student success advisor training foundation program n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Student Success Advisor Training Foundation Program PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Student Success Advisor Training Foundation Program

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 68
glen

Student Success Advisor Training Foundation Program - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

113 Views
Download Presentation
Student Success Advisor Training Foundation Program
An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author. While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Student Success Advisor Training Foundation Program Conceptualising the role of the Student Success Advisor and Practice Frameworks for Student Success and Retention

  2. Acknowledgment to Country In the Spirit of Reconciliation Following on from Sorry Day I would like to acknowledge and honour the Traditional Custodians of this land that we are meeting on today, the Yugambeh People, and pay respect to their Elders past and present

  3. Our Goal Working together to make sense of and build ownership and commitment to the Student Success Advisor (SSA) role.

  4. What is the SSA role?

  5. What is the SSA role?

  6. How shall we start to work together to ‘make sense’ of our SSA role?

  7. Student Success Advisor:What is our core purpose?

  8. Student Success Advisor: Core Purpose Proactive intervention for enhancing student engagement, success and retention. Focused on being a ‘game changer’ in students lives.

  9. Student Success Advisor

  10. Why are coherent practice frameworks important?‘The Six Rs’........... • Rationale for what I plan to do • Reflect and re-orient as I am working • Review what I have done or the effect I have had • Replicate what has worked • Re-design what hasn’t worked • Report to others what I have learnt

  11. Why are coherent practice frameworks important?‘The Six Rs’...........

  12. We are not ‘lone wolves’......as a network of SSAs we need a shared language!

  13. What are the general practice frameworks that we will use? Our Shared Language Student Transition Student lifecycle Levels of systems intervention Facets of academic culture

  14. 1. Transition Model for student success: The Five Senses of Success

  15. The Five Senses of Student Success (Lizzio, 2006) Sense of Capability Sense of Connectedness Sense of Student Identity Sense of Purpose Sense of Resourcefulness

  16. How might we as SSAs facilitate student’s successful transition?

  17. How might we as SSAs facilitate our student’s successful transition? Sense of Identity: Help me understand, validate and appreciate myself as a university student. Sense of Connection: Help me to belong and feel connected. Sense of Resourcefulness: Help me to navigate this system and my competing priorities. Sense of Capability: Help me to feel confident and capable as a student. Sense of Purpose: Help me to develop a sense of direction and commitment.

  18. 2. The Student Lifecycle

  19. The Student Lifecycle Students’ needs, identities and developmental priorities vary over their degree.... Therefore We need to understand and respond with developmentally appropriate services and interventions at key points of the lifecycle.

  20. Understanding the Student Lifecycle Process (Higher Education Academy, 2001) Early Contact Pre-Semester (Admission, Enrolment & Orientation) All of Semester 1, especially the first 7 Weeks End of semester 1 First 7 Weeks of Semester 2 End of Year One transition into Year 2 Years 2 & 3 Alumni and Postgraduate

  21. How might we as SSAs facilitate our student’s success across the lifecycle? Pre-Semester Engaging students from point of offer Orientation and Induction Assisting planning, enrolment & orientation of students Early Semester Running foundational academic skills development & assessment workshops Working with students at early risk of disengagement & departure Through Semester Consulting with students to assist academic success or academic recovery Post Semester Facilitating recovery or problem-solving with failing & failed students

  22. Levels of Systems InterventionHow do we identify our priorities for strategic action?

  23. How do we identify our priorities for strategic action?Levels of Intervention Framework

  24. How do we identify our priorities for strategic action?Levels of Intervention Framework

  25. How might we as SSAs facilitate strategies focused on general primary prevention? What will we do for all students? Collaboratively Contribute to a Student-Centred Success Culture Membership of the Student Success & Retention Team Establish Universal Procedures and Mechanisms Facilitate early student planning through Mail-outs, Enrolment Day Provide Universal Opportunities for Development Implement academic skills development workshops & assessment workshops Communicate with the Whole Cohort Facilitate peer mentoring systems, use email and social media to assist planning & engagement

  26. Priorities for Strategic Action to Improve Retention - Levels of Intervention framework

  27. How might we as SSAs facilitate strategies focused on targeted primary prevention? What will we do for specific groups of students? Pre-semester Front-loaded Outreach Interventions Initiate from point of offer negotiated engagement consultations with “late engagers” (students identified at risk of early discontinuation based on distal indicators (viz., low OP x low preference x LOTE x low SES) Mid-Semester Front-loaded Outreach Interventions Working with other staff to retain students who may ‘migrate’ or ‘transfer’ to other universities (e..g, high OP low preference) Active Ongoing Profiling and Monitoring of Students Building and maintaining a CRM ‘practice database’ on the engagement and performance of identified sub-groups of students (e.g., international)

  28. Griffith students at risk of early discontinuation 1/2012 on Distal risk markers(Low OPs (11+) x Low degree preference (3rd+) x LOTE x Low SES)

  29. Does early intervention work?We have achieved good success rates with “High Risk” Students in targeted Schools/Programs 1/2012 Late Engagers = (low OP x low preference x ESL x LSES) B. Business – 68 ‘late engagers’ in Sem. 1 (12% of the FY intake) • 82% passed at least 1 course • 6 3 % passed all 4 core courses • Only 7% failed all 4 core courses • Those who passed all 4 courses evidenced high levels of attendance at PASS, SASA academic skills workshops & SASA consults

  30. Priorities for Strategic Action to Improve Retention Levels of Intervention framework

  31. How might we as SSAs facilitate strategies focused on secondary prevention? What will we do for students identified as ‘at-risk’ of discontinuation? During semester Working with academic staff to implement the 6 Risk Markers in a key or threshold course and following-up students who are failing early assessment tasks

  32. Secondary Prevention:Proximal Success or Risk Markers across first semester

  33. Operation Student Success Trial: Markers 1-3: Patterns for 1/2012

  34. How might we as SSAs facilitate strategies focused on secondary prevention? What will we do for students identified as ‘at-risk’? Mid semester • Contact students from the Starting@Griffith survey who self-identify an early intention to leave Griffith

  35. Priorities for Strategic Action to Improve Retention - Levels of Intervention framework

  36. How might we as SSAs facilitate strategies focused on tertiary prevention? What will we do for failing students? Post semester • Facilitating the academic recovery of students who have failed 2 or more courses in any semester through advising, support and/or referral

  37. 4. Facets of Academic Culture

  38. What’s culture?The governing values, beliefs and ideas of an organisation The way we do things around here!

  39. Why is culture important? ‘Culture’ beats ‘strategy’ hands down every time!

  40. Engaging our commencing students: What culture does our mindset create? Social Darwinist Culture High Challenge Low Support

  41. Engaging our commencing students: What culture does our mindset create? Social Darwinist Culture High Challenge Low Support Academic Welfare Culture Low Challenge High Support

  42. Engaging our commencing students: What culture does our mindset create? Aspirational Culture High Challenge High Support Social Darwinist Culture High Challenge Low Support Academic Welfare Culture Low Challenge High Support

  43. Engaging our commencing students: What culture does our mindset create? Aspirational Culture High Challenge High Support Social Darwinist Culture High Challenge Low Support Disengaged Culture Low Challenge Low support Academic Welfare Culture Low Challenge High Support

  44. Engaging our commencing students: What culture does our mindset create? Aspirational Culture High Challenge High Support Social Darwinist Culture High Challenge Low Support Supported Independence Culture Scaffolding, Dialogue and Data-driven Engagement Disengaged Culture Low Challenge Low support Academic Welfare Culture Low Challenge High Support

  45. Cultural transformationSupported Independence Valued Longer-Term Outcome Necessary Scaffolding Process

  46. What is the SSA role? Activating sustainable student energy!

  47. How do we work to optimise these outcomes?

  48. If we are to be ‘game changers’ and ‘transformers’ for our students then we need to consciously examine our notions of ‘student support’...

  49. Student Support in Higher Education:Traditional Conception: The language of ‘deficits’ What do you associate with the term ‘student support’? • ‘Barriers to success’ are conceptualised as being located within individual students. • Positions the student as ‘having a problem’ with which they ‘need help’. • Systems basic-assumptions (e.g., starting academic capital) are generally unquestioned in the face of diversity • Diversity is confounded with deficit with the consequence that non-traditional students are more likely to feel marginalised

  50. Student Support in Higher Education:Transformational Conception: The language of ‘strengths’ What do you associate with the term ‘facilitating student success’? • ‘Barriers to success’ are conceptualised as being located in student, society and university. • Systems basic-assumptions (e.g., culture) are open to questioning and re-design in the face of diversity • Diversity is conceptualised as inclusive of a range of strengths and identities with the consequence that non-traditional students are more likely to feel respected and valued.