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Twelve Angry Men (Part Two). By Reginald Rose. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part two). Part One. Background Information. Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part two). Judges . A judge or justice is an appointed or elected official who presides over a court . The powers,

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slide2

Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part two)

Part One

Background Information

slide3

Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part two)

  • Judges

A judge or justice is an appointed or elected

official who presides over a court. The powers,

functions, and training of judges varies widely

from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.

In USA, judges are not trained separately from

lawyers and are generally appointed or elected

from among practicing attorneys.

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Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part two)

Being a judge is usually a prestigious position in society, and as a result a variety of solemn traditions have become associated with the occupation. In most nations of the world judges wear long robes, usually black or red, and sit on an elevated platform during trials. The standard judges uniform originated with the Roman toga.In some countries, notably Britain, judges also wear long wigs and use special gavels to instill order in the courtroom.In the People’s Republic of China, judges wore regular street clothes until 1984, when they began to wear military style uniforms, which were intended to demonstrate authority. These uniforms were replaced in 2000 by black robes similar to those in the rest of the world.

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Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part two)

In most English speaking countries (particularly the USA) a judge is addressed as "Your Honor" when presiding over the judge's court, as a sign of respect for the office.

The judges of the Supreme Court of the United States, and the judges of the supreme courts of several U. S. states and other countries are called “justices”. In the United Kingdom, a comparable rank is held by the House of Lords; its judges are not called judges, but Law Lords, and sit in the House of Lords as peers.

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Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

Word Study

1. acquittal

n. an official statement in a court of law

that someone is not guilty

Example:

Of 52 prosecutions for police brutality, 46

ended in acquittals.

v. acquit somebody of something

The judge directed the jury to acquit Phillips

of the murder.

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Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

2. avenge

v. to do something to hurt or punish

someone because they have harmed or

offended you

Examples:

The Trojans wish to avenge the death of Hector; their misplaced values mean that patience in adversity is impossible.

Half a century later he has finally avenged that defeat.

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Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

3. bear

v. a.to bravely accept or deal with a

painful, difficult, or upsetting situation

b.to dislike something or someone

very much, often so that they make you feel annoyed or impatient

bear sb. grudge

bear sth. in mind

bear a resemblance/relation to

bear arms

bear fruit

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Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

  • Examples:
  • She was afraid she wouldn't be able to bear
  • the pain.
  • Overcrowding makes prison life even harder
  • to bear.
  • Oh, I really can't bear him.
  • He can't bear spinach.
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Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

4. blunder

n. a careless or stupid mistake

commit a blunder, make a blunder

  • Examples:
  • Major management blunders have led the company into bankruptcy.
  • The parents face a nightmare week-long wait before blood tests show if there has been a hospital blunder.
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Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

5. commonplace

a. happening or existing in many places, and therefore not special or unusual

Examples:

Car thefts are commonplace in this part of

town.

Expensive foreign cars are commonplace in

this Chicago suburb.

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Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

6. injustice

n. a situation in which people are treated

very unfairly and not given their rights

Examples:

The group, called the Wilmington 10, were active in protests against racial injustices in the schools in the early 1970s.

These injustices are intolerable, especially when the victims are children.

a. unjust

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Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

7. intimidate

v. to frighten or threaten someone into making them do what you want

Examples:

They tried to intimidate the young people

into voting for them.

Attempts to intimidate her failed.

Synonyms

threat

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Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

8. lunge

v. to make a sudden strong movement

towards someone or something,

especially to attack them

  • Examples:
  • The goats lunged at each other with their horns.
  • John lunged forward and grabbed him by the throat.
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Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

9. object

v. to feel or say that you oppose or

disapprove of something

  • Examples:
  • Robson strongly objected to the terms of the
  • contract.
  • I objected to having to rewrite the article.

Cf.:

n. object

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Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

10. obscure

v.a. to make something difficult to know or

understand

b. to prevent something from being seen

or heard clearly

  • Examples:
  • Recent successes have obscured the fact that the company is still in trouble.
  • The view was obscured by mist.
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Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

a. a.not well known and usually not very

important

b.difficult to understand

n. obscurity

  • Examples:
  • an obscure poet 无名的,不知名的
  • The details of his life remain obscure.含糊的,
  • 不清楚的
  • He’s using an obscure old law to try to stop
  • the new road being built. 晦涩难懂的
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Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

11. recreate

v. to make something from the past exist

again in a new form or be experienced

again

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Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

  • Examples:
  • Evan often chimes in, so we work together to
  • recreate the story.
  • And we can share best practices so that every
  • educator and employer does not have to
  • recreate effective strategies from scratch.
  • Arjelo's novel vividly recreates 15th-century
  • Spain.
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Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

12. stamp

  • v. a. to put your foot down onto the ground
  • loudly and with a lot of force
  • b. to put a pattern, sign, or letters on
  • something using a special tool
  • c. to have an important or permanent
  • effect on someone or something
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Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

  • Examples:
  • “I will not!” Bert yelled and stamped his
  • foot.
  • The woman at the desk stamped my
  • passport.
  • The experience remained stamped on her
  • memory for many years.
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Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

14. testify

v. a. to make a formal statement of what is

true, especially in a court of law

b.to show clearly that something is the

case

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Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

Examples:

Mr.Molto has agreed to testify at the trial.

Later, the witness who had testified against Muawad withdrew his allegation.

The empty shops in the high street testify to the depth of the recession.

The company's experience testifies to the difficulties of opening a business in a foreign country.

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Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

  • testify at the court
  • testify against sb.
  • testify to sth.
  • testify that…

在法庭作证

作出不利于…的证明

证实

证实, 证明

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Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

  • General Introduction

Plot: A young delinquent awaits sentencing for the manslaughter of his aggressive father. One juror feels there is a reasonable doubt—to the frustration of his eleven colleagues—thus preventing a quick verdict. During the heated deliberations, the hidden preconceptions and prejudices of the jurors are revealed.

Plot elements: conflict, crisis/turning moment, climax, etc.

Setting:jury room

Protagonists : 12 jurors

Theme of the story: "Twelve Angry Men" is about one individual's ability to stand up for what he believes, even when others ridicule him. It is also a powerful study not just of the criminal justice system, but also of the diversity of human experience, the nature of peer pressure, and the difficulty of ever fully knowing the truth.

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No. 7: Bright! He’s a common ignorant slob. He don’t even speak good English.

Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

II. Text Analysis

In Para. 5

Question: What tone was No. 10 using when he attacked the accused? What can we know about No. 10?

He was sneering at the accused in an ironic tone, however he himself made a grammar mistake, thus revealing himself an incompetent language speaker.

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No. 12: … It wasn’t very nice to have it sticking out of some people’s chests.

No. 7: Especially relatives’.

Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

II. Text Analysis

Attention to the wording.

  • Question:Do you think No. 7 was a humorous person? How do you like his joke here?

NO. 12 and No. 7 are joking about this murder. But in fact this is disgusting and distasteful to joke about a murder.

slide31

No. 11: Ah, this then would depend on your definition of panic. He would have to be calm enough to see to it that there were no fingerprints left on the knife. Now, where did the panic start and where did it end?

Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

II. Text Analysis

In Para. 15

Question: Figure out No. 11’s logic of reasoning.

No. 4 thought that the boy could run out in a panic after having killed his father, after he calmed down, he realized that he left his knife at the scene. But No. 11 didn’t think it held water because if the boy had run out in a panic, he couldn’t be so calm to be sure that there were no fingerprints left on the knife. So No. 11 asked where the panic started and where it ended.

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No. 8: Maybe the boy did kill his father, did run out in a panic, …. Maybe all those things happened. But maybe they didn’t. I think there’s enough doubt that we can wonder if he was there at all during the time the killing took place.

Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

II. Text Analysis

In Para. 17

Question: What is the reasonable doubt here?

It is possible that the boy was not at the scene when the killing took place. (or: It is possible that he didn’t come back home only to get his knife, risking being caught.)

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No. 7: (To No. 8) Ran, walked. What’s the difference? Anyway he got there!

Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

II. Text Analysis

In Para. 23

Question: What character did No. 7 reveal here, in your opinion?

He didn’t care much about the details, but in most cases, details can tell the detectives a lot about what could have happened. In fact, No. 7 had got a theatre ticket burning in his pocket, he was in a hurry to get out of here, therefore he just wanted to rush up thus tended to leave out many important things. That just shows us how little he took another person’s life.

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No. 3: He was an old man. Half the time, he was confused. How could he be positive about anything? (He tries to cover his blunder. …)

Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

II. Text Analysis

In Para. 31

Question:What blunder did No. 3 make?

No. 3 said that half the time, the old man was confused and couldn’t be sure about anything, so how could he be so sure that it was 20 seconds?

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No. 3: He was an old man. Half the time, he was confused. How could he be positive about anything? (He tries to cover his blunder. …)

Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

II. Text Analysis

In Para. 31

Question:What blunder did No. 3 make?

No. 3 said that half the time, the old man was confused and couldn’t be sure about anything, so how could he be so sure that it was 20 seconds?

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No. 3: Assumed! Brother, I’ve seen all kinds of dishonesty in my day, but this little display takes the cake. What’s the matter with you guys? You all know he’s guilty. He’s got to burn and you let him slip through our fingers!

Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

II. Text Analysis

In Para. 43

(Also refer to Para. 47)

Question: What did No. 3 assume himself to be? Do you think a conscientious juror should talk like that?

No. 3 was not the executioner, but he talked as if so. He was not supposed to base his judgment simply on what he thought to be. Facts and reason matter most. A conscientious juror should try to be impartial rather than biased.

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No. 3: Phew, I’ll kill him! I’ll kill him!

No. 8: You don’t really mean you’d kill me, do you?

Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

II. Text Analysis

In Para. 49, 50

Question: Why did No. 8 deliberately make No. 3 mad? How do you feel about the language power?

No. 3 couldn’t mean it when he said that “I’ll kill you!”, likewise, it is possible that the accused boy also didn’t mean it when he said the same thing.

It is a clever way to retort. No. 8 just used the same logic of reasoning to fight against No. 3’s logic –if the boy said it, he meant it.

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No. 10: Don’t give me that! I’m sick and tired of facts. You can think any way you like.

Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

II. Text Analysis

In Para. 55

Question: In what way was No. 10’s view of facts different from that of No. 9? Compare and contrast these two jurors.

No. 9: a gentle old man, took his duty as a juror seriously. Decent , upright. “The facts of the case are supposed to determine the case.”

No. 10: prejudiced against poor people and people with little schooling. “I’m sick and tired of facts.”

slide39

No. 7: … How do you like this guy? He comes here running for his life. And now, before he can take a deep breath, he’s telling us how to run the show. The arrogance of this guy.

Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

II. Text Analysis

In Para. 62

Question: How do you think of No.7?

No. 7 himself was arrogant. He despised No. 11’s identity as an immigrant, and was impatient with any reasoning and talking which could prolong this discussion, thus ruin his chance of going to the theatre.

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Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

II. Text Analysis

No. 3 took this opportunity to take revenge on No. 8. No. 3 took this argument very personally. Thus we know that he was narrow-minded. On the other hand, he was biased because No.3 had serious problems with his own son who beat the father up, and he believed the accused boy was just like his own son.

It sounds more like an order, which is not a polite way to speak to other jurors.

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No. 10: … You know how these people lie. It’s born in them… They don’t know what the truth is. And let me tell you. They don’t even need any real big reason to kill someone, either. No sir! That’s the way they are. By nature. Violent!… The kid’s liar. I know it…

Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

II. Text Analysis

In Para. 113

Question: Was No. 10 talking about the facts or opinions? What kind of person was No. 10?

No. 10 was not talking about facts, he was talking about opinions, to be exact, strongly held prejudices.

slide42

No. 4: I’m trying to settle something. Do you mind?

No. 4: If it’s any of your business, I was rubbing it because it bothered me a little.

No. 4: Very annoying.

Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

II. Text Analysis

In Para. 122, 124, 128

Question: How did No. 4’s attitude change from politeness to irony? Pay attention to his tone.

He was getting impatient with No. 9, thus we can observe a shade of irony in his tone: “if it’s any of your business”,“very annoying”

“Very annoying” , a pun, is used ironically to contain two layers of meaning:

one, No. 4 found the two deep impressions beside his nose annoying; the other, he thought No. 9’s persistent interruption was annoying.

slide43

No. 3:…Well, say something! You lousy bunch of bleeding hearts. You’re not going to intimidate me. I’m entitled to my opinion…

Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

II. Text Analysis

in Para. 164

Question:Compare No. 3 and No. 8’s performances in the courtroom. In what way did they impress you?

No. 3 couldn’t get rid of his prejudices against the accused boy, but he based his judgment not on logical reasoning but on emotional associations.

No. 8 successfully brought all other jurors around by persistent efforts, logical reasoning, support and respect he won from other jurors. He was cool, logical and rational.

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By Tom Gardner

Song for Courage

Lesson 6 – Twelve Angry Men (Part Two)

There are those who follow those who take the darker sideIt’s courage that will pull you out if you would just decideand you can be the leader and then those who follow youcan help the lives of others and then they will do it tooLalalalalala…

If you’re going to speak up then SAY SOMETHING

If you’re going to stand up then STAND FOR SOMETHING

If you want to march on then DO SOMETHING

With the courage in your heart

(You’ll find the) courage in your heart

If you’re going to smile then SMILE ON SOMEONE

If you’re going to reach out then TOUCH SOMETHING

If you want to feel good then HELP SOMEONE

Find the courage in your heart

(You’ll find the) courage in your heart