by chris gibson nick mills and richard nauert 7 th period environmental science ap n.
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By Chris Gibson, Nick Mills, and Richard Nauert 7 th Period Environmental Science AP. 1963, 1965, 1970, 1977, 1990. The Clean Air Act. What The Clean Air Act is. The Clean Air Act sets limits on certain air pollutants which ensures basic health protection from air pollutants for Americans

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The Clean Air Act


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    1. By Chris Gibson, Nick Mills, and Richard Nauert 7th Period Environmental Science AP 1963, 1965, 1970, 1977, 1990 The Clean Air Act

    2. What The Clean Air Act is • The Clean Air Act sets limits on certain air pollutants which ensures basic health protection from air pollutants for Americans • It also gives the EPA the authority to limit emissions of air pollutants from hazardous sources such as steel mills, chemical plants, and utilities.

    3. Authorization • The Clean Air Act of 1963 was the first federal legislation regarding air pollution control. • It established a federal program within the U.S. Public Health Service and authorized research into techniques for monitoring and controlling air pollution. • The Clean Air Act has undergone many amendments: • 1963: Authorized the development of a national program to address air pollution • 1970: Established National Ambient Air Quality Standards, New Source Performance Standards, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, and increased enforcement • 1977: Authorized more provisions to improve standards • 1990: Authorized programs for Acid Deposition Control, Authorized a program to control 189 toxic pollutants, Established permit program requirements, expanded Air Quality Standards, expanded enforcement drastically • The 1990 Amendments increased emphasis on more cost-effective approaches to reduce air pollution and drastically increased the power of the Clean Air Act • EPA must approve state, tribal, and local agency plans for reducing air pollution. • If the state plan doesn’t meet requirements, EPA can issue sanctions against the state and even take over enforcing the Clean Air Act in that area.

    4. Enforcement • The Environmental Protection Agency is responsible for enforcing the Clean Air Act (CAA) in 49 states (California is exempt). • However, in exchange for funding the EPA allows individual states to enforce the CAA. • If a state decides that they would like to assume responsibility for the enforcement of the CAA within their own borders, they must submit a State Implementation Plan to the EPA for approval. • This plan becomes the states’ guide for local enforcement of the CAA. • The Department of Environmental Management within each state is responsible for following and enforcing the State Implementation Plan. • Individual states or tribes may have stronger air pollution laws, but they may not have weaker pollution limits than those set by EPA.

    5. Funding • The EPA funds the enforcement of the Clean Air Act • Federal government provides money to the EPA which then funds the study and the cleanup of air pollution • EPA provides funding for states, local agencies, and tribal nations to enforce the CAA

    6. Reasons For Creation • In 1952, a smog cloud formed in London, England that killed over 3,000 people and became known as London’s “Killer Fog” • In 1948, a smoke cloud formed over Donora, Pennsylvania which killed 20 people and caused 6,000 of the 14,000 residents to become sick • These events and many more caused the government to realize the huge threat to public health and created the Clean Air Act in 1963

    7. Bibliography • http://www.epa.gov • http://www.wikipedia.org