slide1 l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Richard. Baker@anu.au Deputy Dean College of Science Australian National University PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Richard. Baker@anu.au Deputy Dean College of Science Australian National University

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 42

Richard. Baker@anu.au Deputy Dean College of Science Australian National University - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 264 Views
  • Uploaded on

Linking teaching and research – some ideas from my teaching at the Australian National University “The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be kindled” (Plutarch, c46–127 AD). Richard. Baker@anu.edu.au Deputy Dean College of Science Australian National University.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Richard. Baker@anu.au Deputy Dean College of Science Australian National University' - glenda


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Linking teaching and research – some ideas from my teaching at the Australian National University “The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be kindled” (Plutarch, c46–127 AD)

Richard.Baker@anu.edu.au

Deputy Dean

College of Science

Australian National University

slide2
Note detailed online course resources including full video of all lectures are available for my course at
  • http://fennerschool-people.anu.edu.au/richard_baker/teaching.html
  • Or if you just want the lecture videos go to Apple’s iTunes Store – click iTunesU in top menu bar – search for Australian National University – click on all – and then on ENVS1001 or ENVS3028
introduction
Introduction
  • Will talk today about linking teaching and research to engage students in deep learning with some examples from my teaching but first would like to show briefly talk about the outcomes from a recent workshop that I had the privilege of chairing in the UK.
  • Our workshop examined what we can do to maximize the benefits of linking teaching and research in terms of undergraduate student learning. A key point we kept coming back to was kindling the fire Plutarch speaks of.
  • I would argue that igniting this fire demands that we utlise fire in the belly of every successful researcher about discovery and the in turn conveying this excitement to students.
international alliance of research universities
International Alliance of Research Universities
  • In 2008 Elizabeth Fallaize PVC(E) at Oxford and I drafted a paper for the IARU presidents (see http://www.iaruni.org/ for list of IARU members) on opportunities for our universities to enhance student learning by working on research-teaching links
quote from our paper to the iaru presidents
Quote from our paper to the IARU presidents
  • In the case of the IARU universities, the link between teaching and research forms the very raison d’être of our alliance. The world’s best research intensive universities have something special to offer in terms of the creation and sharing of knowledge. The IARU alliance is uniquely positioned to offer our students a radically enhanced learning experience by clarifying and articulating our approach to the research-teaching nexus and sharing teaching resources on the issue. This paper proposes that IARU partners explore together our concepts of research-based learning and create a IARU-wide community of learning for students and academics, based on our shared ideas.
  • IARU and Research-led teaching and learning Richard Baker, Deputy Dean, College of Science, Australian National University Elizabeth Fallaize, Pro-Vice Chancellor (Education) Oxford. Paper for the meeting of the International Alliance of Research University Presidents 2008 Apr 22-23, 2008, Yale
slide6

Outcome of our paper was a workshop in Cambridge February 2009 that I chaired of heads of Education and Teaching and Learning Support Centres of the IARU partners.

Two key points arising from these discussions that I think are relevant to our discussions today were

  • “the educational benefits for our students in studying in research intense institutions don’t just happen but are something we have to work at. We therefore need to consciously build upon existing effective synergies and actively address institutional barriers working against these potential synergies.
  • a key strategy should be focusing as far as possible in our teaching on “process of mind” instead of a focus on content. For example researchers need to convey to students what it means to think like a biologist/historian etc. In turn such a focus has profound effects on how we teach and how we assess.”
value of research based education
Value of Research-Based Education

“In a ‘knowledge society’ all students - certainly all graduates - have to be researchers. Not only are they engaged in the production of knowledge; they must also be educated to cope with the risks and uncertainties generated by the advance of science. In other words, education and research co-mingle in ways that make their artificial separation destructive of the highest standards in both.” Scott, P. 2002

lets focus on student learning outcomes rather than academic tendency to fuss over terminology
Lets focus on student learning outcomes rather than academic tendency to fuss over terminology!
  • In terms of linking teaching and research a lot of time can be (and often is) wasted debating about what terms we should be using and what they mean.
  • I am not fussed about what terms people adopt but I do know that something very powerful happens when we link the following effectively in a virtuous cycle of course enhancement
    • Teaching informed by the research we do
    • Developing the research skills of our students to assist them to be more effective in class and life long learners
    • Researching the effectiveness of our teaching / learning outcomes of our students
personal reflections on my education
Personal reflections on my education
  • 1st year ANU student – Mulvaney’s suitcase
  • Geography research project
professor john mulvaney
Professor John Mulvaney
  • Pioneer of Australian archaeology taught me first year archaeology at ANU at the time he was involved in the discipline defining Lake Mungo discoveries that redefined our knowledge of prehistoric Australia
  • would literally come into lectures with a suitcase with artifacts he had excavated the previous weekend
first year geography project
First year Geography project
  • Major assessment item was working one to one with a leading Australian geomorphologist assisting him with a real self contained research problem that involved working with sediment samples he wanted analysed
  • Spent about 30 hours over the year long course in his lab
slide12
These Research-led Education opportunities for me as a first year provided me with a profound induction into becoming an academic
  • Saw that knowledge is constructed
  • element of an old fashion apprenticeship in the geography one
  • what we were learning in class was unfolding literally before our eyes
  • Gained skills and confidence to be a research and a teacher by being mentored
  • Being allowed to make mistakes and learn from them a key part of inducting students into thinking like researchers
slide13
Personal reflections on teaching-research nexus from my teaching – more details of each at the open access websites for each
  • 1st year “Resources, Environment and Society: the Geography of Sustainability” http://fennerschool-lectures.anu.edu.au/lectures/2009/ENVS1001/
  • 3rd year “Environmental Policy and Planning” http://fennerschool-lectures.anu.edu.au/lectures/2009/ENVS3028/
  • “Viet Nam field school” open to students from every faculty in every year of study http://fennerschool-people.anu.edu.au/richard_baker/ENVS2017/index.htm
  • “Unravelling Complexity” – by invitation course – top 10 final year students from each ANU College http://studyat.anu.edu.au/courses/UGRD3001;details.html
  • 3rd year Murray-Darling Basin Field course http://fennerschool-people.anu.edu.au/richard_baker/teaching/epp/index.html
  • 3 Masters coursework options based around extensions to first 3 listed courses
  • Honours, Masters and PhD supervision – detail of all my graduate students are at http://fennerschool-people.anu.edu.au/richard_baker/mygrad.html
research led nature of envs1001 resources environment and society the geography of sustainability
Research-led nature of ENVS1001 “Resources, Environment and Society: the geography of sustainability”
  • Course established in response to my reading of the literature on the first year experience at Australian universities
  • Focus my teaching around my research with Indigenous people on resource management and Indigenous knowledge systems
  • First lecture for example asks them to consider Yolgnu metaphors of learning and how they might apply to their university careers
  • Focus on building up student research skills
  • Weekly two hour panel where researchers and policy makers engage in debates
  • Final assessment student presentations on what they

have learnt about research

some of the research evidence
Some of the research evidence
  • The Commencing Study at the ANU - The Experience of the 1999 Undergraduate Cohort found that 47% of first year students were unprepared for classes. Of these 18% of students reported never reading suggested materials with a further 29% only sometimes preparing for class.
  • Also of significance was the finding that 45% of first year students were not comfortable participating in group discussions.
  • The course aims and objectives have been developed to systematically address the findings ofFirst Year on Campus: Diversity in the Initial Experiences of Australian Undergraduates (McInnis et al 1995). the importance of the social context in enhancing first year student learning;
  • the need to present intellectually challenging courses that encourage independent learning; and
  • the need to provide a supportive framework to address the difficulties many students have making the transition to the more independent learning style that is required at university.
opening minds
“Opening minds”

“they really kind of pushed you into having this open mind. And the whole theory that several truths can coexist. Which makes it a lot easier in your other subjects when they say something that you don’t completely agree with. You don’t turn off any more, you start to think about things more and that’s something this course encouraged.” (Focus group, 2003)

environmental policy and planning epp
“Environmental Policy and Planning” (EPP)
  • 3rd (final year) undergraduate course.
  • “Research” in the policy area about writing effective policy and giving succinct briefs to ministers so course focuses on this – egs on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/user/ANUSustainability?gl=GB&hl=en-GB#p/a/CB752FA7D5711285/0/Jjr6PIgyt8s and on the course site at http://fennerschool-lectures.anu.edu.au/lectures/2009/ENVS3028/support_material/briefing.html
  • Like many other courses at ANU has wide range of students from different academic and cultural backgrounds
  • Utilise this see examples of student presentations on policy that works in over 20 different countries at http://fennerschool-lectures.anu.edu.au/lectures/2009/ENVS3028/6528/index.html
vietnamese student s learning portfolio s reflection on the first tutorial
Vietnamese student’s Learning Portfolio’s reflection on the first tutorial
  • “My tutorial group consists of people from different countries: Australia, Fiji, Vietnam, China, Cambodia, Japan, and India. This is very helpful for us to learn each other about EPP experience from different countries”.
international students
International students
  • Make up 10-20% of class each year
  • In 2005 had student run tutorial on public participation in environmental planning run by East Timoresese student involved in post Indonesian reconstruction, a Bhutanese community forester and a Japanese environmentalist.
  • 2007 a Filipino graduate of the class on a return visit to Canberra gave a class on her work taking the Australian landcare model back to her country
teaching beyond the classroom
Teaching beyond the classroom
  • Encouraging subsequent internships - eg Australian National Internship Program with politicians, policy makers at Bureau of Rural Sciences or scientists at our national science organisation
  • Involving former students in person (in panel discussions) and via email (ie regularly updated webpage on how to get a job in the Environmental Policy area)
  • Web listing of former students to assist them networking and to allow current students to find mentors
slide21
I use an electronic network of former students to keep students in touch with the real world of policy
  • have used email to keep in touch with about 600 of the graduates
  • 180 of them working in Environment Planning and Policy areas and details of their current positions – see http://fennerschool-people.anu.edu.au/richard_baker/resources/formernow.html
  • Engage them in my teaching electronically and also class based for those still in (or visiting) Canberra
recent panelists
Recent Panelists
  • Annie Sanderson 2003 SKM consultancy
  • Karen Lummis, Dep Env 1998 Karen Lummis Environmental Stewardship Program Caring for our Country Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts and Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry
  • Libby Pittard 2005 Graduate, Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.
  • Anneke Staring 2005 National Site EMS Coordinator for Dept of Defense
  • Jason Forest EPP 1997 Planning Project Manager, ACT Planning and Land Authority
  • Joanne Mitchell EPP 1997 Project Manager Regional Coordination Program- South East Office NSW Department of Premier & Cabinet
  • Deb Cleland 2005 DEWHA in Environmental Approvals in the biodiversity offsets team of the EIA Policy SectionThematic Coordinator National Land & Water Resources Audit
  • Peter Wilson 2002 Operational Support Unit, Australian Partners Branch, AusAID
  • Colin Wiltshire 2002 Asia Pacific Section, International Strategies Branch, Portfolio Strategies Division Department of Health and Ageing
  • Laura Holbeck 2002 - Policy Officer International Section Department of the Environment and Heritage
  • David Kilham 1998 - Senior Policy Officer, Legislation Policy Section, Approvals and Wildlife Division, Dept of the Environment and Heritage Thematic Coordinator National Land & Water Resources Audit
  • Anne Leo 1998 - Executive Officer Office of the Secretary - Australian Government Department of the Environment and Heritage
  • Lisa Blanch 2000 - Project Officer Greenhouse Gas Abatement Program Industry and Markets BranchAustralian Greenhouse Office
  • Ruth Doran 2001 - Scientist Bureau of Rural Sciences, AFFA
  • Nathan Wales 1995 - GIS project officer Department of the Environment and Heritage.
  • Rebekah Hamed, 1998 Strategic Policy and Projects, Dept of Sustainability and Environment, Victoria
  • Catherine Mobbs – 1994 Research Coordinator Land and Water Australia
recent panelists23
Recent Panelists
  • Annie Sanderson 2003 SKM consultancy
  • Karen Lummis, Dep Env 1998 Karen Lummis Environmental Stewardship Program Caring for our Country Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts and Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry
  • Libby Pittard 2005 Graduate, Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.
  • Anneke Staring 2005 National Site EMS Coordinator for Dept of Defense
  • Jason Forest EPP 1997 Planning Project Manager, ACT Planning and Land Authority
  • Joanne Mitchell EPP 1997 Project Manager Regional Coordination Program- South East Office NSW Department of Premier & Cabinet
  • Deb Cleland 2005 DEWHA in Environmental Approvals in the biodiversity offsets team of the EIA Policy SectionThematic Coordinator National Land & Water Resources Audit
  • Peter Wilson 2002 Operational Support Unit, Australian Partners Branch, AusAID
  • Colin Wiltshire 2002 Asia Pacific Section, International Strategies Branch, Portfolio Strategies Division Department of Health and Ageing
  • Laura Holbeck 2002 - Policy Officer International Section Department of the Environment and Heritage
  • David Kilham 1998 - Senior Policy Officer, Legislation Policy Section, Approvals and Wildlife Division, Dept of the Environment and Heritage Thematic Coordinator National Land & Water Resources Audit
  • Anne Leo 1998 - Executive Officer Office of the Secretary - Australian Government Department of the Environment and Heritage
briefing paper exercise learning portfolio
Briefing paper exercise - Learning Portfolio
  • “What a great assignment! I think it was a very appropriate way to end the course, allowing us to put everything we have learnt into practice and learn a practical tool that we are likely to use in the future. I think essays are important in developing writing and grammatical skills, however, rarely are they used in the real world … The skills and knowledge that I gained from EPP are already proving to be useful I the real world”
  • Egs on YouTube – Search for “ANUSustainability” or go straight tohttp://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=CB752FA7D5711285
  • Or via my webpage – google “Richard Baker ANU”
unravelling complexity
Unravelling Complexity
  • Taught this semester for the first time
  • 10 outstanding final year students from each of ANU’s 7 colleges
  • Each separate ANU college ran a different panel session exploring how that area deals with complex issues
  • Next year plan to have 30 from each
  • Using similar ‘briefing” exercise for ministers
  • Involving former students who are ministerial advisors now
  • Briefing sessions this year in Parliament House with the PM’s senior advisors
  • Focus on interdisciplinary team based assignments
envs2017 viet nam field trip
ENVS2017 Viet Nam Field Trip
  • Taught in Viet Nam for 16 days
  • Open to students from all disciplines and all years of their degree
  • Prior to going I organise a weekend of workshops at the ANU
  • Intensive language component first week
  • Two home stays - one in Da Nang other in small village
  • Stay for 4 days in world heritage - Hoi An
assessment
Assessment
  • 5%: Learning goal statement
  • 10-20%: Vietnamese language improvement
  • 30-60%: Learning portfolio
  • 25-40% Group research project

For full details on assessment go to

  • http://fennerschool-people.anu.edu.au/richard_baker/teaching/SRES2017/assessment.htm
an interdisciplinary course
An interdisciplinary course

Taught by a a Vietnamese tutor (who is an ANU graduate), a geography, an anthropologist and Vietnamese language teacher

Students from every faculty and every year of their degrees do the course

making interdisciplinary research work
Making interdisciplinary research work
  • Key task for us teaching it is to get students from different disciplines working effectively together in small research teams and a key starting point for us is to model effective interdisciplinarity in how we teach the course
  • Heart of the interdisciplinarity of the course is a research focus for the students - they pick issues they are interested in exploring as group research projects and it comes abundantly clear to them as they explore these problems that they need to bring together a a variety of disciplines to explore these issues
standing on the shoulders of giants
“Standing on the shoulders of giants”
  • Using student learning portfolios to enhance a field course each time it is taught through reflection on student reflection
  • Key part of each year’s preparation reading previous portfolios
confronting research and personal issues jolting students into a new mind space
Confronting research and personal issues - jolting students into a new mind space
  • Research - “what is development”, made real by seeing people without safe drinking water or with seasonal food shortages
  • Personally - demanding home stays in Da Nang and in a remote village. Learning survival Vietnamese
  • Key is to extend students outside their comfort zone but to have a safety net when they need it
aha moments for me and my students
Aha moments for me and my students

Feeding your family when crops fail

  • Reading final learning portfolios

“I will never read a journal article with the same naivety I once had, learning first hand and having the opportunity to conduct such raw primary research will be a valued experience in my future academic career.”

Law Student

keys to creating circumstances for undergraduate research
Keys to creating circumstances for undergraduate research
  • Created a peer based learning environment - shared learning goals, wikis to collaboratively develop research project
  • Small diverse class - every faculty and year of study
  • Reading about research and small group work including “pearls of wisdom” from past and present class on making group work work
  • Modelling team work by team teaching course
researching teaching research
Researching teaching research
  • 2008 class feedback on what was the best aspect of the course
  • 2009 class asked to outline what research is will present findings of this in a minute
  • Focus the preparatory workshop next month around this issue again to provide an explicit induction into doing research
  • Will as in previous years ask them in their final talks and Learning Portfolio to reflect on what they have learnt about doing research (as well as about themselves and about VN)
  • Will use this material to hopefully further improve the subsequent course
student responses on notable strengths
Student responses on “notable strengths”
  • 8 mention the word “research”
  • 7 mention “field work”, “being in the dirt”, “talking to locals”
  • 6 others mention “independent learning”, “in-depth analysis” or “challenging learning environment”

Of 26 students without any prompting:

2009 students definitions of research
2009 students definitions of research
  • Research is a suprising (sic) undertaking where you will discover questions...and then maybe some answers.
  • Research has the objective of gaining deeper insight into a given topic through the individiual (sic) and/or collective process of enquiry
  • Research (sic) is a process through which an individual or group carries out to gain a better understanding of a subject/area
  • Reserach (sic) is a process through which an individual or group carries out to gain a better understanding of a subject/area; it may be qualitative or quantitative.
  • I believe research to be the thorough and methodical exploration or inquiry into a subject in order to learn or revise facts or theories.
other learning portfolio extracts
Other Learning Portfolio extracts
  • The most interesting thing for me was learning that the majority of stuff you learn at university goes unused, but it’s the actual procedures and mindset that helps you in the field - Batchelor of Resource Management Student
  • Vietnam was much more than just six credit points. It was a life changing experience. Through exploring the themes as mentioned above we were able to learn about ourselves, group work, Vietnam and first hand experience the highs and lows of cross cultural research - Batchelor of Interdisciplinary Studies (Sustainability)
slide40
Key to engaging research only staff in teaching: clear recognition and explanation of different forms of contribution to teaching is needed
  • occasional guest lectures, limited to content delivery
  • blocks of lectures
  • traditional teaching (whole courses, including administrative and assessment aspects)
  • ‘niche’ third year, research-based courses - Honours Pathway Courses
  • Running tutorials
  • theory or method workshops
  • field-based practical sessions
  • honours or research project supervision;
  • one-to-one mentoring (eg the PhB program);
references
References
  • Le Heron, R., Baker, R. and McEwen. L. Co-learning: Re-linking Research and Teaching in Geography, Journal of Geography in Higher Education. Oxford: March Vol.30, Iss. 1: 77-88
  • Pearson, M. et al 1999 Commencing Study at the ANU - The Experience of the 1999 Undergraduate Cohort, Report by the Centre for Educational Development and Academic Methods, Australian National University.
  • McInnis, C., James, R and McNaught, C. 1995 First Year on Campus: Diversity in the Initial Experiences of Australian Undergraduates, Centre for the Study of Higher Education University of Melbourne, produced by the Australian Government Publishing Service
  • Alan Jenkins and Mick Healey 2005 Institutional Strategies to link teaching and research - The Higher Educational Academy www.heacademy.ac.uk/assets/York/documents/ourwork/research/Institutional_strategies.pdf
  • Alan Jenkins, Mick Healey and Roger Zetter 2007 Linking teaching and research in disciplines and departments, The Higher Educational Academy http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/ourwork/research/teaching
  • Alan Jenkins et al 2003 Reshaping Teaching in Higher Education: Linking Teaching and Research, Kogan Page
  • Scott,P. (2002) A lot to learn: we are all researchers now, Education Guardian, January 8th, p13. Available at education.guardian.co.uk/egweekly/story/0,,628918,00.html
thank you for your attention
Thank you for your attention
  • Any feedback most gratefully received

Richard.Baker@anu.edu.au

  • If anyone is in central Vietnam in January-February 2010 (or hopefully Januarys for many years to come) contact me and you can can join ANU and Da Nang studetns for a Karaoke night 