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LGBT Youth Suicide Prevention Project Opening Doors

LGBT Youth Suicide Prevention Project Opening Doors

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LGBT Youth Suicide Prevention Project Opening Doors

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  1. LGBT Youth Suicide Prevention ProjectOpening Doors Open Doors Youth Service Inc. Sally Morris Suicide Prevention Project Worker 3 Julia St, Fortitude Valley, Qld 4006 suicideprevention@opendoors.net.au www.opendoors.net.au (07) 3257 7660 Project funded by Queensland Department of Communities

  2. Workshop Aims • To reflect on progress towards creating a LGBT safe space • To identify barriers to providing support • Creating Accessible services • Identifying needs • Ensuring confidentiality and supporting disclosure • Support strategies for LGBT young people

  3. Project Values • All young people have the right to be themselves & express their unique sexual & gender identity • All young people have the right to be safe and to be kept from harm • All young people have the right to have access to education • All young people have the right to have access to health information and health services • All young people have the right to have access to support and support services • All young people have the right to form healthy friendships and relationships • All LGBT young people have a right to participate fully in the life of Queensland

  4. The Journey So Far…

  5. Assets • What has worked well? • Who has supported us? • What assets haven’t we utilised yet?

  6. Barriers • What hasn’t worked well? • What has gotten in our way? • How have we responded to these?

  7. Accessible Services • Do you feel that your service accessible to LGBT young people? • What is accessibility? • What does an accessible service look like?

  8. Accessible Services • Small Groups • If you were your case study what would you need in a service for you to; • go to it? • disclose your sexuality or gender identity? • How do LGBT young people know a service is safe and confidential?

  9. Accessible Services • Break up into groups of people from the same workplace, or with a similar type workplace • Complete accessible service audit • Is your organisation really accessible to LGBT young people?

  10. Accessible Services • What stops your service from being accessible to and providing support to LGBT young people? • Community barriers? • Organisational barriers? • Values and beliefs? • Attitudes and perceptions? • Skills? • Personal barriers?

  11. Accessible Services • What can be done to overcome these barriers? • What would need to be changed to make your service more accessible? • Make a list of things that can be implemented and a time line for doing this

  12. Morning Tea 15 minutes

  13. What Does Homophobia Look Like? • Personal or internalised homophobia: On a personal level, this is where the fear or hatred of homosexuality exists as a thought inside a person’s head. a prejudice that can be around being perceived as being gay or lesbian. • Interpersonal homophobia: Individual behaviour based on personal homophobia. Hatred or dislike displayed towards others who are, or are perceived to be gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender

  14. What Does Homophobia Look Like? • Institutional homophobia: The many ways in which government, business, churches and other institutions and organisations discriminate against gay and lesbian people. • Cultural homophobia: Social standards or norms that support the overrepresentation of heterosexuality as ‘better’ and more morally correct, pervading all forms of media. Often heterosexuals are not aware these standards even exist, while gay and lesbian people can be painfully aware of them.

  15. What Does Homophobia Look Like? • Read the scenarios and discuss whether this is an example of; • Personal • Interpersonal • Cultural • Institutional homophobia, • A mixture of one or two levels, • Or perhaps them all.

  16. Responding to Homophobia • What are some realistic and appropriate responses to homophobia that we hear, see or experience from young people, colleagues or in the community?

  17. Responding to Homophobia • Address it there and then, especially when said in front of others • Identify and label it as homophobia • Identify and label it as discrimination and that discrimination on the basis of sexuality or gender identity is not ok illegal • Identify the effects of homophobia • Try to relate to them and why they might be acting in that way • Pay attention to the motivation Provide the person with some facts about LGBT people Ask why they believe what they are saying • Identify any generalization as being inaccurate • Ask “What does a persons sexuality have to do with the situation” • Challenge the use of the word “gay” to mean negative. • Use humor

  18. Confidentiality • What does confidentiality mean? • What policies are in place in your work place around confidentiality? • How are these policies governed? Is it the individual’s responsibility or the organisations/ management?

  19. Confidentiality • In these situations what would be the consequences of a breach of confidentiality? • Premature homelessness • Breakdown of family relationships • Loss of support structures – family, friends • Fear of accessing services • Reduced trust in service providers • Increased drug & alcohol use • Increased risk of suicide and self harm • Risk of physical, verbal & emotional violence. • Premature disconnection with school/ education

  20. Identifying Needs • Discuss what might contribute to or be the cause of these situations • A young person presents very distressed and indicates that they have thought about suicide.

  21. Disclosure • Disclosure of sexuality is essential for young people to build an honest sense of self & receive support from a person-centered focus. • Non-disclosure can lead to a range of mental health problems, including social isolation & disconnection to a sense of community belonging. • Fear & anxiety can occur from not disclosing sexuality to at least some people. • Generally young people will disclose to their friends before they disclose to professionals.

  22. Disclosure • Break up into pairs with one person being the Service Provider and the other the Young Person • At the end of the role play identify • 5 POSITIVEaspects of the service providers response • 5 NEGATIVE aspects of the service providers response

  23. Disclosure • The importance of normalising • Allow young people to speak in their own time – do not presume you know their story. • Not making everything about being gay – they are young people & will have young people issues. • Impact on ‘outing’ to friends/ family and support people • ‘Outing euphoria’ – Young people may feel they can come out to everyone because they have received a positive response from you. The importance of working through the ‘coming out’ questions before taking that step. • The impact of having an underlying assumption that being gay will cause the young person to have problems in their future. • Automatically focusing on sexual practices & safe sex.

  24. The Journey of Identity Formation • Identity Confusion - This is the "who am I?" stage, associated with feelings of difference and personal alienation. Begins to be conscious of same-sex feelings or behaviors. “I might not be 100% straight.” “I am different to everyone else” • “Identity Comparison - Rationalising and bargaining stage. Questioning what these feelings mean and possible futures. Great deal of isolation. “If I am gay, what does that mean for me?” “Does this fit with who and what I am supposed to be?” Viv Cass Gay and Lesbian Identity Development Model (1979)

  25. The Journey of Identity Formation • Identity Tolerance May begin to meet other LGBT individuals to counter loneliness, but merely tolerates rather than accepts identity. “I am gay, what are other gay people like? Is this me?” “Where do I fit?” • Identity Acceptance - Continued and increased contact with other LGBT individuals. More positive view of other gays and lesbians. Greater sense of belonging and identity. “I am gay, that’s ok” Life can become a gay bubble or split heterosexual/gay life to balance responsibilities. Viv Cass Gay and Lesbian Identity Development Model (1979)

  26. The Journey of Identity Formation • Identity Pride - Greater feeling of "these are my people." Begins to see incongruity between pride in identity and societal rejection. More involvement and immersion into culture and lifestyle. Often intense anger at heterosexuals - a "them" and "us" attitude. • Identity Synthesis - Begins to see less of a dichotomy between heterosexual and homosexual worlds. Less anger. The gay/lesbian identity becomes an integral part of the individual's complete personality structure. Viv Cass Gay and Lesbian Identity Development Model (1979)

  27. Behaviour Who you have sexual contact with Men? Women? Both? Identity How you identify Gay? Straight? Bisexual? Lesbian? FeelingsWho you are attracted toMen? Women? Both?

  28. Supporting LGBT Young People • Break up in to groups with those with case studies at the same stage of identity formation grouping together • Identity Confusion - This is the "who am I?" stage, “I might not be 100% straight.” • Identity Comparison - Rationalizing and bargaining stage.“If I am gay, what does that mean for me?” • Identity Tolerance - Merely tolerates rather than accepts identity. “I am gay, what are other gay people like? Is this me?” • Identity Acceptance - Greater sense of belonging and identity. “I am gay, that’s ok” • Identity Pride - Greater feeling of "these are my people." Often intense anger at heterosexuals • Identity Synthesis - The gay/lesbian identity becomes an integral part of the individual's complete personality structure.

  29. Supporting LGBT Young People • Talk about what young people at this stage would need from a support service to feel • Safe • Accepted • Valued • Ok to be themselves • Ok to be gay or transgender

  30. Supporting LGBT Young People • Identity Confusion • Create safe and supportive environments that are accepting of difference • Affirm difference and encourage inclusion of all people • Provide positive images of LGBT people and challenge widespread stereotypes • Provide access to accurate information • Being open to and inviting to discussions about same-sex attraction and gender identity • Provide sex education and safe sex information that is inclusive of all sexualities • Challenge homophobic attitudes, beliefs, bullying and exclusion of LGBT people • Normalise being LGBT

  31. Supporting LGBT Young People • Identity Comparison • Create safe and supportive environments that are accepting of difference • Affirm difference and encourage the inclusion of all people • Provide positive images of LGBT people and challenge widespread stereotypes • Provide information on positive gay and lesbian role models, both well-known celebrated personalities and local community members • Provide access in accurate information • Being open to and inviting to discussions about same-sex attraction and gender identity • Provide sex education and safe sex information that is inclusive of all sexualities • Challenge homophobic attitudes, beliefs, bullying and exclusion of LGBT people • Normalise being LGBT

  32. Supporting LGBT Young People • Identity Tolerance • Encourage young people to make links with LGBT social and support groups, including safe online communities, or other LGBT young people • Provide information on positive gay and lesbian role models, both well-known celebrated personalities and local community members • Refer to LGBT mentors or LGBT support people/counselors if needed • Normalise being LGBT • Providing positive images of LGBT people and challenging widespread stereotypes • Provide sex education and safe sex information that is inclusive of all sexualities • Challenge homophobic beliefs that may be internalized beliefs about themselves • Promote diversity and celebrate difference

  33. Supporting LGBT Young People • Identity Acceptance • Provide information on positive gay and lesbian role models, both well-known celebrated personalities and local community members • Link them with LGBT social groups, including safe online communities, or with other LGBT young people • Refer to LGBT mentors or LGBT support people/counselors if needed • Facilitate open discussions about the impact of homophobia, internalized homophobia and heterosexism • Discuss strategies for coming out in a safe way • Provide sex education and safe sex information that is inclusive of all sexualities, with information that is specific to same-sex interactions • Have discussions about healthy and safe relationships

  34. Supporting LGBT Young People • Identity Pride • Discuss strategies for coming out in a safe way and that respect the needs of others • Provide information on positive gay and lesbian role models, • Encourage participation in constructive activities that focus on social change • Introduce them to non-gay but gay friendly people and groups • Encourage acceptance of diversity, including within the LGBT community • Confront attitudes of elitism (us verses them) • Provide sex education and safe sex information that is inclusive of all sexualities, with information that is specific to same-sex interactions • Refer to LGBT mentors or LGBT support people/counselors if needed • Have discussions about healthy and safe relationships, and allow young people to discuss their relationships and experiences • Provide support to young people when relationships end • Support young people to make contact with a GP who gay friendly and knowledgeable of LGBT health issues • Support young people to maintain healthy relationships with their family

  35. Supporting LGBT Young People • Identity Synthesis • Continue to identify and address the impact of homophobia and heterosexism on an individuals wellbeing and their relationships • Encourage and support participation in constructive activities that focus on social change and affirmative action. • Encourage young person to be a positive role model or mentor to younger LGBT young people • Be supportive of and facilitate conversations about relationships, • facilitate discussions about healthy and safe relationships • Provide support to young people when relationships end • Encourage young people to maintain their physical and sexual health through regular check ups with a gay friendly GP.

  36. Afternoon Tea15 minutes

  37. Supporting LGBT Young People • What strategies can be used for all young people regardless if they • Identify as LGBT, • If they are and you don’t know, • If they are unsure of their sexuality or gender, • And also if they aren’t?

  38. Supporting LGBT Young People • Apply the same best practice principles in support work as with all young people. • Do not assume the sexuality of a young person. • Recognise sexuality is a integral part any young person’s identity and needs to be recognized for its significant impact on their lives • Show LGBT people in positive social roles other than common negative stereotypes • Facilitate open, informative discussion about sexuality and gender identity • Discuss homophobia and heterosexism, and its impacts on all people • In talking with young people use language that demonstrates that you are open to young people questioning their sexuality or gender identity, or who are LGBT. • Display visual materials that reflect your agencies commitment to supporting LGBT young people. Such as rainbow stickers, anti-homophobia posters, LGBT service posters.

  39. Supporting LGBT Young People • Keep a list of LGBT specific support services, and doctors, services and counselors etc who are LGBT friendly on your referral database • Challenge homophobic comments, jokes or suggestions from either colleagues or young people • Change the language for your interactions and organization policy, procedures and client related forms so that they use inclusive language and don’t assume heterosexuality. • Stock sexuality and gender identity resources • When suicide, alcohol or drug abuse, or sexual risk behaviours are addressed in services provided or policy, the potential connection to sexual orientation is included. • Do not assume a young person’s behaviour based on their identified sexuality • Remember that the majority of LGBT people are invisible to the majority of the community.

  40. Where to From Here?

  41. Keeping Connected and InformedOpen Doors Service Providers Network • A statewide network for organisations and workers who facilitate groups, coordinate projects, work with or provide accessible services to LGBT young people across Queensland. • Open Doors Service Providers Network database which is made public and whose information is made available to service providers. Located online at www.opendoors-youthservice.org • Organisations must register and be accepted to the network for their details to be listed.

  42. Keeping Connected and InformedOpen Doors Service Providers Forum • Located on the Open Doors services provider website. • For service providers who are working with LGBT young people to: • remain connected • share stories • ask questions and seek advice • share resources • The forum will have conversation threads for each location.

  43. Keeping Connected and InformedWebsite - www.opendoors-youthservice.org • Service Providers Forum • research papers • downloadable resources • links to useful organisations

  44. Resources • Resource packs • The Only Way Out is In (Open Doors) • Exploring Fantasies (Open Doors) • Longreach for Outreach (PFLAG) • Gay and Lesbian Welfare Association • posters • rainbow sticker • More downloadable resources can be found at www.opendoors-youthservice.org

  45. Thank you!Please keep in contact!