Download
raising standards by setting targets and tracking progress n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Raising Standards by Setting Targets and Tracking Progress PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Raising Standards by Setting Targets and Tracking Progress

Raising Standards by Setting Targets and Tracking Progress

196 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

Raising Standards by Setting Targets and Tracking Progress

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Raising Standards by Setting Targets and Tracking Progress Taking account of average point scores (APS) and the new literacy and numeracy frameworks

  2. Contents • Introduction:How to get the most from the book Page 3 • Section 1a:Tracking Progress in Key Stage 1 Page 6 • Section 1b:Tracking Progress in Key Stage 2 Page 17 • Section 2:Setting Targets in Key Stage 1 Page 27 • Section 3:Setting Targets in Key Stage 2 Page 162

  3. Introduction:How to get the most from the Book

  4. How the Book is set out • The book has been set in three main sections; Section 1: Provides support for Tracking pupils through Key Stages 1 and 2 linking to CVA for Key Stage 2. Making use of this section will help you recognise whether progress is satisfactory or better or whether there is underachievement happening Section 2: Identifies small progressive steps for pupils in Key Stage 1, these are linked to National Curriculum levels (where applicable); average point scores and stages of development identified in the table set out in Page 10; Section 3: Identifies small progressive steps for pupils in Key Stage 2, these are linked to National Curriculum levels; average point scores and stages of development identified in the table set out in Page 20;

  5. How to use the Book There are several ways to make use of this book: • Use the identified small jumps to help individuals to recognise the next step they need to take in order to improve in each subject; (These are identified as Stages; Sub levels of the National Curriculum or by Average Point Scores (APS); • Use the statements to aid report writing; • Focus on the Average Point Scores to help you link the targets with expected progress over a given time; • Use the formulae set out in the next chapter to help you work out expected progress; set challenging targets and (in the case of Key Stage 2) to link to Contextual Value Added (CVA) for each pupil in English, mathematics and science; • For the Foundation Subjects the statements may help with long and medium term planning.

  6. Section 1a:Tracking Progress:in Key Stage 1

  7. Tracking Progress in Key Stage 1 • This Tracking system is built around the principles of looking at the Attainment point on entry into Key Stage 1 and then using a Standard Progress Expectation to work out expected progress. To allow for expected variation in the rate of progress, a Contextual Analysis for each pupil is then applied. • The Standard Progress Expectation is initially built around test results and Teacher Assessments over the previous five years. The Contextual Analysis takes account of what has already been identified by the DfES as part of its CVA, which is used as part of RAISEonline analysis for Key Stage 2. • This system enables schools to work out expected progress for every child in every class in the following areas: Reading, Writing, Mathematics, ICT, Science, Design and Technology, History/Geography, PSHE, Art, Music and Physical Education. • Contextual Analysis takes account of the main things that would vary the rate of progress. These are identified as: Prior Attainment; Socio-Economic Factors; Term of Birth; Ethnicity, particularly English as an Additional Language; Mobility; Gender; Recognition of Children with Learning Difficulty or Disability.

  8. Standard Progress Expectation • This book helps you identify exactly the level of attainment of each child in Years 1 and 2. To do this great care has been taken to take account of the Foundation Stage profile and National Curriculum levels. However, the main progress analysis is done through Average Point Scores (APS), eg, Level 1b being 9 points and Level 2b being 15 points. • The Key Stage 1 section identifies 24 stages in total. They are small, even jumps that take children from the levels identified through average point scores (aps) within the Foundation Stage Profile to the National Curriculum levels. It also identifies the points at which they converge, eg, FSP Point 9 (lower) being a lower National Curriculum Level 1b(lower) which equates to 9 APS. • The Foundation Stage Profile points have been merged with P scales to help provide the Stages 1 to 11. It is appreciated that the FS Profile is not intended to be used as a measure for progress in Key Stage 1 but by using the P scales it is possible to use the framework that has been set out on Page 8. In addition, an appropriate average point score (APS) has been included for the convenience of linking the progress with RAISEonline measures. • A good guide is to accept that Stage 1 can equate to a child who is presently matching the description that is outlined for that area. For example, in writing, a child entering Year 1 at Stage 1 is likely to have been recognised at FS Profile point 1 for CLL at the end of the Reception year. In the same way a child entering Year 1 at Stage 3 in history is likely to have been recognised as being at FS Profile point 3 in KUW at the end of the reception.

  9. Standard Progress Expectation • The Standard Progress Expectation within Key Stage 1 is 10 stages (5 for Year 1 and 5 for Year 2). For example, a Year 1 child identified as having Profile Point 6/7 (upper); that is Stage 7 (APS 5) at the beginning of the year should have reached Level 2b (upper) by the end of Year 2 at Stage 17 (APS 15). A child at the upper end of Profile Point 9/Stage 11 (APS 9) at the beginning of Year 1 should progress to Level 3c (upper)/Stage 21 (APS 19) by the end of Year 2. • This will vary, however, according to the contextual indicators for each child. These include socio-economic circumstances and gender amongst others and will be identified more fully later. • The next page identifies the Stages 1 to 24, outlining the APS, National Level (where appropriate) and FSP (if applicable).

  10. Standard Progress Expectation

  11. Introducing Contextual Value Added and its Potential Impact on Progress • Although previous pages set out the expected rate of progress, this will not be the progress expected for all because factors such as prior attainment and background impact on this. • The following are all of the factors likely to govern rate of progress through Key Stage 1. Each will vary the expected progress in the way described in the following pages: • Prior Attainment • Socio-Economic Factors • Term of Birth • Ethnicity, particularly English as an Additional Language • Mobility • Gender • Recognised with Learning Difficulty or Disability

  12. Contextual Value Added and its Impact on Progress

  13. Contextual Value Added and Its Impact on Progress

  14. Example: Bringing Together Standard Progress Expectation and Contextual Analysis

  15. Example of Cumulative Progress Tracker Sheet

  16. Key Stage 1 Cumulative Progress Tracker Sheet

  17. Section 1b:Tracking Progress:in Key Stage 2

  18. Tracking Progress in Key Stage 2 • The Key Stage 2 Tracking system is built around the principles of using the Attainment point on entry into Year 3 and then adding a Standard Progress Expectation to work out expected progress. To allow for expected variation in the rate of progress, a Contextual Analysis for each pupil is then applied using the principles that underpin CVA from RAISEonline. • The Standard Progress Expectation is initially built around test results and Teacher Assessments at the end of Year 2. The Contextual Analysis takes account of what has already been identified by the DfES as part of its CVA, which is used as part of RAISEonline analysis for Key Stage 2. • This system enables schools to work out expected progress for every child in every class in the following areas: Reading, Writing, Mathematics, ICT, Science, Design and Technology, History, Geography, PSHE, Art, Music and Physical Education. • Contextual Analysis takes account of the main things that would vary the rate of progress. These are identified as: Prior Attainment; Socio-Economic Factors; Term of Birth; Ethnicity, particularly English as an Additional Language; Mobility; Gender; Recognition of Children with Learning Difficulty or Disability.

  19. Key Stage 2 Standard Progress Expectation • At Key Stage 2, 26 to 30 Stages have been identified (depending on the subject). They are small, even jumps that take children up the levels identified within the National Curriculum, Levels 1 to 5 (Level 5a for some and up to the upper end of Level 5c for others). In addition to the levels identified, the table shows the average point score (APS) associated with each sub level. • The Standard progress Expectation is 12 points (APS) in the 4 Key Stage 2 years which equate to 12 Stages on the diagram identified in the following page. This is the starting point before the Contextual Analysis is then taken into account.

  20. Standard Progress Expectation

  21. Contextual Value Added (CVA) and its Potential Impact on Progress • Although the standard expectation is that pupils advance 12 points in Key Stage 2, this will not be the progress expected for all because factors such as prior attainment and background impact on this. • You could use the Ready Reckoner to help you work out the expected progress for each pupil. However, the following is a summary of the factors identified in RAISEonline as likely to influence the rate of progress through Key Stage 2. Each will vary the expected progress in the way described in the following pages: • Prior Attainment • Socio-Economic Factors • Date of Birth • Ethnicity, particularly English as an Additional Language • Mobility • Gender • Recognised with Learning Difficulty or Disability

  22. Contextual Value Added and its Impact on Progress

  23. Contextual Value Added and its Impact on Progress

  24. Example: Bringing Together Standard Progress Expectation and Contextual Analysis

  25. Example of Cumulative Progress Tracker Sheet

  26. Example of Cumulative Progress Tracker Sheet

  27. Section 2:Targets:at Key Stage 1

  28. Targets at Key Stage 1 • The following pages outline targets for different subjects or areas of learning linking each set of targets with average point scores (APS) and National Curriculum sub levels. • It is not intended as an exhaustive list but should help children to focus on their next area of learning. • It is not necessary to present children with each and every target at any given point but the teacher should initially use their discretion as to how best to manage the system for them. • For writing, reading and mathematics it expected that the children’s targets are very visual and may appear at front of books or on cards that they have easy access to. However for all other subjects it may be best to present the targets in the form of objectives at the beginning of a specific theme or project. • The targets for foundation subjects are set out in a skill format and not in a content system. In this way they should be generic across different themes or projects. • The targets for writing include secretarial targets (to with punctuation, spelling and handwriting) as well compositional targets. It is important that a balance be struck across the different types of targets.

  29. Working Towards Targets Key Stage 1 Writing

  30. Targets in Writing

  31. Targets in Writing

  32. Targets in Writing

  33. Targets in Writing

  34. Targets in Writing

  35. Targets in Writing

  36. Targets in Writing

  37. Targets in Writing

  38. Targets in Writing

  39. Targets in Writing

  40. Targets in Writing

  41. Targets in Writing

  42. Targets in Writing

  43. Targets in Writing

  44. Targets in Writing

  45. Targets in Writing

  46. Targets in Writing

  47. Targets in Writing

  48. Targets in Writing

  49. Targets in Writing

  50. Targets in Writing