Historical view
Download
1 / 28

Historical view - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 143 Views
  • Updated On :

Historical view. Psychology come from the study of two disparate yet connected fields, Philosophy and biology. Modern View. Psychology is the study of behavior (in its broadest context). Philosophical view. The Platonic allegory of Cupid and Psyche, the passions that rule mankind.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Historical view' - gaura


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Historical view l.jpg
Historical view

  • Psychology come from the study of two disparate yet connected fields, Philosophy and biology.


Modern view l.jpg
Modern View

  • Psychology is the study of behavior (in its broadest context).


Philosophical view l.jpg
Philosophical view

  • The Platonic allegory of Cupid and Psyche, the passions that rule mankind.


Two ways at looking at man and how he interprets his world l.jpg
Two ways at looking at man and how he interprets his world

  • Socratic/Platonic view.

  • All knowledge is already contained in the individual.

  • Do not use your sensory experience to understand the world around you.


Meno s slave l.jpg
Meno’s Slave

  • Through question and answer Socrates showed that an untrained slave could show he understood the relationship between the hypotenuse and the two sides of a square.


Cave allegory l.jpg
Cave allegory

  • Prisoners are chained to a wall.

  • They see shadows on the wall and depict this as real.

  • The shadows are only reflections of people before a fire outside the mouth of the cave.

  • Sensory experience causes illusions.


Aristotle l.jpg
Aristotle

  • Use your sensory experience.

  • Tend to agree in most matters with Plato


Classical religious people l.jpg
Classical religious people

  • The soul as seen from the hands of Augustine.

  • For Augustine, it is virtually axiomatic that the human soul is both immaterial and immortal.


Augustine cont l.jpg
Augustine (cont.)

  • It is clear that Augustine is provides a dramatic account of moral transformation, one that stresses the role of intellectual discernment while at the same time highlighting his conviction that no amount of discernment is sufficient to account for what we might refer to, for want of a better phrase, as the phenomenology of internal moral conflict.


The concept of will l.jpg
The concept of Will

  • In terms of this agonistic inner turmoil, the will is both present and emergent and is on an equal footing with our powers of rational discernment.


Aquinas l.jpg
Aquinas

  • Man not only is intelligible but also intelligent; he is intelligent, because he make intelligent operations. The principle of these intelligent operations, therefore, must be the soul itself and not a separate intellect.

  • The form for man is one as is the form for any individual thing; in man this form is the rational soul. It is the principle of all operations, whether material or spiritual.


The issue for psychology l.jpg
The issue for Psychology

  • What distinguishes the barbarian from non-barbarian?



What is the argument all about l.jpg
What is the argument all about? non-barbarian.

  • The answer to four specific questions.


Question 1 l.jpg
Question 1 non-barbarian.

  • The problem of knowledge: how is it that I know anything.


Types of knowing l.jpg
Types of knowing non-barbarian.

  • Experiential knowledge

  • Intuitive knowledge


Question 2 l.jpg
Question 2 non-barbarian.

  • What does one know?

  • The problem of reason.



Slide19 l.jpg


Question 3 l.jpg
Question 3 non-barbarian.

  • How should I behave, i.e. origin of individual conduct (morality)?


Question 4 l.jpg
Question 4 non-barbarian.

The problem of governance?


Continental rationalist l.jpg
Continental Rationalist non-barbarian.

  • Descartes - Cogito ergo sum

  • Spinoza – a pan theist

  • Leibnitz - co-developer of The Calculus

  • Kant – The Logic of Pure Reasoning

  • Hobbs – the only Brit in this group


British empericist l.jpg
British Empericist non-barbarian.

  • Loch – association of ideas

  • Berkeley – all is perception

  • Hume - advanced Loch contiguity and reflection

  • Mills

  • Mills, J. S.


Wilhelm wundt l.jpg
Wilhelm Wundt non-barbarian.

  • Developed the first laboratory of Psychology

  • Defined as a Structuralist – what is the structure of human consciousness.


Scope of psychology l.jpg

Scope of Psychology non-barbarian.


Schools of psychology l.jpg
Schools of Psychology non-barbarian.

  • Behaviorism

  • Ethnologist (European)

    Watsonian –Uses classical conditioing

    Skinnerist


The organism as a whole l.jpg
The organism as a whole non-barbarian.

  • Gestalt Perception and Sensation

  • Clinical

  • Humanistic

  • Psychoanalytic

  • Functionalism


Slide28 l.jpg


ad