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DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION STRATEGIES. Enrichment for Advanced Learners Presented by Your Gifted Services Team. Your Gifted Services/ Project Excel Team. Asst. Superintendent Walter Davis – Director of Teaching and Learning Karen Rumley – District Coordinator, High School GIS

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differentiated instruction strategies
DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION STRATEGIES

Enrichment for Advanced Learners

Presented by

Your Gifted Services Team

your gifted services project excel team
Your Gifted Services/ Project Excel Team
  • Asst. Superintendent Walter Davis – Director of Teaching and Learning
  • Karen Rumley – District Coordinator, High School GIS
  • Kathryn Craig – Middle School GIS
  • Cheryl Beisel – GIS: Pull-out housed at Lincoln, and Enrichment at Lincoln and Preston
  • Leslie Evanoski – GIS: Enrichment at DeWitt, Price, Richardson, Silver Lake
why should we differentiate
WHY should we Differentiate?
  • Read case study in groups
    • How might you differentiate:
      • Instruction
      • Assessment
      • Environment
  • Why do/ would YOU differentiate for your Gifted Students?
step one pre assessment
STEP ONE: PRE-ASSESSMENT!!!

WHAT do they ALREADY know? (content, skills, etc.)

WHAT can they LEARN MORE QUICKLY than classmates?

WHAT background is needed to understand the lesson– who has it & who does not?

Learning Styles/ Preferences

Interest Inventories

Other?

pre assessment considerations
PRE-ASSESSMENT Considerations

WHO

Whole class

Small Group

Individual

HOW

Pre-tests

Interest Inventories

Informal

super resource
SUPER RESOURCE!!!!!
  • ODE JAVITS PROJECT:

I Get GT-Ed

  • Moodle- Based Resources for Gifted Practitioners!
  • Teacher Module: http://javits.etech.ohio.gov/user/view.php?id=5053&course=2
  • Register to Log in for first time.
menus rubrics and learning style inventories

MENUS, RUBRICS, and LEARNING STYLE INVENTORIES

Add CHOICE and VARIETY to a lesson

how to create and use an extension menu
How to Create and Use anExtension Menu
  • Extension Menu :an array of independent learning activities presented in a 2x2, 2x3, or 3x3 format (boxes) to provide students with choices for extending or enriching the essential curriculum.
  • Purposes of Extension Menus
    • Enrich or extend the essential curriculum
    • Challenge the abilities of highly able students
    • Provide alternative activities that address the differing abilities, interests, or learning styles of students
  • FCPS Office of Gifted and Talented Education 9/16/04
think abouts for creating an extension menu
“Think Abouts”for Creating an Extension Menu
    • Essential curriculum standard(s) and indicator(s) upon which the extension menu will be based
    • Rigorous tasks that extend the lesson/unit and can challenge students with 20 minutes or more of independent learning
    • Appropriate levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy to be addressed
    • Assessment and Evaluation Criteria
    • Appropriate number of learning activities (boxes) to include in the extension menu
      • Newly oriented students should be offered 2-4 boxes
      • Experienced students may be offered 6-9 boxes
  • FCPS Office
creating extension menus
CreatingExtension Menus

Develop learning activities at the appropriate and different levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Number or letter boxes so that activities can be assigned or recommended to students based on their abilities, interests or learning styles.

Consider designating one box “Write your idea here” so that a child can use creativity to develop his/her own learning activity. Approve each self-designed learning activity before the student pursues it.

Develop rubrics, as needed, for learning activities provided in the extension menu.

Develop a Student/Parent/Teacher Learning Contract. This allows students and parents and teachers to think realistically about how the student can be successful. For example, a student may chose to create a video, but does he have the resources available?

options for assessing and evaluating student work on extension menus
Options for Assessing and EvaluatingStudent Work on Extension Menus
  • Rubrics should be developed for some of the learning activities as appropriate.
  • Students who have compacted out of the curriculum may earn the equivalent value of regular classroom assignments by completing extension menu activities.
  • Extra credit points may be awarded to students who successfully complete certain learning activities.
  • Providing the time for students to present theirwork is essential.
          • Bibliography
  • Tomlinson, Carol Ann, The Differentiated Classroom Responding to the Needs of all Learners. Alexandria: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 1999.
  • Winebrenner, Susan. Teaching Gifted Kids in the Regular Classroom. Minneapolis: Free Spirit Publishing Inc., 1992.
example of extension menu
Example of Extension Menu
  • Jumping the Nail- Grade 8
  • Project Choice Menu
  • Learning Outcome: You have completed reading Jumping the Nail. The novel encompassed challenges and possible responses to peer pressure. Your assignment will be to demonstrate a text-to-self or text-to-world connection and understanding of peer pressures middle- schoolers face. You may complete this project as an individual or as part of a small group (four members, maximum, please). Here are your choices:
learning contract
Learning Contract

I have chosen to complete project # ___.

I will complete this project □ independently/□ with peers.

Peers I am working with are:________________________

I have discussed my choices with my teacher and my parents, and I feel as though I will be able to manage my time to complete these projects on the due date of____________________.

Student Signature:________________________

Parent/Guardian Signature:_______________________

Teacher Signature:______________________________

resources
Resources:

Teaching Gifted Kids in the Regular Classroom...by Susan Winebrenner

So Each May Learn: Integrating Learning Styles And Multiple Intelligences by Harvey Silver and Richard Strong

What To Do When Gifted Kids Don’t Have all the Answers

by James R. Delisle

curriculum compacting eliminates repetition
CURRICULUM COMPACTINGEliminatesREPETITION

Identify content or skills focused on in a unit

Pretest to see what the student already knows

Provide alternate tasks to extend learning and eliminate repetition

steps for compacting
Steps for Compacting
  • Identify learning objectives
  • Find or develop pre-test format
  • Pre-test student
  • Eliminate practice and instructional time
  • Streamline instruction or assignments
  • Offer enrichment or acceleration options
  • Keep records of progress and instructional options offered
alternate activities
Alternate Activities
  • Teacher selected activities
  • Student selected activities
  • A combination of the above
  • Tic-Tac-Toe menu of activities
  • Same content or skill at a more complex level
  • Specific independent study
record keeping
Record Keeping
  • Keep compactor in a binder. Keeping these record supports and justifies the curricular adjustments made and explains why the student is doing an alternate task. The records also help parents to understand what you are doing. Also have a contract with the child so the student understands expectations and consequences if the child does not follow the plan
independent study learning centers

INDEPENDENT STUDY& LEARNING CENTERS

Allow for CHOICE, EXTENSION, REMEDIATION, and PERSONAL INTEREST

tiered lessons

TIERED LESSONS

Alter the DEPTH of a lesson

1 determine
1. Determine
  • WHAT the OUTCOME of the Lesson is to be…
    • Skill-based
    • Content-based
    • Performance-based
  • WHAT BACKGROUND some students may need to reach outcome
  • WHAT EXTENSION some students may pursue if they have mastered outcome

“READY-TO-GO”

“NOT-YET-READY”

“READY-TO-GO-FURTHER”

slide25

WHOLE GROUP

    • Introduction
    • Instruction (can some kids skip this?)
  • DIFFERENTIATED OUTCOMES (examples)
    • Vary depth
    • Adjust abstraction or complexity or sophistication
    • Adjust pace
    • More or less familiar content
    • More or less advanced resources
    • More or less scaffolding
    • Amount of feedback/ monitoring
    • Provide/ let students infer related strategies
    • Provide more/ fewer examples
    • Require more/ less evidence
    • Require more/ less independence/ collaboration
slide26
If Assigning Tier, PREASSESS to determine appropriate placement

Or, allow student to CHOOSE Tier

variations
Variations
  • STUDENTS AWARE?
  • STUDENTS NOT AWARE?
  • Groups do different activities
  • Individuals do different activities
  • Individuals choose to work at preferred activity/ level? Assigned?
  • CONSIDER:
    • Graded Assessment?
    • Long-term/ Short term?
    • Resources?
    • Sharing outcomes/ products?
assessments
Assessments
  • Accurate completion of what is assigned earns points?
  • Progressive completion of tiers earns additional points?
  • Students complete TWO levels out of 3 points (demonstrate mastery of middle/ “on target” earns points) – Great idea for tests/ quizzes!!
  • Wow Points on a rubric- encourage “Stretch”
  • Encourage SAFE stretching
save your sanity
Save your Sanity…

START

SIMPLE,

SMALL,

SLOW!

thank you
THANK YOU!!!

What Questions do YOU have???

Please feel free to contact us!!

Leslie Evanoski: Enrichment at DeWitt, Price, Richardson, and Silver Lake cf_evanoski@cfalls.org

Cheryl Beisel: Enrichment & Pull-Out at Lincoln and Preston cf_beisel@cfalls.org

Kathryn Craig– Project Excel at Bolich and Roberts Middle Schools cf_craigk@cfalls.org, http://teacherweb.com/oh/cuyahogafalls/craig/

Karen Rumley– District Gifted Coordinator, HS Gifted Intervention Specialist cf_rumley@cfalls.org