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Data Collecting, Organizing & Analyzing. VARIABLES & DATA TABLES. In an experiment there are 2 types of variables INDEPENDENT VARIABLES & DEPENDANT VARIABLES. a VARIABLE is any factor, or thing that can change during your experiment.

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Data collecting organizing analyzing


Data collecting organizing analyzing

  • a VARIABLE is any factor, or thing that can change during your experiment


Data collecting organizing analyzing

  • a CONTROLED experiment only has 1 variable changing, or being tested

  • Sometimes a control trial or group is used to compare experimental data to


Independent variable
INDEPENDENTVARIABLE

  • This is the variable we can control in an experiment.

  • Independent variables are set up ahead of time, before you start following your procedures


Independent variable1
INDEPENDENTVARIABLE

  • In a “T” table, or data table, this variable is on the left side.

  • On a graph, this variable goes on the X axis


Independent variable2
INDEPENDENT VARIABLE

  • Examples of common Independent variables:

    • Time-measure every 30 seconds, every day, etc.

    • Distance-measure every 0.5 meters, every 10.0 cm

    • Amount-add 2.0 grams each trial


Independent variable3
INDEPENDENTVARIABLE

  • Your book calls the independent variable the MANIPULATED variable, because we manipulate or set it to our specifications


Dependent variable
DEPENDENTVARIABLE

  • This is the variable we have to observe in an experiment.

  • Dependent variables are measured during the experiment, after you start following your procedures


Dependent variable1
DEPENDENTVARIABLE

  • In a “T” table, or data table, this variable is on the right side.

  • On a graph, this variable goes on the Y axis


Dependent variable2
DEPENDENT VARIABLE

  • Examples of common Dependent variables:

    • Temperature-record the temperature

    • Mass-find the mass of each object or substance

    • Amount-count the resulting number of items


Dependent variable3
DEPENDENTVARIABLE

  • Your book calls the dependent variable the RESPONDING variable, because it responds to the procedure you are following. We can’t chose what the data will be.




7 rules of graphing
7 RULES OF GRAPHING

  • Follow these simple rules for GREAT GRAPHS


Rule 1
RULE # 1.

  • 1. Always draw neat lines with a straight edge or ruler


Rule 2
RULE # 2.

  • Make your graph 1/2 page or 1 full page in size.

  • Small graphs are too difficult to read patterns or results of your experiment.


Rule 3
RULE # 3.

  • Label the x-axis (goes across the bottom of your graph)

  • Label the y-axis ( the line that goes up & down on the left side of your graph)


Rule 4
RULE # 4.

  • Label three places on your graph.

  • 1. TITLE the graph descriptively

  • WHAT DOES YOUR GRAPH SHOW US?


Rule 41
RULE # 4.

  • 2. label the x-axis with the independent variable

    • this is the variable you pre-set before you began collecting data, on the left side of a “T” table

    • common independent variables can be time, or distances


Rule 42
RULE # 4.

  • 3. label the y-axis with the dependent variable

    • this is the variable you measure when you begin collecting data, on the right side of a “T” table

    • common dependent variables can be mass, or temperature


Rule 5
RULE # 5.

  • Number the x and y axis with a regular numerical sequence or pattern starting with 0 to space out your data so it fills the entire graph

    • examples: 0, 5, 10, 15 . . .

    • 0, 2, 4, 6, . ., 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0


Rule 6
RULE # 6.

  • Number the x and y axis on the lines of the graph, not the spaces between the lines


Rule 7
RULE # 7.

  • If your graph shows more than one trial of data, or has more than 1 line, USE A KEY

  • A key can be different colored lines, lines with different textures or patterns.


The end

The End

Good Luck and Happy Data Collecting!