slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Promote Professional Policing Campaign Institute for Security Studies July – August 2012 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Promote Professional Policing Campaign Institute for Security Studies July – August 2012

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 14

Promote Professional Policing Campaign Institute for Security Studies July – August 2012 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 98 Views
  • Uploaded on

Promote Professional Policing Campaign Institute for Security Studies July – August 2012. Nature of campaign. In September 2011 the campaign was launched with participation of the SAPS national office.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

Promote Professional Policing Campaign Institute for Security Studies July – August 2012


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. Promote Professional Policing Campaign Institute for Security Studies July – August 2012

    2. Nature of campaign • In September 2011 the campaign was launched with participation of the SAPS national office. • In March 2012 the Western Cape Department of Community Safety decided to introduce the campaign across the 25 safety clusters. • Campaign to be based on collaborative work sessions informing its practical content.

    3. Campaign Objectives • Enhancing community awareness and support for a professional policing culture to ensure safe and secure neighbourhoods. • Enhancing community support for the rewarding of professional policing. • Improving the current reporting of poor police service delivery and criminality. • Promoting a proud police service that is accountable to the public.

    4. Communities and policing • Police require community support in order to be effective in their work. • Communities should know what they can and can’t expect from the police. • Police win community support when they are perceived as courteous and fair. • Where are we on the line between being ‘problem solvers’ and ‘crimefighters’?

    5. Barriers? • There is always a barrier between police and communities but the lower this is the better for all. • Many victims of police abuse fail to report it. • Most recipients of good police service fail to express their appreciation.

    6. Corruption • Police corruption is found in virtually all countries, in all forces, and at every level of the organisation at some time. • Corruption involves: • The misuse of police authority for personal or group gain. • The abuse of position • Not all police abuse of power is criminal • Corruption is the opposite of professional policing.

    7. Police corruption as an occupational hazard • Corruption = monopoly + discretion – accountability • Corruption needs: (1) Authority and (2) Opportunity Decades of international research on police corruption has found: • It takes many forms and changes over time • It typically involves group behavior and can easily become systemic • The extent of corruption is connected to organisational and managerial shortcomings • The key difference between policing agencies is the extent of the problem.

    8. Police corruption: the fertilizers 1. Environmental Factors • Marginalised groups (undocumented foreign nationals) • Organised Crime & illicit markets (illegal alcohol, drugs, gambling) • Inappropriate political interference in the police service 2. Organisational • Inadequate police leadership • Poor management and supervision (recruitment, training, promotions & career-paths, weak discipline & internal accountability, etc.) • Police culture (e.g. “Blue code of silence”) 3. Individual • Incongruent personal attitudes and behaviour • Low morale • Financial mismanagement

    9. Discussing strategies • A campaign designed by stations and clusters. • Workable in the cluster context using available resources. • Responsive to public perception and police morale. • Using a collaborative approach between CPFs, stations and communities. • To actively recognise and promote professional policing and to reduce poor policing & criminality

    10. What’s left today? • Group discussion: rewarding good policing • Feedback • Group discussion: reporting bad policing • Feedback • Promoting Professional Policing …

    11. Rewarding good policing • Currently how do you reward good policing? • What policing should be rewarded or appreciated? • How can we PRACTICALLY & APPROPRIATELY reward good policing?

    12. Report bad policing • Currently how do you report bad policing? • What should be reported as bad policing? • How can we PRACTICALLY & APPROPRIATELY report bad policing?

    13. Downloadable Products • Downloadable products: • ‘Reward a cop’ • ‘Report a cop’ • ‘What to expect when reporting’ • ‘SAPS Codes’ • ‘SAPS Offences’ • Guides to support individuals, communities, but also formal oversight structures • Podcasts

    14. Thank You www.issafrica.org/crimehub