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January + February - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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January + February. Winter weather. Nature - plants. Food and farming. Nature - animals. Eco friendly actions. Recycle your Christmas tree. Recycle your Christmas cards. Images and information courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch.

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Presentation Transcript
slide1

January + February

Winter weather

Nature - plants

Food and farming

Nature - animals

Eco friendly actions.

Recycle your Christmas tree.

Recycle your Christmas cards.

slide6

starling

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

- Sue Tranter

slide7

blackbird

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

- Sue Tranter

slide8

black-headed gull

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

- Chris Gomersall

slide9

woodpigeon

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

- David Norton

slide10

house sparrow

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

- Steven Round

slide11

carrion crow

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

- Roger Wilmshurst

slide12

blue tit

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

- Nigel Blake

slide13

magpie

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

- Steven Round

slide14

chaffinch

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

- Danny Green

slide15

robin

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

- Ray Kennedy

slide16

Big Schools’ Birdwatch results 2008

Big Schools’ Birdwatch results 2008

Results revealed that the starling was the most commonly seen bird in school grounds in the UK in 2008, with an average of 5.05 seen per school.

The table shows the average number of the top 10 species of birds recorded per school across the UK in 2008 and compares this with the results from the 2007 survey.

slide17

jackdaw

Some other birds that visit our gardens and schools’

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

- Sue Tranter

slide18

common gull

- Niall Benvie

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

slide19

pigeon

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

- Steven Round

slide20

wren

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

- Sue Tranter

slide21

song thrush

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

- Chris Gomersall

slide22

pied wagtail

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

- Sue Tranter

slide23

long tailed tit

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

- Ray Kennedy

slide24

collared dove

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

- Ray Kennedy

slide25

greenfinch

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

- Ray Kennedy

slide26

coal tit

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

- Sue Tranter

slide27

great tit

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

- Nigel Blake

slide28

dunnock

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

- Ray Kennedy

slide29

bullfinch

Other birds that you might see in Wales during the winter months.

Images courtesy photolibrarywales.com

slide30

buzzard

red kite

Images courtesy photolibrarywales.com

slide31

tree sparrow

Images courtesy photolibrarywales.com

slide32

Lets test your bird spotting skills

This will help you take part in the Big Schools’ Birdwatch 2009

slide33

starling

carrion crow

blue tit

black-headed gull

magpie

blackbird

chaffinch

woodpigeon

house sparrow

robin

Do you recognise the ten most seen birds in the Big School Birdwatch 2008

slide34

Can you name these black feathered birds?

blackbird

jackdaw

starling

Can you name these brown feathered birds?

song thrush

house sparrow

wren

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

slide35

Can you name these colourful feathered birds?

robin

chaffinch

greenfinch

Can you name these black and white feathered birds?

pied wagtail

magpie

black headed gull

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

slide36

Can you tell the difference? pigeon or collared dove?

collared dove

pigeon

Can you tell the difference?blue tit, great tit or coal tit?

blue tit

coal tit

great tit

Images courtesy www.rspb.org.uk/schoolswatch

slide37

Pupil activities

  • create digital ‘did you know’ presentations on birds.
  • Visit the RSPB site for information on the Big Schools’ Birdwatch and for activates on making bird feeders and feeding birds in winter.
slide38

Blue tit

A blue tit weighs the same as a pound coin.

We can help this little bird by leaving food out for it during the winter and the early spring months.

A blue tit has enough strength in its feet to support something three times its own weight

Blue tits like to feed their chicks caterpillars and they prefer to live in the woodland where there are more caterpillars.

slide39

The female is not black but brown often with spots and streaks on their breast.

Blackbirds often hops along the ground with their tail up.

They feed on berries, scraps and apples, and search for worms on the lawn.

Blackbirds love to sunbathe, they can often be seen on the ground with their wings spread.

Blackbird – did you know

slide40

We often think of robins as winter birds but they stay in Britain throughout the year.

Males and females look identical, and young birds have no red breast and are spotted with golden brown.

Although generally it’s the male birds who do all the singing, female robins aren’t letting the boys have it all their own way! Robins are one of the few birds where the female sings too.

Robin

slide41

Robins often choose unusual nest sites – kettles, coat pockets and even the skeleton of a dead cat have been known.

Robin

Robins look cute but they are aggressive and will fight other robins away from their patch.

slide42

To create your own digital bird fact file – visit www.rspb.org.uk

  • Use the RSPB website to check:
  • drawings of birds
  • where to see them
  • when to see them
  • what they eat
  • estimated numbers
slide43

Visit the RSBP website for information relating to:

  • details on how to get involved in the Big Schools’ Birdwatch
  • image of birds
  • bird facts, figures and hints.
  • bird calls
slide44

For further information or to obtain a teachers pack on how to make quick and inexpensive bird feeders visit the RSPB website or ring 0300 4568340

slide45

For further information or to obtain a teachers pack on how to feed birds in winter visit the RSPB website or ring 0300 4568340