary Bits • Combination of Bits • 100112 = 1910 = (1 x 24) + (0 x 23) + (0 x 22) + (1 x 21) + (1 x 20) = (1 x 16) + (0 x 8) + (0 x 4) + (1 x 2) + (1 x 1) = 16 + 0 + 0 + 2 + 1 = 1910

  8. Fractions in Binary • Fractions in Binary • 1011.1012 = 11.625 = (1 x 23) + (0 x 22) + (1 x 21) + (1 x 20) + (1 x 2-1) + (0 x 2-2) + (1 x 2-3) = (1 x 8) + (0 x 4) + (1 x 2) + (1 x 1) + (1 x 1/2) + (0 x 1/4) + (1 x 1/8) = 8 + 0 + 2 + 1 + 0.5 + 0 + 0.125 = 11.62510 • Floating Point Notations (to be discussed later)

  9. Binary to Decimal Conversion • Sum-of-Weights • Add weights for non-zero terms • Drop zero terms

  10. Binary to Decimal Conversion • Example 1 • 101012 = (1 x 24) + (0 x 23) + (1 x 22) + (0 x 21) + (1 x 20) = 24 + 22 + 20 = 16 + 4 + 1 = 2110

  11. Binary to Decimal Conversion • Example 2 • 1010.1012 = 8 + 2 + 1/2 + 1/8 = 10 + 5/8 = 10.62510

  12. Decimal to Binary Conversion • Sum-of-Weights method used in reverse • Highest binary weight less than the decimal number • Subsequent smaller weights that add up to decimal number • Repeated division by 2 • Systematic • Works for numbers of any length

  13. Decimal to Binary ConversionRepeated Division Method

  14. Decimal-Binary Fraction Conversion • Repeated multiplication by 2  STOP when 0 reached

  15. Binary Arithmetic • Binary Addition • Binary Subtraction • Binary Multiplication • Binary Division

  16. Binary Addition • Four Basic Rules

  17. Binary Addition Example

  18. Binary Subtraction • Four Basic Rules

  19. Binary Subtraction Example

  20. Binary Multiplication • Four Basic rules

  21. Binary Multiplication Example 1101 (13d) x 101 (5d) 1st partial product 1101 2nd partial product 0000 3rd partial product + 1101 Product 1000001 (65d)

  22. Binary Division Example • Same rules as decimal division 10 2 101 | 1101 5 | 13 101 10 011 000___ 11 3

  23. Division/Multiplication by Shifting • In Decimal a number shifted one place to the right is the same as divide by 10. e.g. 29  2.9 • Likewise, a number shifted left is multiply by 10. e.g. 13  130 • In Binary each right or left shift accomplishes divide or multiply by 2. • Right sh: 111012 (29d)  1110.12 (14.5d) • Left sh: 1101 (13d) -> 11010 (26d)  110100 (52d )

  24. Negative Number Representation • 3 Options • Sign-magnitude • One’s Complement • Two’s Complement  used in computers and most digital systems

  25. Sign-magnitude Representation • Signed Binary Numbers • Most significant bit represents sign • MSB of 0 => positive number; MSB of 1 => negative number • Problem • Representing 0 (e.g. +0 0000 and -0 1000) • Not computation friendly Sign Magnitude Form 1101 -5 0010 +2 1111 -7!!

  26. 1’s & 2’s Complement Form Representation • 1’s complement form • Derived by inverting all bits • 2’s complement form • Derived by adding 1 to 1’s complement Binary number 00001101 (13d) 1’s complement 11110010 (-13d) + 1 2’s complement 11110011 (-13d)

  27. Signed Number Example • +92  01011100 • In sign-magnitude form -92 11011100 • In 1’s complement form -92  10100011 • In 2’s complement form -92  10100100 Shortcut to form 2’s complement: • Do not flip any bits to the right of and including the first “1” • Flip all bits to the left of the first “1”

  28. Decimal Value of Signed Numbers • Sign-magnitude form • Sum the weights in all magnitude bit positions where there are 1s • Sign is determined by examination of the sign bit 110111 - (16 + 4 + 2 + 1) -23d • 1’s Complement form • Assign a negative value to the weight of the sign bit • Sum the weights in all bit positions, where there are 1s • Add 1 to the result 100110 (-32 +4 +2) +1 -25d • 2’s Complement form • Assign a negative value to the weight of sign bit • Sum the weights in all bit positions, where there are 1s 110111 (-32 +16 + 4 +2 + 1) -9d

  29. Decimal Value of Signed Numbers Alternate Method • 1’s Complement form • Convert Negative Number to Positive • Attach –ve sign bit 100110 => 011001 (-ve) 25d • 2’s Complement form • Convert Negative Number to Positive • Attach –ve sign bit 110111 => 001001 (-ve) 9d

  30. Range of Binary Numbers • Unsigned Numbers Total combos for “n” binary bits = 2n Range: 0 … + (2n -1) • Sign Magnitude Form - (2n-1 -1)… + (2n-1 -1) • 2’s Complement Form - (2n-1)… + (2n-1 -1)

  31. Important Info about 2’s Comp #s • 2’s complement representation is for negative numbers only • Before representing 2’s complement numbers, ensure it can fit in the given range of bits - e.g for n-bit numbers range is: - (2n-1)… + (2n-1 -1) • Overflow occurs only when MSB changes contrary to result expectation, otherwise discard carry.

  32. Arithmetic Operations w/ Signed Numbers • Addition • straightforward as we shall see • Subtraction • Change sign of Subtrahend and Add • Multiplication • Shift and add each partial product term • Division • Repetitively subtract Divisor from Dividend – but subtraction is again addition

  33. Addition with 2’s Complement 1011 -5 0101 +5 0010 +21110 -2 1101 -3 0011 +3 1011 -5 0101 +5 1110 -20010 +2 1 1001 -7 0111 +7  Discard any final carry bit

  34. Subtraction with 2’s Complement 01011001 89 01011001 89 - 00101101 45 + 11010011 -45 ???????? ?? 1 00101100 44  Discard any final carry bit

  35. Overflows • Overflow conditions • Indicated by an incorrect sign bit • There is a carry into the sign bit which produces an overflow condition • Can occur only when both numbers are positive or both numbers are negative 01111101 (+125d) 00111010 (+58d) 10110111 (+183d)

  36. Floating Point Numbers • To represent very large/very small integers • Numbers that have both integer and fractional parts • A Floating point number consists of two parts plus a sign • Exponent: Number of places that the binary point is to be moved (power of 2) • Mantissa; represents the magnitude of the number • A format is defined by ANSI/IEEE 754 • Single precision, double precision and extended precision

  37. S Biased Exp 10001011 10110000011100000000000 0 Floating Point Numbers • Single Precision Floating Point Binary Number • +11011000001112 +1.101100000111 x 212(Normalized form) S = 0 Biased Exponent = 10001011 (127 + 12 = 139) Mantissa = 10110000011100000000000 (hidden 1) Mantissa

  38. 10100000000000000000000 0 10000100 01011000000000000000000 1 00000001 00000000000000000000000 0 00000000 00000000000000000000000 0 11111111 Floating Point Numbers +1.101 x 25 -1.01011 x 2-126 0 ∞

  39. Need for Hexadecimal Number System • Long binary numbers are difficult to read and write; easy to transpose or drop a bit • Most digital systems process binary data in groups that are multiples of four bits -> easy to convert • Base 16 number system • Ten digits and six alphabetic characters • 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, A, B, C, D, E, F

  40. Hexadecimal Number System • Counting in Hexadecimal • Once we get to F, we start over with another column and continue

  41. Hexadecimal Number System • Counting in Hexadecimal

  42. Hexadecimal Number System • Binary to Hexadecimal Conversion • Starting from the LSB, replace each 4-bit group with the equivalent hexadecimal symbol 1101 0110 1011 1001 0110 D 6 B 9 6 • Hexadecimal to binary conversion • Replace each hexadecimal digit with appropriate four bits F D 1 3 1111 1101 0001 0011

  43. Hexadecimal Number System • Hexadecimal-to-Decimal Conversion • Sum-of-Weights Method CA02h = (C x 163) + (A x 162) + (0 x 161) + (2 x 160) = (12 x 163) + (10 x 162) + (0 x 161) + (2 x 160) = (12 x 4096) + (10 x 256) + (0 x 16) + (2 x 1) = 49152 + 2560 + 0 + 2 = 51714

  44. Hexadecimal Number System • Decimal to Hexadecimal Conversion • Repeated Division-by-16 method  Result: 35Bh STOP when 0 reached

  45. Hexadecimal Number System • Hexadecimal Addition • In any given column, think of two hexadecimal digits in terms of their decimal values • Example Carry 1 2 A C 6 6+5=11d Bh + 9 2 B 5 C+B=23d 17h B D7 B A+2+1=13d Dh 2+9=11d Bh

  46. Hexadecimal Number System • Hexadecimal Subtraction • Example Borrow 111 92B5 21-6=15d Fh - 2AC6 26-C=14d Eh 67EF 17-A=7d 7h 8-2=6d 6h

  47. Octal Numbers • Composed of eight digits 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7 • To count above 7, begin another column and start over

  48. Octal Numbers • Counting in Octal

  49. Octal Numbers • Binary-to-Octal Conversion • Start with the right most group of three bits • Moving from right to left convert each 3-bit group to the equivalent octal digit • For the left most group, add zeros to complete the group if required • Example 11010110101110010110 011 010 110 101 110 010 110 3 2 6 5 6 2 6

  50. Octal Numbers • Octal-to-Binary Conversion • Each octal digit can be represented by a 3-bit binary # 17268 001 111 010 110 • Octal-to-Decimal Conversion • Sum-of-Weights method 40338 (4 x 83) + (0 x 82) + (3 x 81) + (3 x 80) (4 x 512) + (0 x 64) + (3 x 8) + (3 x 1) 2048 + 0 + 24 + 3 2075