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Epidemic Curves Sensitivity/Specificity. Epidemic Curve. Number of New Cases. Time (since exposure). Notes on Epidemic Curves. Sort by time to illness Think critically about the data (possible problems) Ask questions (or make assumptions) Similar to Survival Curve (see text, p492).

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Epidemic curves sensitivity specificity

Epidemic CurvesSensitivity/Specificity


Epidemic curve
Epidemic Curve

Number of New Cases

Time (since exposure)


Notes on epidemic curves
Notes on Epidemic Curves

  • Sort by time to illness

  • Think critically about the data (possible problems)

  • Ask questions (or make assumptions)

  • Similar to Survival Curve (see text, p492)


Survival from aids in mths p492 in text
Survival from AIDS in Mths (p492 in text)

Hazard

Survival Rate

See Table 21.3 in Text (page 493)


Sensitivity specificity p136 in text
Sensitivity/Specificity (p136 in text)

  • Used in Screening or diagnostic Tests when there is a ‘gold standard’

  • Sensitivity: pr(+| ill)

  • Specificity: pr(-| not ill)

  • Suppose eating a food item is a ‘test’. If yes, the person should be ill. If no, not ill.

  • Use ‘symptoms’ as the ‘gold standard’