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Build the navigation model and evaluate (Select the application structure) Design the screens Build the menus, evaluate Select the command buttons Select the metaphors Select representations Create the layout Create the fields, labels and other controls

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slide1

Build the navigation model and evaluate

  • (Select the application structure)
  • Design the screens
    • Build the menus, evaluate
    • Select the command buttons
    • Select the metaphors
    • Select representations
    • Create the layout
    • Create the fields, labels and other controls
    • Add the shortcuts and icons, evaluate
    • Check the colours, visibility, restrictions,
    • conceptual model, mappings, symbol language,
    • exits, and feedback
  • Build the dialog boxes accordingly
  • Build the helps
  • Evaluate

Views

Windows structures

Windows types

Titles

Modes

application structures arlov 1997
Multiwindow interfaces:

consist of many main windows. A main window may launch dialog boxes, usually modal. Each nonmodal window may have its own pull-down menu.

Application structures, (Arlov, 1997)
application structures
Multidocument interfaces (MDI):

one main window that displays one menu. Close or minimising of the main window will close also the child windows of that main windows. If you need to control somehow the dialog, the MDI or if the user uses many application at the same time, or if the child windows have very different menus, a MDI is not the solution. But if your application is built around documents, it is good.

..application structures
application structures1
Multipane interfaces:

has a single main window divided into smaller panes, like Netscape mail. In it, some of the panes boss the others around for instance so that the selection it effects to what is hown in the othes and so on. Good one, if you know exactly which windows must be open at the same time.

..application structures
application structures2
Multiscreen interfaces:

in this alternative, you design the program to take care of all responsibility for changing the display. Old character-based applications was of this type.

..application structures

This is not a real multiscreen window, but

a wizard. The logic of multiscreen interface is however the

same as in typical multiscreen windows: a new window does

not open until the old is put away. Windows are modal.

a tiny window dictionary
A tiny window dictionary
  • Main window: User can minimise it. May have own menus. Typically launches other windows.
  • Child window: Always launched from a main window (or other parent window)
  • Dialog box asks response from a user. In Windows Guide: any form window.
  • Modal window / Modeless (or nonmodal) window: window that insists response by locking other part of a system/ Windows that asks for response, but permits the work go on in other windows
a tiny window dictionary1
… a tiny window dictionary
  • Home window: usually a main window, which starts a task and where a user comes a again in the end of a task
  • Primary window, secondary window: technical names for a main or object window, child or additional window.
  • Object window, Search window, Feedback box, windows for additional information: Semantic or logical names that I like to use.s
windows and titles

Identification of the object

Windowsand titles

Titles:

The name of object

maybe also the

name of instance

(Customer, book)

Primary window

Secondary Window

”Object window”

Dialog box

What happens

(selection of customer)

Whenever possible, name in the title bar

should match the name of the menu option

or bush button

dialog boxes
Dialog boxes
  • Transactional gathering the details heeded to complete a command for instance, which book to open
  • tools like numbering the book, property boxes etc.
  • messages delivering messages and providing feedback
one well working structure

A spider or a star:

An additional

window

A home window

An additional

window

An additional

window

An additional

window

One well-working structure

Design dialogs to yield closure. Sequences of actions should be organised into groups

with a beginning, middle, and end. The informative feedback at the completion of a group

of actions gives operators the satisfaction of accomplishment, a sense of relief, the signal

to drop contingency plans and options from their minds, and an indication that the way is

clear to prepare for the next group of actions.

example an object window with additional windows
Example: An object window with additional windows

A borrower

His loans, orders

and unpaid bills

modal and modeless dialog boxes
Modal and modeless dialog boxes

(Modaalinen, mooditon)

Modeless

Modal

modes

STOP

EJECT

Modes

(Toimintatilat)

Photoshop draw

with brush mode

Insert/replace

modes in word

processor

In phones: call mode

VCR: STOP mode/

Play mode

Use modes only when needed

modes1
…modes
  • Use modes consistently and do not initiate modes unexpectedly. Do not trap the user in a required field.
  • Make it clear how to escape
  • Make the user very clear that he has entered a mode. Offer very visible feedback, colour or changed cursor

Search

Search

Change

Enter

Enter