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DASL 130 – C Programming Course
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  1. DASL 130 – C Programming Course Lecture 4

  2. Pointer Basics • Declare a pointer: type *name; • Note: position of star does not matter so long as it’s between type and name • To point to a normal variable use ‘address of’ operator -- & • int normal = 5; • int * p = &normal;

  3. Pointer Usage • *p references the value at p • p is the address stored in p, aka the address of the variable that p points to • Be careful when using operators on pointers! • *p++ is the value at the next address after p • (*p)++ is the value p points to plus 1

  4. Arrays • Declaring an Array: • type name[size]; //Values for each • type name[] = {element1, element2, etc}; • type name[size] = {size must match #elements};

  5. Array Access • Arrays are zero-indexed – first element has the 0 subscript • a[0] – first element of array ‘a[x]’ • a[4] – last element of a five element array ‘a[5]’ • for the array - int a[5] – the syntax a[6] will access memory out of bounds

  6. Array Pointer Access • int a[5] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4}; • int *p = a (is the same as) int *p = &a[0] • p++ is then &a[1] • In other words, arrays are stored sequentially in memory

  7. Strings • char * a = “A string” • char a[] = “A character array” • char *a = new char a[x] • Strings are fixed once declared, the contents of the string cannot be changed • The pointer can be targeted to another string, however • A char array can be changed