How far have we come? 1902 - women given the right to vote and to sit in parliament (1895- SA). 1949 – First Cabinet Min - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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How far have we come? 1902 - women given the right to vote and to sit in parliament (1895- SA). 1949 – First Cabinet Min

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  1. Women in Business Seminar presented by OneLegal and PsylutionsSeptember 2010“The challenges faced by women in business with a focus on work/life balance and career progression”

  2. How far have we come? • 1902 - women given the right to vote and to sit in parliament (1895- SA). • 1949 – First Cabinet Minister appointed • Until 1966 – women had to resign from public service when married • 1969 – awarded ‘equal pay for equal work’ • 1984 – federal legislation to ban discrimination on basis of sex • 1988: PM launches the first National Agenda for Women • 2010 – Julia Gillard is first female PM-elect

  3. Women today • Women make up 62.7% of bachelor grads (2008) • Female labour force participation of 58%, unemployment 4.6% (above national av. 4.3%) • More than 30% of small business operators are women • 57% of APS are women • In 2008, 30% of Federal Parliament members and senators were women

  4. Board Representation • Half of ASX200 Australian companies have at least 1 woman in executive management team. • 89 women vs 1091 men hold board seats • Hold only 7% of key management personnel positions (mainly HR & public affairs) • Women CEOs & CFOs has declined since 2006 • BUT since 2006 women exec managers in Legal Counsel, Corporate Communications and Company Secretary has increased.

  5. Pay Gaps • Feb 2009, gender pay gap was 17.2%. • Graduates - median salary for female graduates was 95.7% that of male bachelor degree graduates. • As women’s representation at higher levels of the workforce decreases, the gender pay gap increases

  6. Gen Y Women (born 1980 – 1995) • For Gen Y, almost no wage gap exists, Gen X—the wage gap increases to around 3.5 %. • Baby Boomer women, the wage gap jumps to around 13.5 %. • Majority of Australian studies show wage gaps have little to do with differences in education, experience, children, being married, but rather are driven by being female.

  7. Gen X Women (born 1965 – 1979) • A 20-year study (Uni Melb) found only 38% of tertiary-qualified Gen-X women work full time, compared with 90% of Gen-X men at the same level.

  8. What happened? • Access to Flexible Work and Work/Life Balance • Resistance to flexibility increases as seniority increases. • Lack of Quality Part-time Work • Lack of job share opportunities at mid and senior levels • Child Care • 43% per cent of Australian children aged 0-12 years attend child care/after school care.

  9. Our Panel Members • Will Irving - Group General Counsel, Telstra • Sophie Valkan - Chief Executive Officer, RFS Group • Cressida Wall - Head of Policy Development, Office of the Premier of Victoria • Carol Morley - People & Culture Business Partner (Vic, Tas, nabretail), NAB

  10. What next? • Make positions attractive • Improve access to part-time work arrangements. • Introduce flexible work arrangements for senior positions eg technology • Maximise chances of a successful recruitment • Recruitment plans that attract women to senior roles.

  11. What next? • Actively create opportunities for women to demonstrate and develop their skills, experience and confidence • Use secondment arrangements • Facilitate networking opportunities with key internal and external stakeholders. • Mentoring (using male or female mentors) • Mentoring is a supportive relationship that provides an effective means of supporting women to make the transition into executive level positions.