Emily bronte when i shall sleep
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Emily Bronte "When I Shall Sleep". Class Analyses. These lines are taken from Emily Bronte’s “When I Shall Sleep.” It was written in the Victorian Era. She was a poet and a novelist too. She is best known for her novel “Wuthering Heights.”

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Emily bronte when i shall sleep

  • These lines are taken from Emily Bronte’s “When I Shall Sleep.” It was written in the Victorian Era. She was a poet and a novelist too. She is best known for her novel “Wuthering Heights.”

  • There are many Victorian glimpses throughout the poem. First, there is a sense of skepticism, for example, “No threatened hell, with quenchless fires,/ Subdue this quenchless will!” ( 7:8). Second, there is a sense of realism, for example, “Mypresententity!’’ (16). Third, thereis a sense of intellectual and spiritual doubt, for example, "Oh, for the day when I shall rest,/ And never suffer more!” (19:20).


Emily bronte when i shall sleep

  • There are many stylistic devices in the poem. First, there is metaphor, for example, “when I shall sleep” (1). Second, there is a sad and mournful tone, for example, “Oh, for the time when in my breast/ Their struggles will be o'er!” (17:18). Third, there is inversion, for example, “So said I, and still say the same;/ Still, to my death, will say” (9:10).