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Early Time Dynamics in Heavy Ion Collisions from AdS/CFT Correspondence. Yuri Kovchegov The Ohio State University based on work done with Anastasios Taliotis, arXiv:0705.1234 [hep-ph]. Instead of Outline.

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early time dynamics in heavy ion collisions from ads cft correspondence

Early Time Dynamics in Heavy Ion Collisions from AdS/CFT Correspondence

Yuri Kovchegov

The Ohio State University

based on work done with Anastasios Taliotis, arXiv:0705.1234 [hep-ph]

instead of outline
Instead of Outline
  • Janik and Peschanski [hep-th/0512162] used AdS/CFT correspondence to show that at asymptotically late proper times the strongly-coupled medium produced in the collisions flows according to Bjorken hydrodynamics.
  • In our work we have
    • Re-derived JP late-time results without requiring the curvature invariant to be finite.
    • Analyzed early-time dynamics and showed that energy density goes to a constant at early times.
    • Have therefore shown that isotropization (and hopefully thermalization) takes place in strong coupling dynamics.
    • Derived a simple formula for isotropization time and used it for heavy ion collisions at RHIC to obtain 0.3 fm/c, in agreement with hydrodynamic simulations.
notations
Notations

We’ll be using the

following notations:

proper time

and rapidity

most general boost invariant energy momentum tensor
Most General Boost Invariant Energy-Momentum Tensor

The most general boost-invariant energy-momentum tensor

for a high energy collision of two very large nuclei is (at x3 =0)

which, due to

gives

There are 3 extreme limits.

limit i free streaming
Limit I: “Free Streaming”

Free streaming is characterized by the following “2d”

energy-momentum tensor:

such that

and

  • The total energy E~ e t is conserved, as expected for
  • non-interacting particles.
limit ii bjorken hydrodynamics
Limit II: Bjorken Hydrodynamics

In the case of ideal hydrodynamics, the energy-momentum

tensor is symmetric in all three spatial directions (isotropization):

such that

Using the ideal gas equation of state, , yields

Bjorken, ‘83

  • The total energy E~ e t is not conserved, while the total entropy S is conserved.
most general boost invariant energy momentum tensor1

If then, as , one gets .

Most General Boost Invariant Energy-Momentum Tensor

Deviations from the scaling of energy density,

like are due to longitudinal pressure

, which does work in the longitudinal direction

modifying the energy density scaling with tau.

  • Non-zero positive longitudinal

pressure and isotropization

↔ deviations from

limit iii color glass at early times
Limit III: Color Glass at Early Times

In CGC at very early times

(Lappi, ’06)

we get, at the leading log level,

such that, since

Energy-momentum tensor is

ads cft approach
AdS/CFT Approach

Start with the metric in Fefferman-Graham coordinates in AdS5

space

and solve Einstein equations

Expand the 4d metric near the boundary of the AdS space

If our world is Minkowski, , then

and

iterative solution
Iterative Solution

General solution of Einstein equations is not known and is hard

to obtain. One first assumes a specific form for energy density

and the solves Einstein equations perturbatively order-by-order

in z:

The solution in AdS space (if found) determines which

function of proper time is allowed for energy density.

At the order z4 it gives the following familiar conditions:

and

solution
Solution

5d (super) gravity

lives here in the AdS space

Our 4d

world

Not every boundary condition in 4d

(at z=0) leads to a valid gravity

solution in the 5d bulk – get constraints

on the 4d world from 5d gravity

z=0

z

iterative solution1
Iterative Solution

We begin by expanding the coefficients of the metric

into power series in z:

iterative solution power law scaling
Iterative Solution: Power-Law Scaling

Assuming power-law scaling

we iteratively obtain coefficients in the expansion

To illustrate their structure let me display one of them:

dominates at

early times

dominates at

late times

(only if !)

allowed powers of proper time
Allowed Powers of Proper Time

Janik and Peschanski (‘05) showed that requiring the energy

density to be non-negative in all frames leads to

Assuming power-law scaling the above

conditions lead to

The above conclusion about which term dominates at what time is safe!

late time solution scaling
Late Time Solution: Scaling

At late times the perturbative (in z) series becomes

Janik and Peschanski (‘05) were the first to observe it and

looked for the full solution of Einstein equations at late proper

time as a function of the scaling variable

The metric coefficients become:

Here a0 <0 is the normalization

of the energy density

janik and peschanski s late time solution
Janik and Peschanski’s Late Time Solution

The late time solution reads (in terms of scaling variable v,

for v fixed and t going to infinity):

with

But what fixes D ???

At this point Janik and Peschanski fixed the power D by

requiring that the curvature invariant has no singularities:

late time solution branch cuts
Late Time Solution: Branch Cuts

Instead we notice that the above solution has a branch cut for

This is not your run of the mill singularity: this is a branch cut!

This means that the metric becomes complex and multivalued

for ! Since the metric has to be real and

single-valued we conclude that the metric (and the curvature

invariant) do not exist for . That is unless

the coefficients in front of the logarithms are integers!

late time solution branch cuts1
Late Time Solution: Branch Cuts

Remember that functions a(v), b(v) and c(v) need to be

exponentiated to obtain the metric coefficients:

If the coefficients in front of the logarithms are integers,

functions A, B and C would be single-valued and real.

late time solution fixing the power
Late Time Solution: Fixing the Power

Requiring the coefficients in front of the logarithms to be

integers l,m,n

after simple algebra (!) one obtains that the only allowed

power is , giving the Bjorken hydrodynamic scaling

of the energy density, reproducing the result of Janik and

Peschanski

early time solution scaling
Early Time Solution: Scaling

Let us apply the same strategy to the early-time solution: using

perturbative (in z) solution at early times give the following

series

While no single scaling variable exists, it appears that the

series expansion is in

such that

early time solution ansatz
Early Time Solution: Ansatz

Keeping u fixed and taking t ->0, we write the following ansatze

for the metric coefficients:

with a, b and g some unknown functions of u.

early time general solution
Early-Time General Solution

Solving Einstein equations yields

where F is the hypergeometric function.

Hypergeometric functions have a branch cut for u>1.

We have branch cuts again!

allowed powers of proper time1
Allowed Powers of Proper Time

However, now hypergeometric functions are not in the exponent.

The only way to avoid branch cuts is to have hypergeometric

series terminate at some finite order, becoming a polynomial.

Before we do that we note that, at early times the total energy

of the produced medium is .

Requiring it to be finite we conclude that for

the power should be .

Hence, at early times the physically allowed powers are:

early time solution terminating the series
Early Time Solution: Terminating the Series

Finally, we see that the hypergeometric series in the solution

terminates only for in the physically allowed

range of .

early time solution
Early Time Solution

The early-time scaling of the energy density in this

strongly-coupled medium is

with

This leads to the following energy-momentum tensor,

reminiscent of CGC at very early times:

early time solution log ansatz
Early Time Solution: Log Ansatz

One can also look for the solution with the logarithmic ansatz

(sort of like fine-tuning):

The result of solving Einstein equations (no branch cuts this

time) is that and the energy density scales

as

The approach to a constant at early times could be

logarithmic! (More work is needed to sort this out.)

isotropization transition the big picture
Isotropization Transition: the Big Picture

We summary of our knowledge of energy density scaling with

proper time for the strongly-coupled medium at hand:

(this work)

Janik,

Peschanski

‘05

isotropization transition
Isotropization Transition

We have thus see that the strongly-coupled system starts out

very anisotropic (with negative longitudinal pressure) and

evolves towards complete (Bjorken) isotropization!

Let us try to estimate when isotropization transition takes place:

the iterative solution has both late- and early-time terms.

dominates at

early times

dominates at

late times

has a branch cut at

has a branch cut at

isotropization transition time estimate
Isotropization Transition: Time Estimate

We plot both branch cuts in the (z, t) plane:

The intercept is at the

“isotropization time”

isotropization transition time estimate1
Isotropization Transition: Time Estimate

In terms of more physical quantities we re-write the above

estimate as

where e0 is the coefficient in Bjorken energy-scaling:

For central Au+Au collisions at RHIC at

hydrodynamics requires e=15 GeV/fm3 at t=0.6 fm/c

(Heinz, Kolb ‘03), giving e0=38 fm-8/3. This leads to

in good agreement with hydrodynamics!

isotropization transition estimate self critique
Isotropization Transition Estimate: Self-Critique

An AdS/CFT skeptic would argue that our estimate

is easy to obtain from dimensional reasoning. If one has a

conformally invariant theory with , the only

scale in the theory is given by . Making a scale with

dimension of time out of it gives .

We would counter by saying that AdS/CFT gives a prefactor.

The skeptic would say that for NC =3 it is awfully close to 1…

conclusions
Conclusions
  • We have:
  • Re-derived JP late-time results without requiring the curvature invariant to be finite: all we need is for the metric to exist.
  • Analyzed early-time dynamics and showed that energy density goes to a constant at early times.
  • Have therefore shown that isotropization (and hopefully thermalization) takes place in strong coupling dynamics.
  • Derived a simple formula for isotropization time and used it for heavy ion collisions at RHIC to obtain 0.3 fm/c, in agreement with hydrodynamic simulations.
bonus footage other applications of no branch cuts rule
Bonus Footage: Other Applications of No-branch-cuts Rule

Nakamura, Sin ’06 and Janik ’06 have calculated viscous

corrections to the Bjorken hydrodynamics regime by expanding the metric at late times as

In particular, writing shear viscosity as

one obtains the following coefficient (Janik ‘06):

(but with poles)

bonus footage other applications of no branch cuts rule1
Bonus Footage: Other Applications of No-branch-cuts Rule

To remove the branch cut the coefficient in front of the log

needs to be integers. But it is time dependent!

Hence the prefactor of the log can only be zero!

Equating it to zero yields shear viscosity

in agreement with Kovtun-Polcastro-Son-Starinets (KPSS)

bound! (The connection is shown by Janik ’06.)