notes on baruch de spinoza theological political treatise 1670 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
NOTES ON BARUCH DE SPINOZA, Theological-Political Treatise (1670) PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
NOTES ON BARUCH DE SPINOZA, Theological-Political Treatise (1670)

Loading in 2 Seconds...

  share
play fullscreen
1 / 8
Download Presentation

NOTES ON BARUCH DE SPINOZA, Theological-Political Treatise (1670) - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

frances-woods
128 Views
Download Presentation

NOTES ON BARUCH DE SPINOZA, Theological-Political Treatise (1670)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. NOTES ON BARUCH DE SPINOZA, Theological-Political Treatise (1670) Probable Spinoza drawing of himself in the likeness of Masaniello [Tommaso Aniello (1622 – 1647)], a fisherman who led a Revolt in Naples]

  2. The Preface to the Theological-Political Treatise (TTP) • Spinoza begins by examining the sources of superstition. He identifies two fundamental ones: fear and hope of uncertain goods. • Misfortunes help generate comforting fictions whose principle is a belief in Providence.

  3. A Historical Example: Alexander the Great Spinoza uses the example of Alexander the Great in order to prove that superstitious beliefs are only fantasies in the imagination that arise from fear of uncertain events. Such beliefs have resulted in numerous social conflicts and wars.

  4. Monarchs and Superstition Monarchs have especially used superstitious religion in order to dominate their people and so have generally forbidden the free expression of thought.

  5. Democracy against Superstition • But such an attitude is contrary to the democratic spirit. • The peace of a democratic state can only be based on the freedom of thought; indeed, this is the main thesis of the TTP.

  6. Religion and Superstition In the Preface, and throughout the TTP, Spinoza strongly criticizes the intolerance of religious leaders who destroy true spiritual religion; he offers several examples of such intolerance.

  7. Correct Philosophical Method • In the different chapters of the TTP Spinoza offers a philosophical method for how to interpret Scripture. • He separates philosophy and faith, and states the rules of a universal religion, which is revealed to everyone’s “natural light of reason,” and is based on justice and charity.

  8. Philosophy and the “Vulgar” Spinoza closes the preface by noting that he is writing not for the “vulgar” (vulgus), who live under the influence of the passions, but instead for those who are philosophically inclined and sincerely want to examine the relationship between religion and the state.