advancing multicultural health research in ontario and canada the challenge for older arrivals n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Kenise Murphy Kilbride, Ph.D. Adjunct Professor and Professor Emerita PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Kenise Murphy Kilbride, Ph.D. Adjunct Professor and Professor Emerita

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 12

Kenise Murphy Kilbride, Ph.D. Adjunct Professor and Professor Emerita - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 107 Views
  • Uploaded on

 Advancing Multicultural Health Research  in Ontario and Canada: The Challenge for Older Arrivals. Kenise Murphy Kilbride, Ph.D. Adjunct Professor and Professor Emerita School of Early Childhood Education Yeates School of Graduate Studies Ryerson University  March 17, 2012 .

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

Kenise Murphy Kilbride, Ph.D. Adjunct Professor and Professor Emerita


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
advancing multicultural health research in ontario and canada the challenge for older arrivals

Advancing Multicultural Health Research  in Ontario and Canada:The Challenge for Older Arrivals

Kenise Murphy Kilbride, Ph.D.

Adjunct Professor and Professor Emerita

School of Early Childhood Education

Yeates School of Graduate Studies

Ryerson University

 March 17, 2012 

the study funded by citizenship and immigration canada 2009 2011 was entitled listening to seniors
The study, funded by Citizenship and Immigration Canada (2009-2011), was entitled “Listening to Seniors”.

Research base:

  • 13 key informant service providers in individual interviews
  • 120+ senior immigrant women over 50 (arrived in past 10 years) in focus groups
  • 72 immigrant men over 55 (arrived in past 10 years) in individual interviews
  • 157 family members (sponsored a senior in past 10 years) in focus groups
languages and locations
Languages and Locations

12 languages (based on Ontario migration data 1996-2006)

  • Arabic, Cantonese, Farsi, Gujarati, Korean, Mandarin, Punjabi, Russian, Spanish, Tagalog, Tamil, and Urdu 

Locations

  • 10 larger cities: Windsor, London, Kitchener, Niagara/St. Catharines, Ottawa, Hamilton, Brampton, Richmond Hill, Markham, and Toronto
  • 3 smaller cities: Thunder Bay, Chatham/Kent, and Brantford.
principal findings relating to health
Principal findings relating to health
  • Like other immigrants, older immigrants had first passed a physical examination; they were healthy when they arrived.
  • Like many other immigrants, the health of many deteriorated after arrival.
  • They do not attribute this decline to old age but rather to the challenges they associate with settlement, particularly but not exclusively to isolation which leads to loneliness and finally depression.
  • Women are more outspoken about this than men but they are more concerned about their husband’s depression, rather than their own.
  • While the women are most concerned about depression itself, they claim it is also the principal cause of the physical ailments that both men and women suffer from.
  • An almost equally important cause of any ill health is the financial stress they find themselves under here, and their loss of status through unemployment, as opposed to the financial security and status most had “back home.”
but they had strong recommendations as to how to prevent this decline in health
BUT:They had strong recommendations as to how to prevent this decline in health.

The absence of doctors and nurses who speak their language? --Make it easier for the doctors from their home countries to practice here.

Implications for OMHARN research?

  • Identify best practices in medical credential recognition and residency, and make a very strong, evidence-based case for implementing them throughout the province.
  • Identify and evaluate cases of foreign-trained doctors who work as assistants with Canadian physicians as soon as their language skills permit good communication with the physician.
slide6

Isolation and depression? –Programs designed (and run) by seniors for seniors.

Implications for OMHARN research?

  • Identify and evaluate excellent programs (for seniors designed and run by seniors) for their contribution to seniors’ mental health
  • Identify other programs and determine how they could become excellent programs for seniors designed and run by seniors
  • Conduct focus groups with seniors to determine what programs could and should be implemented to improve their mental health
  • Identify ways to fund such programs
slide7

Isolation and depression? –Provide genuinely accessible transportation

Implications for OMHARN research?

  • Identify and evaluate existing transportation programs for seniors, how they are funded, what the impacts are on their health, and what it would take to replicate them
  • Conduct focus groups with seniors to determine what is needed to make transportation genuinely accessible for them, and how they think this would affect their health
  • Identify ways to fund such programs
  • Study alternative ways to locate such programs, to reduce the need for transportation
slide8

Besides ending their isolation, what else is needed to prevent their depression?

--The bare minimum for successful settlement and integration, and for the good health that must underlie a successful integration, is:

  • English language proficiency for virtually all
  • Employment for those who seek it
  • Adequate financial support
slide9
Good English is needed for good health? --Provide genuine access to language classes that are appropriate for seniors:
  • in local schools that are within walking distance, and during the day when their grandchildren are in class
  • in the high-rises where so many of them live
  • with bilingual teachers or teachers’ aides so someone can tell them what the teacher is saying
  • in conversational style for those who need a more informal approach; with formal grammar and syntax for those seeking professional English

Implications for OMHARN research?

  • Conduct studies to compare the mental and physical health of seniors before and after they acquire English
  • Conduct focus groups with seniors to identify their conclusions as to the links between their health and their English proficiency
slide10

No access to employment? --Provide employment agencies that specialize in placing older workers; Canadians need them too! And, given the ageism in Canadian society, make age one of the “equity categories”, along with the statuses of female, disabled, visible minority, and First Nations people.

Implications for OMHARN research?

  • Identify and evaluate the work of agencies which, if they don’t specialize in serving older workers, at least have an articulated program for serving them as opposed to younger workers
  • Identify what could be replicated more broadly from such programs, and what the consequences are likely to be
  • Conduct economic modeling to determine the impacts of making age a fifth equity category
  • Measure health differences between employed and unemployed immigrant senior cohorts who are matched in other ways
slide11

Insufficient finances? –Do away with artificial barriers: Do away with the two classes of citizenship for seniors, one for senior immigrants from countries with an agreement with Canada so that their citizens receive the OAS immediately, and one for those from other countries, who must wait 10 years for the OAS. If Canada wants to classify sponsored immigrants as “dependents”, then they should stop waving a magic wand on income tax day, which makes these dependents “INDEPENDENTS FOR A DAY” so that the children who sponsored them cannot claim any of their living or medical expenses, etc.

Implications for OMHARN research?

 Conduct comparative health studies of arrival cohorts from countries with and without OAS agreements

 Conduct comparative health studies of arrival cohorts who have and don’t have dependent status

 Conduct FGs with those in independent and multigenerational housing