guidelines to lower risk of drug nutrient interactions n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Guidelines to Lower Risk of Drug-Nutrient Interactions PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Guidelines to Lower Risk of Drug-Nutrient Interactions

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 38

Guidelines to Lower Risk of Drug-Nutrient Interactions - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 230 Views
  • Uploaded on

Guidelines to Lower Risk of Drug-Nutrient Interactions. Presented by Janice Hermann, PhD, RD/LD OCES Adult and Older Adult Nutrition Specialist. Types of Interactions. Drug-Nutrient Interactions Effect of a medication on food or a nutrient in food

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Guidelines to Lower Risk of Drug-Nutrient Interactions' - giona


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
guidelines to lower risk of drug nutrient interactions

Guidelines to Lower Risk of Drug-Nutrient Interactions

Presented by

Janice Hermann, PhD, RD/LD

OCES Adult and Older Adult Nutrition Specialist

types of interactions
Types of Interactions
  • Drug-Nutrient Interactions
    • Effect of a medication on food or a nutrient in food
    • Both prescription and over-the-counter medications can affect the way your body uses nutrients in food
  • Nutrient-Drug Interactions
    • Effect of food or a nutrient in food on a medication
nutrition implications
Nutrition Implications
  • Little chance taking a medication for a short time will affect your nutritional status
  • However, using some medications for months or years may affect your nutritional health
    • Changing diet to include more foods rich in vitamins and minerals is preferred to taking vitamin or mineral supplements
drug nutrient interactions
Drug-Nutrient Interactions
  • Medications, can affect nutrients by:
    • Decreasing food intake
    • Decreasing nutrient absorption
    • Slowing down nutrient production
    • Interfering with nutrient metabolism
    • Increasing nutrient excretion
drug nutrient interactions food intake
Drug-Nutrient Interactions:Food Intake
  • Some medications can affect nutritional health by causing poor food intake due to:
    • Decreased appetite
    • Nausea or vomiting
    • Unpleasant taste or dry mouth
    • Gastrointestinal sores or inflammation
drug nutrient interactions food intake1
Drug-Nutrient Interactions:Food Intake
  • Many medications may cause loss of appetite or nausea in some people, but it usually subsides after the first few doses
  • However, nutritional health can be affected if decreased food intake persists
drug nutrient interactions food intake2
Drug-Nutrient Interactions:Food Intake
  • Examples:
    • Appetite suppressants are medications which affect food intake by depressing appetite
    • Several cancer medications and treatments may dramatically reduce food intake by causing:
      • Loss of appetite
      • Changes in taste perception
      • Nausea, vomiting
      • Dry mouth
      • Mouth and intestinal sores or inflammation
drug nutrient interactions nutrient absorption
Drug-Nutrient Interactions:Nutrient Absorption
  • Some medications can affect nutritional health by decreasing nutrient absorption due to:
    • Decreasing time in intestine
    • Altering stomach acidity
    • Damaging intestinal lining
    • Competing for absorption
    • Binding nutrients
drug nutrient interactions nutrient absorption1
Drug-Nutrient Interactions:Nutrient Absorption
  • Examples:
    • Laxatives can cause food to move rapidly through the intestinal track which can decrease nutrient absorption
    • Antacids can lower stomach acidity which can may interfere with iron, folate and vitamin B12 absorption
    • Many cancer medications and treatments can damage the intestinal lining which can decrease nutrient absorption
drug nutrient interactions nutrient absorption cont
Drug-Nutrient Interactions:Nutrient Absorption (cont.)
  • Examples:
    • Some anticonvulsants can compete for absorption with folate resulting in decreased folateabsorption
    • Some cholesterol lowering medications reduce cholesterol by removing bile acids
      • Bile acids are needed to absorb essential fatty acids and fat-soluble vitamins
      • As a result some cholesterol lowering medications can reduce absorption of fat-soluble nutrients
drug nutrient interactions nutrient production
Drug-Nutrient Interactions:Nutrient Production
  • Some medications can affect nutritional health by slowing down nutrient production
drug nutrient interactions nutrient production1
Drug-Nutrient Interactions:Nutrient Production
  • Vitamin K produced by bacteria in the intestine
  • Antibiotics kill harmful bacteria, but they can also kill helpful bacteria
    • Killing helpful vitamin K producing bacteria can result in decreased vitamin K production
drug nutrient interactions nutrient metabolism
Drug-Nutrient Interactions:Nutrient Metabolism
  • Some medications can affect nutritional health by interfering with body’s ability to metabolize nutrients due to:
    • Affecting enzyme systems
    • Competing with enzyme systems
drug nutrient interactions nutrient metabolism1
Drug-Nutrient Interactions:Nutrient Metabolism
  • Examples:
    • Some anticonvulsants alter liver enzyme activity causing increased metabolism of folate, vitamin D, and vitamin K
    • Methotrexate resembles folate in structure and competes with enzymes that converts folate to its active form, this can result in folate deficiency
drug nutrient interactions nutrient excretion
Drug-Nutrient Interactions:Nutrient Excretion
  • Some medications can affect nutritional health by increasing nutrient excretion due to:
    • Decreased kidney reabsorption
    • Increased urinary excretion
drug nutrient interactions nutrient excretion1
Drug-Nutrient Interactions:Nutrient Excretion
  • Diuretics remove excess fluid from the body
    • Some diuretics may also increase loss of potassium along with fluids
    • Potassium is very important in proper functioning of the heart and other muscles
  • Large amounts of aspirin can cause increased loss of folate
drug nutrient interactions nutrient excretion2
Drug-Nutrient Interactions:Nutrient Excretion
  • Examples:
    • Some anticonvulsant medications can cause the liver to increase removal of vitamin D from the body
    • Isoniazid, an antituberculosis medication, is similar in structure to vitamin B6 and induces vitamin B6 excretion
      • Since treatment is for 6 months, B6 supplements are routinely given to prevent deficiency
food drug interactions
Food-Drug Interactions
  • Some foods or nutrients in food can also alter a medication’s effectiveness by:
    • Decreasing medication absorption
    • Interfering with medication metabolism
    • Interfering with medication removal
nutrient interactions medication absorption
Nutrient Interactions:Medication Absorption
  • Some foods or nutrients in food can increase or decrease medication absorption by:
    • Decreasing stomach emptying
    • Binding to medications
    • Competing for absorption
    • Altering acidity
nutrient interactions medication absorption1
Nutrient Interactions:Medication Absorption
  • Absorbing less than the intended dose lowers the chance a medication will work properly
  • Absorbing more than the intended dose increases the chance of an overdose effect
nutrient interactions medication absorption2
Nutrient Interactions:Medication Absorption
  • Medications are typically absorbed more quickly when the stomach is empty
  • Having food in the stomach typically will slow down a medications absorption
nutrient interactions medication absorption3
Nutrient Interactions:Medication Absorption
  • Some medication should be taken with food
  • Some medication should be taken on an empty stomach (1 hour before or 2 hours after eating)
  • Read the directions to see if a medication should or should not be taken with food
nutrient interactions medication absorption4
Nutrient Interactions:Medication Absorption
  • Examples:
    • Dietary calcium can bind to the antibiotic tetracycline making it unavailable for absorption
    • Amino acids compete for absorption with levodopa
nutrient interactions medication absorption5
Nutrient Interactions:Medication Absorption
  • Examples:
    • Acidity of food or beverage consumed with a medication can affect absorption
      • Some medications are better absorbed in an acidic environment
      • Other medications can be damaged by an acid environment, these types of medications are often available in coated forms to resist stomach acidity
food drug interactions medication metabolism
Food-Drug Interactions:Medication Metabolism
  • Some foods or nutrients in foods may interfere with a medication’s metabolism or action in the body by:
    • Affecting enzyme systems
    • Interacting with medications
    • Having a similar chemical structure resulting in competition
food drug interactions medication metabolism1
Food-Drug Interactions:Medication Metabolism
  • Examples:
    • Components in grapefruit juice
      • Inactivate enzymes that metabolize many medications which can result in increased medication levels
    • Aged and fermented foods
      • Contain a chemical called tyramine that interacts with a medication, monoamine oxidaseinhibitor, which can result in dangerously high blood pressure
    • Vitamin K
      • Structurally similar to the anticoagulant warfarin which can decrease the effectiveness of warfarin
food drug interactions medication removal
Food-Drug Interactions:Medication Removal
  • Some food or nutrients in foods may interfere with removal of a medication from the body by:
    • Affecting enzymes involved in preparing medications for removal
    • Altering urine pH
food drug interactions medication removal1
Food-Drug Interactions:Medication Removal
  • Examples
    • Liver enzymes prepare medications for removal from the body
      • These enzymes require nutrients to work properly
      • If nutrients are not present the medication may stay active in the body longer than intended
    • Quinidine is excreted more readily in an acidic urine
      • Foods that cause the urine to be more basic, such as sodium bicarbonate, may reduce quinidineexcretion
many medications
Many Medications
  • These are just a few examples to understand how medications and nutrients can interact, this is not indented to be a complete list of possible interactions
  • There are thousands of medications on the market and numerous new medications that come out ever year
alcohol interacts with medications
Alcohol Interacts With Medications
  • Alcohol and medications do not mix
  • Alcohol can adversely affect medications
    • Alcohol can slow down or speed up how the body metabolizes a medication
      • Medication action can be either intensified or reduced
    • In some cases, mixing alcohol and medications can be fatal
alcohol interacts with medications1
Alcohol Interacts With Medications
  • A rule of thumb is to avoid alcoholic beverages when taking prescription and over-the-counter medications
nutrient supplements
Nutrient Supplements
  • Nutrient supplements themselves can result in drug-nutrient interactions
  • In excessive amounts, vitamin and mineral supplements can act like drugs instead of nutrients
  • Nutrients in excessive amounts may:
    • Compete with other nutrients for absorption, transport or metabolism
    • Have a direct overdose effect
follow directions
Follow Directions
  • It is very important to follow the directions on how to take a medication
  • Many people do not take prescription or over-the-counter medications properly
  • Following directions on how to take a medication can affect how or if a medication will work properly
who is at greater risk
Who Is At Greater Risk
  • Persons who are poorly nourished
  • Persons with serious health problems
  • Growing children
  • Pregnant women
  • Older adults
who is at greater risk cont
Who Is At Greater Risk (cont.)
  • Persons taking two or more medications at the same time
  • Persons using prescription and over-the-counter medications together
  • Persons not following medication directions
  • Persons taking medications for long periods of time
  • Persons who drink alcohol excessively
lower the risk of drug nutrient interactions
Lower The Risk of Drug-Nutrient Interactions
  • Eat a healthy diet
  • Follow directions on how to take medications
    • Both prescription and over-the-counter
  • Read warning labels
  • Do not share medications
lower the risk of drug nutrient interactions cont
Lower The Risk of Drug-Nutrient Interactions (cont.)
  • Tell your physician all the medications you are taking both prescription and over-the-counter
  • Tell your physician and pharmacist about any new symptoms that develop when taking a medication
  • Keep a list of all medications
  • Ask if you have any questions
questions to ask your physician
Questions To Ask Your Physician
  • What is the medication for?
    • Medication name
    • Medication purpose
  • How should I take the medication?
    • How often, how long
    • How to store
    • Recommendations on consuming food and/or beverages with medication
  • What should I expect?
    • Expected outcomes
    • Precautions
    • Side-effects