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PUKO’A UH SYSTEM. NATIVE HAWAIIAN ADVISORY COUNCIL. SIX YEAR PLANS 2002-2008 FOR HAWAIIANS. ACHIEVING ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE. BY MANU KA’IAMA. DIRECTOR NATIVE HAWAIIAN LEADERSHIP PROJECT. AND BY LILIKALA KAME‘ELEIHIWA. DIRECTOR ON SABBATICAL

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puko a uh system

PUKO’A UH SYSTEM

NATIVE HAWAIIAN ADVISORY COUNCIL

six year plans 2002 2008 for hawaiians

SIX YEAR PLANS 2002-2008 FOR HAWAIIANS

ACHIEVING ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

by manu ka iama

BY MANU KA’IAMA

DIRECTOR

NATIVE HAWAIIAN LEADERSHIP PROJECT

and by lilikala kame eleihiwa

AND BY LILIKALA KAME‘ELEIHIWA

DIRECTOR ON SABBATICAL

KAMAKAKUOKALANI CENTER FOR HAWAIIAN STUDIES, UHM

he pule pale a prayer of protection
HE PULE PALE[A prayer of protection]
  • NOHO ANA KE AKUA

[The gods dwell]

  • I KA NAHELEHELE

[In the forest]

  • I ‘ALAI ‘IA I KE KI’OHU’OHU

[Hidden by the mist]

  • I KA UA KOKO

[In the low lying rainbow]

e na kino malu i ka lani oh ancestors sheltered by the heavens
E NA KINO MALU I KA LANI [Oh ancestors sheltered by the heavens]
  • MALU E HOE

[Clear our path]

  • E HO’OULU MAI ANA ‘O LAKA

[The goddess Laka inspires]

  • I KONA MAU KAHU

[We who are her guardians]

  • ‘O MAKOU, ‘O MAKOU WALE NO E [We are the ones, we are the only ones]
puko a native hawaiian

PUKO’A NATIVE HAWAIIAN

UH SYSTEM ADVISORY COUNCIL

puko a
PUKO’A

DEDICATED TO INCREASING THE NUMBER OF NATIVE HAWAIIAN STUDENTS, FACULTY, STAFF AND ADMINISTRATORS IN THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM TO 23 PER CENT, WHICH MIRRORS THE PERCERNTAGE OF HAWAIIANS IN HAWAI’I’S GENERAL POPULATION.

hawaiian population
HAWAIIAN POPULATION

TOTAL IN THE WORLD = 401,162

TOTAL IN HAWAI’I = 239,655

O’AHU COUNTY = 153,117

HAWAI’I COUNTY = 43,010

MAUI COUNTY = 30,017

KAUA’I COUNTY = 13,511

challenges for hawaiian students
CHALLENGES FOR HAWAIIAN STUDENTS
  • Of 75,000 Hawaiians in DOE schools, only 5% will go to college
  • 50% of UHM freshman drop out within the 1st 2 years
  • Hawaiians are 23% of the population, but 45% of the prisons
puko a vision
PUKO’A VISION
  • We, the Känaka Maoli within the University of Hawai’i system, are the Native people of this land, unique by virtue of our ancestral ties to the ‘äina, our history, language, culture, knowledge and spirituality.
puko a vision14
PUKO’A VISION
  • Püko’a envisions a University of Hawai’i committed to the empowerment, advancement and self-determination of Känaka Maoli, through distinctly Hawaiian instruction, research and service.
puko a vision15
PUKO’A VISION
  • Therefore, Püko’a promotes the superior development of all aspects of Känaka Maoli identity, including a pono spiritual, intellectual, cultural, economic and social well-being.
  • Kamakaküokalani, March 28, 2002
puko a mission
PUKO’A MISSION
  • Increase the number of Native Hawaiian students, faculty, staff and administration in the university system to 23%, which mirrors the percentage of Hawaiians in Hawai’i’s general population.
puko a mission17
PUKO’A MISSION

2. Promote a high standard of excellence in the study of Hawaiian language and culture..

3. Advocate for parity for Native Hawaiians and Native Hawaiian serving programs.

4. Insure integrity in the use of funds designated for Native Hawaiians.

puko a mission18
PUKO’A MISSION

5. Assist the university in leveraging appropriate funding for Native Hawaiian programs.

6. Increase collaboration and partnerships between the University of Hawai'i campuses.

naming of the p ko a council
NAMING OF THE PÜKO’A COUNCIL

“He Puko’a e kani ai ka ‘Aina” -

“A grain of coral eventually grows into land.”

naming of the p ko a council20
NAMING OF THE PÜKO’A COUNCIL

A more figurative interpretation is “A Coral head calling out to the Land;” coral being the first child of the male and female primordial essence and the beginning of life in the Hawaiian cosmogony.

naming of the p ko a council21
NAMING OF THE PÜKO’A COUNCIL

The UH- System Wide Native Hawaiian Council was named Püko’a for the above ÿÖlelo Noÿeau, or ancestral proverb, to describe our work at the University of Hawai’i.

naming of the p ko a council22
NAMING OF THE PÜKO’A COUNCIL

Another shorter version of that proverb is, “Püko’a Kani ÿÄina: A Hard Rock of the Land.” Said of a strong fighter who overcomes opposition but is himself impossible to overcome.

puko a organizational structure
PUKO’A ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

Püko'a's membership is open to the faculty and staff of the University of Hawai'i system's Native Hawaiian serving programs, and to Native Hawaiians who teach or on staff in other university programs and departments. The membership meets twice each year.

puko a organizational structure24
PUKO’A ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

Püko'a has no elected officers and reaches decisions on policies and recommendations through its executive council, which meets every other month.

puko a organizational structure25
PUKO’A ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

The membership of each campus elects two representatives to the Püko'a Executive Council, providing equal representation for each campus, whether it is a community college or four-year university.

puko a organizational structure26
PUKO’A ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

All members can attend executive council meetings, but only the elected representatives or their proxies can vote. The executive council approves motions and policies in the traditional Hawaiian way, by consensus.

puko a executive uh manoa
PUKO’A EXECUTIVE: UH MANOA
  • Lilikalä Kame'eleihiwa, Director, Kamakaküokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies,
  • Kapä Oliveira, Instructor, Department of Hawaiian and Indo-Pacific Languages
puko a executive uh hilo
PUKO’A EXECUTIVE: UH HILO
  • Kalena Silva, Director, Ka Haka 'Ula o Ke'elikölani College of Hawaiian Language
  • Kalani Makekau-Whittaker, Coordinator, Kïpuka - Title III Native Hawaiian Student Support Program
puko a executive
PUKO’A EXECUTIVE
  • HAWAI'I COMMUNITY COLLEGE
  • Pua Kanahele, Assistant Professor, Hawaiian Studies
  • Kaipo Frias, Instructor, Title III Ola 'O Haloa
  • HONOLULU COMMUNITY COLLEGE:
  • Jan Petersen, Dean, Liberal Arts
  • Kahunawai Wright, Coordinator, Native Hawaiian Vocational Education Project
puko a executive kapi olani community college
PUKO’A EXECUTIVE KAPI'OLANI COMMUNITY COLLEGE
  • Kealalokahi Losch,Assistant Professor, Hawaiian and Pacific Island Studies
  • Colette Higgins, Instructor, Hawaiian and Pacific Island Studies
puko a executive kaua i community college
PUKO’A EXECUTIVE KAUA'I COMMUNITY COLLEGE
  • Ilei Beniamina, Assistant Professor, Student Services
  • Dennis Chun, Instructor, Hawaiian Studies
puko a executive33
PUKO’A EXECUTIVE
  • LEEWARD COMMUNITY COLLEGE
  • 'Ekela Kaniaupio-Crozier, Instructor, Hawaiian Language
  • Momi Kamahele, Instructor, Hawaiian Studies
  • MÄUI COMMUNITY COLLEGE
  • Lui Hokoana, Director, Ku'ina Program
  • Kï'ope Raymond, Assistant Professor, Hawaiian Studies
puko a executive windward community college
PUKO’A EXECUTIVE WINDWARD COMMUNITY COLLEGE
  • Liko Hoe, Instructor, Hawaiian Language and Culture
  • Kalani Meinecke, Assistant Professor, Hawaiian Language and Culture
puko a uh statewide council uh manoa
PUKO'A UH STATEWIDE COUNCIL: UH MANOA
  • College of Education: Kerri-Ann Hewitt, Pi'ilani Ka'aloa, Moku Ka'aloa, Margie Maaka
  • Co-Curricular Activities, Programs & Services: Lia O'Neill Keawe
  • Ethnic Studies: Davianna McGregor
  • Hawaiian Art: Maile Andrade
  • Hawaiian Engineering: Kaeo Duarte, Joshua Kaÿakua
puko a uh statewide council uh manoa36
PUKO'A UH STATEWIDE COUNCIL: UH MANOA
  • Hawaiian Language Program and Mary Kawena Pukui Hale Center for Survival and Promotion of the Hawaiian Language: Kekeha Solis, No'eau Warner, Naomi Losch, Kapä Oliveira, Keawe Lopes, Keao Nesmith, Kaliko Baker, Haili Baker, Leilani Basham, U'ilani Bobbitt, Keoki Faria, 'Ioli'i Hawkins, Keli'i Ki'ilehua, Lalepa Koga, Kawehi Lucas, Puakea Nogelmeier, Ipo Wong, Laiana Wong
p ko a uh statewide council uh manoa
PÜKO'A UH STATEWIDE COUNCIL: UH MANOA
  • Hawaiian Music: Vicky Holt-Takamine, Iokepa DeSantos, Nola Nahulu, Noelani Zuttermeister, Peter Medeiros
  • Haumana Biomedical Research Program: Healani Chang
  • 'Ike Ao Pono: Nalani Minton
  • 'Imi Hö'ala Health Careers Opportunity Program: Nanette Judd
  • Intercollegiate Athletics: Marilyn Moniz-Kaho'ohanohano
p ko a uh statewide council uh manoa38
PÜKO'A UH STATEWIDE COUNCIL: UH MANOA
  • Kamakaküokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies: Lilikalä Kame'eleihiwa,Jonathan Osorio,Kanalu Young, Carlos Andrade, April Drexel, Mehanaokala Hind, Ku'uipo Cummings, Levon Ohai, Pömaika'i Kaniaupio-Crozier, Marvlee Naukana-Gilding, Tino Ramirez
  • Küle'a: Ioane Ho'omanawanui
  • Küali'i Council: Nainoa Thompson
  • Kuali’i Student Services: Kalawai'a Moore
p ko a uh statewide council uh manoa39
PÜKO'A UH STATEWIDE COUNCIL: UH MANOA

Küle'a: Ioane Ho'omanawanui

  • Native Hawaiian Center of Excellence: Ben Young, Martina Kamaka
  • Native Hawaiian Leadership Project: Manu Ka'iama
  • Nä Pua No'eau Program for Gifted and Talented Hawaiian Youth: Kinohi Gomes
  • Political Science: Noenoe Silva, Mamo Kim
  • Puko’a/Kuali’i Coordinator: Kahi Brooks
p ko a uh statewide council uh hilo
PÜKO'A UH STATEWIDE COUNCIL: UH HILO

Ka Haka 'Ula o Ke'elikölani College of Hawaiian Language: Kalena Silva, Keiki Kawai'ae'a, Larry Kimura, Kauanoe Wilson, Pila Wilson, Niniau Kawaihae, Chad Babayan, Haunani Bernardino, Hiapo Perreira, Keola Donaghy, Keoni Kelekolio, Ku'ulei Kepa'a, Kana'e Keawe

  • Hawaiian Leadership Development Program: Gail Makuakane-Lundin
p ko a uh statewide council uh hilo41
PÜKO'A UH STATEWIDE COUNCIL: UH HILO
  • Minority Access and Achievement Program: Ginger Hamilton
  • Kïpuka - Title III Native Hawaiian Student Support Program: Kalani Makekau- Whittaker
  • Nä Pua No'eau Program for Gifted and Talented Hawaiian Youth: David Sing, Roberta Banks, Toni Mallow, Kalani Flores, Pearla Ha'alilo, U'ilani Lima, Ola Ropa
p ko a uh statewide council community colleges
PÜKO'A UH STATEWIDE COUNCIL: Community Colleges

COMMUNITY COLLEGES CHANCELLOR'S OFFICE: Kamuela Chun

HAWAI'I COMMUNITY COLLEGE: Pua Kanahele, Kaipo Frias, Kekuhi Kanahele, Rosemary Burnett, Terry Plunkett

  • HONOLULU COMMUNITY COLLEGE: Jan Petersen, Kahunawai Wright, Malia Gibson
p ko a uh statewide council community colleges43
PÜKO'A UH STATEWIDE COUNCIL: Community Colleges
  • KAPI'OLANI COMMUNITY COLLEGE: Kauka de Silva, Kealalokahi Losch, Kahi Wight, Michael Ane, 'Iwalani Tasaka, Käwika Napoleon, Colette Higgins, Kristie Souza-Malterre, Susan Nartatez, Ka'ili Chun, Chuck Souza, Dennis Kawaharada, Lisa Käna'e, Pöhaku Stone, Käwika McGuire
p ko a uh statewide council community colleges44
PÜKO'A UH STATEWIDE COUNCIL: Community Colleges
  • KAUA'I COMMUNITY COLLEGE: 'Ilei Beniamina, Dennis Chun, Ka'imi Summers, Summer Helms, Kamuela Aea, Kalani Simeona, Jill Kouchi, Malia Chock, Lyra Ransone
  • LEEWARD COMMUNITY COLLEGE: 'Ekela Kaniaupio-Crozier, Momi Kamahele, Lucy Gay, Randall Francisco, Tamara Watson-Wade, Pat Kamalani Hurley, Bill Souza, Milton Anderson, Kanani Baker, Patsy Lee Dudoit, Tommy Lynn Benavente, Walterbea Aldeguer, William Akama III
p ko a uh statewide council community colleges45
PÜKO'A UH STATEWIDE COUNCIL: Community Colleges
  • MÄUI COMMUNITY COLLEGE: Kï'ope Raymond, Lui Hokoana, Mikahala Helm, Kahele Dukelow, Ohua Morando, Kapulani Antonio, Virginia Pokini, Lokahi Antonio, Kimberly Helm, Hokulani Holt-Padilla
  • WINDWARD COMMUNITY COLLEGE: Kalani Meinecke, Liko Hoe, Winston Kong, Kapulani Landgraf, Mark Hamasaki
puko a history
PUKO’A HISTORY
  • During 2001, through the leadership of Dr. Kame’eleihiwa, the Manoa campus began ot hold meetings inviting all Hawaiians and Hawaiian serving programs to sit at the table and discuss how UH Manoa could better address Native Hawaiian issues.
  • The Kuali’i UHM Native Hawaiian Advisory Council was formed.
kuali i was a high chief of o ahu in 1700 ad
KUALI’I WAS A HIGH CHIEF OF O’AHU IN 1700 AD
  • Equally adept at administration, war & caring for the people
  • Unified O’ahu, Moloka’i, Kaua’i & Ni’ihau into the Northern kingdom
  • Built many fishponds & lo’I kalo to feed people
puko a history48
PUKO’A HISTORY
  • In May 2001, Dr. Kame’eleihiwa decided to prepare a budget request for the Kuali’I Council to present to the new President, Evan Dobelle. She submitted the Kamakakuokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies standard request for $1.5 M, and invited other Manoa Programs to do the same.
  • Unfortunately, for various reasons, no other program was ready to submit their requests in time for an initial meeting with President Dobelle on July 1, 2001.
puko a history49
PUKO’A HISTORY
  • Two weeks later, many of us attended a meeting with President Dobelle where he informed us that he had $1.5 M that he could give for Hawaiian Initiatives, $500,000 up front and the remainder in the following year.
  • He was specifically asked “who” this money was for, and he replied since Manoa asked, Manoa would receive it. He also added,” but sharing is good.”
puko a history50
PUKO’A HISTORY
  • Subsequently, in September 2001, UH Hilo Ka Haka ‘Ula o Ke’elikolani College of Hawaiian Language was promised another $500,000.
  • Please see the attached spreadsheet for allocation of Dobelle Initiative funds for UHM
dobelle initiative

DOBELLE INITIATIVE

FUNDS: FY 2001-2002, FY 2002-2003

puko a history53
PUKO’A HISTORY
  • In January 2002, the UHM Kuali’i Council invited Native Hawaiian representatives from every campus in the UH system to come to a retreat in Malaekahana, O’ahu to discuss Native Hawaiian disparities, under representation and the long forgotten 1986 Ka’u Report.
  • 60 Hawaiian professors, counselors, administrators, students and non-Hawaiian supporters met for 3 days and formed the Puko’a Council.
puko a history54
PUKO’A HISTORY
  • In the spirit of the UH System Strategic Plan’s Ahupua’a concept, only Puko’a has made a successful effort in representing from the mountain to sea, an extensive and exhaustive plan, that touches numerous programs, highlights and addresses basic needs on all campuses, and unifies these campuses into one ahupua’a. Also at this retreat, a five year plan and budget was prepared for UH system.
puko a budget

PUKO’A BUDGET

REQUESTS:

FY 2002-2010

possible funding sources
POSSIBLE FUNDING SOURCES

University of Hawai’i:

RTRF for New Research

Federal Grants:

Title 3 and 9

HUD

NSF

possible funding sources61
POSSIBLE FUNDING SOURCES

University of Hawai’i:

System Yearly Income = $800M

UH use of Ceded Lands = 20%

20% of $800M = $160M

2% of $800M = $16 M

possible funding sources62
POSSIBLE FUNDING SOURCES

Private Foundations:

Ford

Hewlett

Kellogg

Mellon

Lannon

possible funding sources63
POSSIBLE FUNDING SOURCES

Hawaiian Monies:

Kamehameha

OHA

In partnership with UH

example oha grant of 1 5m to kamakakuokalani center for hawaiian studies over 5 years 300 00 year
Example: OHA Grant of $1.5M to KAMAKAKUOKALANI Center for Hawaiian Studies over 5 years [$300,00 /year]
the p ko a council also recommends that the

THE PÜKO'A COUNCIL ALSO RECOMMENDS THAT THE

UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI’I BOARD OF REGENTS ADOPT THE FOLLOWING POLICIES:

policy 1 statement of policy on the status of native hawaiians at the university of hawai i
POLICY 1: STATEMENT OF POLICY ON THE STATUS OF NATIVE HAWAIIANS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI'I
  • I. INTRODUCTION
  • The University of Hawai'i recognizes the unique political status Native
  • Hawaiians have with the United States and Hawai'i State governments, respectively. Furthermore, the University of Hawai'i recognizes the important role it plays as a State institution of higher education in addressing societal and educational challenges facing Native Hawaiians as a political entity.
policy 1 continued
POLICY 1 CONTINUED
  • This policy establishes the administrative framework to ensure compliance with applicable federal and state statutes, rules, regulations, city and county ordinance, and provisions in the collective bargaining agreements relative to Native Hawaiians at the University of Hawai'i.
policy 1 continued68
POLICY 1 CONTINUED
  • II. POLICY
  • It is the policy of the University of Hawai'i:
  • A. To provide positive system-wide executive support in the development, implementation and improvement of programs and services for Native Hawaiians.
  • B. To increase representation of Native Hawaiians in all facets of the University of Hawai'i relative to the University's efforts on affirmative action and equal employment opportunities in its educational mission and as an employer.
policy 1 continued69
POLICY 1 CONTINUED
  • C. To support full participation of Native Hawaiians in all initiatives and programs of the University. Such initiatives and programs may or may not be conducted exclusively for Hawaiians.
  • D. To solicit actively consultation from Püko'a, the system wide council formed by Native Hawaiian faculty, staff and students.
policy 1 continued70
POLICY 1 CONTINUED
  • The policy is consistent with the University of Hawai'i's strategic plan in the following ways:
  • Providing Access to Quality Educational Experiences and Service to the State
  • Responsiveness to State Needs
  • Respect and Diversity
  • Hawaiian, Asian, Pacific and International Role
  • Special Identity
policy 1 continued71
POLICY 1 CONTINUED

An increase of Native Hawaiian participation will benefit the University of Hawai'i by developing a resource that has not been fully utilized. This untapped resource will provide the University and the State with individuals who will contribute to the development and leadership of the State and the Nation. While many Native Hawaiian students are not assessed by their secondary schools to have high potential, they do exceptionally well when appropriate program and curriculum changes and support are provided. This policy will assist in raising the educational status of Native Hawaiians who are under-represented throughout the University of Hawai'i. March 28, 2002

slide72
POLICY 2: STATEMENT OF POLICY ON THE STATUS OF THE STUDY OF NATIVE HAWAIIAN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI'I
  • I. INTRODUCTION
  • The University of Hawai'i, as a system of campuses, recognizes that the State of Hawai'i has two official languages, Hawaiian and English. Furthermore, the University of Hawai'i recognizes that the Constitution of the State of Hawai'i requires unique promotion of the study of Hawaiian language, culture, and history for
policy 2 continued
POLICY 2 CONTINUED
  • everyone in the state, and has a moral obligation to protect the rights of Native Hawaiians to practice their traditional and customary rights which include their language, culture, and other aspects of their identity on lands occupied by the University of Hawai'i and elsewhere. (Hawai'i State Constitution: Article XV, section four; Article X, section four; Article XII, section seven).
policy 2 continued74
POLICY 2 CONTINUED
  • II. POLICY
  • It is the policy of the University of Hawai'i:
  • A. To provide for and promote the use of both of Hawaiian and English as languages of operation within the University of Hawai'i system for the people of Hawai'i.
policy 2 continued75
POLICY 2 CONTINUED
  • B. To provide for the study of Hawaiian language, culture and history within the University of Hawai'i system with a level of support beyond that which it provides for the study of non-Hawaiian language, culture and history.
policy 2 continued76
POLICY 2 CONTINUED
  • C. To encourage Native Hawaiians to practice their language, culture and other aspects of their traditional and customary rights throughout all University of Hawai'i campuses and provide specific Hawaiian environments and facilities for such activities.
policy 2 continued77
POLICY 2 CONTINUED
  • D. To address the needs of Native Hawaiians, the state of Hawai'i, and the world at large, in the area of Hawaiian language, culture and history through outreach.
  • March 28, 2002
e ola mau ka lahui hawai i a mau loa aku
E OLA MAU KA LAHUI HAWAI’I A MAU LOA AKU

Let the Hawaiian People live forever

Let the Native People of the Earth live forever