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Introduction to the Los Angeles County Multi-Agency Radiological Response Plan. National Radiological Emergency Preparedness Conference. April 23, 2009. Topics. Who?, What?, When?, Why? Planning Process Objectives MARRP Overview. 30 local, State, and federal agencies and organizations

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introduction to the los angeles county multi agency radiological response plan

Introduction to the Los Angeles CountyMulti-Agency Radiological Response Plan

National Radiological Emergency Preparedness Conference

April 23, 2009

topics
Topics
  • Who?, What?, When?, Why?
  • Planning Process
  • Objectives
  • MARRP Overview
slide3
30 local, State, and federal agencies and organizations

LACo DPH, LACO Fire & Health HazMat, LACo Coroner, LACo DPSS, LACo Sheriffs, LA City Fire & PD, LA Airport, LA Port, Long Beach Fire, Police & Port, CA DPH, CA OES, CHP, USEPA & DOE, FEMA, CST, FBI, USCG, Red Cross

100 technical representatives experienced in emergency operations

MARRP has list of agencies and primary contacts

Who?
slide4
What?
  • Coordination plan for a significantradiological (not nuclear) incident
  • Coordination of response actions between local, State, and federal agencies
  • Does not replace, but supplements, existing plans!
  • Provides guidance to responders and decision makers during an incident
slide5
When?
  • Planning process started December 2007
  • Draft Final Plan completed September 2008
  • Final Plan completed February 2009
slide6
Why?
  • Every agency and organization has their own radiation response plan (fully or not fully developed)
  • Reduce responder confusion
  • Avoid duplication of response efforts
  • Eliminate gaps in response efforts
planning process
Planning Process
  • Three planning committee meetings
    • Purpose, Objectives, Concept of Operations
    • Scope of Radiological Incidents
    • Role and Responsibilities
    • RDD Table-Top Exercise
    • Review of proposed Draft Plan
  • Focused Meetings
    • LACo Fire Department, Health HazMat
    • Red Cross & Department of Public Social Services
  • Final Draft Plan review meeting
guidance plan
Guidance Plan
  • MARRP is not the law or regulation
  • MARRP is not a mandatory plan for responding agencies/organizations
  • MARRP is guidance with specific and detailed recommendations
summary
Summary
  • Intentional or accidental, significant radiological incident
    • Radiological Material Release (RMR)
    • Radiological Exposure Device (RED)
    • Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD)
  • Coordination plan with detailed response action guidance and procedures
    • Uniformity of decision points and contamination release levels
    • Critical decisions
  • Dynamic document that will change as necessary
significant incident
Significant Incident
  • Non-routine or unusual occurrence or catastrophic event
  • Standard resources are insufficient to respond adequately
  • Rule of thumb - incident is significant when multiple agencies are required to mitigate the situation (i.e., multiple local agencies or a mixture of local and State and/or federal agencies)

You’ll know it when you see it!

what is not addressed
What is Not Addressed
  • Preparedness
  • Prevention
  • Recovery
  • Non-radiological incidents (e.g. chemical) and non-radiological hazards (e.g. fire)
  • Nuclear incident
objectives of the marrp
Objectives of the MARRP
  • Describes predefined roles and responsibilities between local, State and federal responding agencies and organizations
  • Comprehensive plan to cover all critical radiological aspects of a response in a “handbook” format (easy to use during an actual incident)
  • Flexible approach for all types of radiological emergencies
  • Provides specific action based guidance
    • Standard Operating Guidance
    • Instructions
    • Forms
goals of the marrp
Goals of the MARRP
  • Save lives and reduce risk to public
  • Reduce responder confusion
  • Avoid/reduce duplication and gaps in response efforts
  • Coordinate response actions
critical decisions
Critical Decisions
  • Decisions are highly dependant on potential or actual dose to:
    • Responders
    • Victims
    • Public
  • Decisions need to be informed based on advanced knowledge of radiation protection
  • Decisions need to be made quickly
critical decisions actions
Critical Decisions & Actions

Public evacuation and/or shelter-in-place

Integration of local, State, and federal agencies and organizations into Incident Command/Unified Command

On-scene mass decontamination or self-decontamination at home

Establishing and maintaining public reception centers

marrp overview
MARRP Overview

The Palladino Company

Slide 16

marrp outline
MARRP Outline
  • Volume I: Responder Field Manual
    • Stand alone manual
    • Designed for responder use during an incident
    • Provides practical guidance to perform specific tasks
    • Provides guidance on responder decision points
    • Provides guidance on contamination release levels for responder/equipment and public/property
  • Volume II: Extended Plan
    • Designed based on an Emergency Operations Plan
    • Provides additional details not found in Volume I
key features
Key Features
  • Detailed guidance and procedures to responders for numerous tasks in 13 Playbooks
  • Information boxes highlight important guidance and facts
  • Compliant with the National Incident Management System (NIMS)

Do NOT delay medical treatment for victims with life- or limb-threatening injuries to conduct decontamination!

volume i responder field manual
Volume I: Responder Field Manual

Information Cards

Summary Tables

Position Job Aids

Activity Playbooks

Standard Operating Guides

Instructions

Forms

Tables

information card first 30 minutes of a radiological response
Information Card: First 30 Minutes of a Radiological Response
  • Rescue victims without exceeding radiation decision points
  • Do not delay medical treatment of victims with life-threatening injuries to perform decontamination
  • Wear a dosimeter if available (not required)
  • Contamination is a secondary concern to critical operations (lifesaving and protection of critical infrastructure)
information card radiological response rules of thumb
Information Card: Radiological Response Rules of Thumb
  • Follow radiation protection principles; i.e., Time, Distance, and Shielding.
  • After an explosion, most airborne radioactive dust will settle to the ground within about 10 to 20 minutes.
  • If a radiation instrument is not available, evacuate to 1,650 feet (500 meters) from the detonation or release site in all directions.
  • Removing outer clothing may eliminate up to 90% of contamination.
information card radiological instrument summary
Information Card: Radiological Instrument Summary
  • Detector: Pancake Geiger-Mueller
  • Detects: Alpha, Beta, Gamma
  • Typical Uses: Contamination surveys
  • Cautions: Not very sensitive to gamma radiation. Detector window has a thin mylar cover that holds a gas inside the detector, if punctured the reading will drop to zero and the detector will not function; it cannot be repaired in the field.
table 2 playbook applicable for radiological incidents partial
Table 2: Playbook Applicable for Radiological Incidents (partial)

RMR: Radiological Materials Release

RED: Radiological Exposure Device

RDD: Radiological Dispersal Device

position job aids
Position Job Aids
  • One page memory aid on radiation issues
    • Incident Commander
    • Operations Section Chief
    • Planning Section Chief
    • Public Information Officer
    • Safety Officer
    • Liaison Officer
    • Decontamination Team Leader
playbooks
Playbooks
  • 13 playbooks for major radiological related activities
  • Designed as stand alone documents
  • Content
    • Activity
    • Resources
    • What to do
    • Considerations
    • Tables
    • Standard Operating Guides
    • Instructions
    • Forms
13 playbooks
13 Playbooks
  • Exclusion zone operations
  • Initial incident control zones
  • Monitor responders and equipment for contamination
  • Monitor injured victims for contamination
  • Monitor uninjured victims for contamination
  • Conduct advanced radiation measurements
  • Determine presence or absence of alpha radiation
13 playbooks1
13 Playbooks
  • Conduct crime scene investigations in the Exclusion Zone and Extreme Caution Areas
  • Monitor people for contamination at public reception centers
  • Monitor public property for contamination
  • Determine need for and recommend protective actions for the public, including advice for evacuation and shelter-in-place
  • Control traffic in contaminated areas, create responder access corridors, and establish evacuation routes
  • Conduct critical hospital-based operations
standard operating guides
Standard Operating Guides

Procedure for Performing a Radiation Contamination Survey

How to Distinguish Between Alpha, Beta, and Gamma Radiation Using a Pancake Geiger-Mueller Survey Meter

instructions
Instructions
  • Public Waiting for Decontamination
  • Instructions to Public on How to Perform Decontamination at Home
  • Instructions to Public on How to Perform Decontamination of Pets
table 4 decision points
Table 4: Decision Points
  • Decision points for dose to responders
table 6 responder alarm levels
Table 6: Responder Alarm Levels

Suggested alarm levels for instruments or personal dosimeters

It will be less confusing if everyone has the same alarm set points

volume ii extended plan
Volume II: Extended Plan
  • Section 1: Introduction
  • Section 2: Basic Plan
  • Section 3: Response Planning Guides (Extended Playbooks)
  • Section 4: References
  • Attachments
next steps
Next Steps
  • RDD Table Top Exercise on Feb 25, 2009
  • Functional Exercise (date undetermined)
  • Full Scale Exercise (date undetermined)
  • Review and adoption of MARRP by participating agencies and organizations
contact information
Contact Information

Carl Palladino

The Palladino Company, Inc.

720 Fillmore Street

San Francisco, CA 94117

Phone: (415) 861-1945

Fax: (415) 869-6625

Mobile: (415) 336-1556

Email: cpalladino@palladinocompany.com

contact information1
Contact Information

Jeff Day

Los Angeles County Radiation Management

3530 Wilshire Blvd, 9th Floor

Los Angeles, CA 90010

Phone: (213) 351-7393

Fax: (213) 351-2718

Mobile: (323) 384-8957

Email: jsday@ph.lacounty.gov

questions
Questions?

The Palladino Company

Slide 42