types of poems n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Types of Poems PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Types of Poems

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 12

Types of Poems - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 124 Views
  • Uploaded on

Types of Poems . Poetry can take many different forms. Each comes with it’s own unique rules and limitations that can affect numerous elements. . Let’s take a look at some of the more popular types of poems and their various restrictions, limitations, criteria, etc. Identifying the Types.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Types of Poems' - geri


Download Now An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide2
Poetry can take many different forms. Each comes with it’s own unique rules and limitations that can affect numerous elements.
slide3
Let’s take a look at some of the more popular types of poems and their various restrictions, limitations, criteria, etc.

Identifying the Types

slide4

Free Verse is a form of poetry which uses fewer rules and limitations using either rhymed or unrhymed lines that have no set fixed metrical pattern. The early 20th-century poets were the first to write what they called "free verse" which allowed them to break from the formula and rigidity of traditional poetry.

Free Verse

example of free verse
Example of Free Verse

Fog

The fog comes

on little cat feet.

It sits looking

over harbour and city

on silent haunches

and then moves on.

Carl Sandburg

slide6

A Shakespearean, or English, sonnet consists of 14 lines, each line containing ten syllables and written in iambic pentameter, in which a pattern of an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable is repeated five times. The rhyme scheme in a Shakespearean sonnet is a-b-a-b, c-d-c-d, e-f-e-f, g-g; the last two lines are a rhyming couplet.

Sonnet

example of a shakespearean sonnet
Example of a Shakespearean Sonnet

Sonnet #71

No longer mourn for me when I am deadThan you shall hear the surly sullen bellGive warning to the world that I am fledFrom this vile world with vilest worms to dwell:Nay, if you read this line, remember notThe hand that writ it, for I love you so,That I in your sweet thoughts would be forgot,If thinking on me then should make you woe.O! if, I say, you look upon this verse,When I perhaps compounded am with clay,Do not so much as my poor name rehearse;But let your love even with my life decay;Lest the wise world should look into your moan,And mock you with me after I am gone.

William Shakespeare

slide8

Sonnet

A Petrarchan, or Italian, sonnet also consists of 14 lines, each line containing ten syllables and written in iambic pentameter, but is broken into two distinct sections with their own rhyme scheme:The first 8 lines in a Petrarchan sonnet (called the octave) is a-b-b-a, a-b-b-a, while the remaining six line (called the sestet) is made up of two or three rhyming soundsc-d-c-d-c-d, c-d-d-c-d-c, c-d-e-c-d-e, c-d-e-c-d-e, c-d-e-c-e-d, or c-d-c-e-d-c

example of a petrarchan sonnet
Example of a Petrarchan Sonnet

On His BlindnessWhen I consider how my light is spent, Ere half my days, in this dark world and wide, And that one Talent which is death to hide, Lodg'd with me useless, though my Soul more bent To serve therewith my Maker, and present My true account, least he returning chide, Doth God exact day-labour, light deny'd, I fondly ask; But patience to prevent That murmur, soon replies, God doth not need Either man's work or his own gifts, who best Bar his mildeyoak, they serve him best, his State Is Kingly. Thousands at his bidding speed And post o're Land and Ocean without rest: They also serve who only stand and waite.

John Milton

identify this sonnet
Identify this Sonnet…

Death be not proud

Death, be not proud, though some have called thee

Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so;

For those whom thou think'st thou dost overthrow

Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me.

From rest and sleep, which but thy pictures be,

Much pleasure; then from thee much more must flow,

And soonest our best men with thee do go,

Rest of their bones, and soul's delivery.

Thou art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men,

And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell,

And poppy or charms can make us sleep as well

And better than thy stroke; why swell'st thou then?

One short sleep past, we wake eternally

And death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt die.

John Donne

slide11

A typical ballad is a plot-driven song, with one or more characters hurriedly unfurling events leading to a dramatic conclusion. At best, a ballad does not tell the reader what’s happening, but rather shows the reader what’s happening, describing each crucial moment in the trail of events. The ballad is often constructed in quatrain stanzas, each line containing as few as three or four stresses and rhyming either the second and fourth lines, or all alternating lines.

Ballad

example of a ballad
Example of a Ballad

Rime of the Ancient Mariner

It is an ancient marinerAnd he stoppeth one of three.--"By thy long grey beard and glittering eye, Now wherefore stoppest thou me?The bridegroom's doors are opened wide,And I am next of kin;The guests are met, the feast is set:Mayst hear the merry din."He holds him with his skinny hand, "There was a ship," quoth he."Hold off! unhand me, grey-beard loon!" Eftsoons his hand dropped he.He holds him with his glittering eye-- The wedding-guest stood still,And listens like a three-years' child:The mariner hath his will.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge