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Food and Religion. Hinduism. Hinduism is considered the world’s oldest religion and the basis of other religions. Hinduism was popular throughout much of Asia, most Hindus now live in India. People who practice the Hindu religion don’t eat meat from animals .

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food and religion

Food and Religion

Dr. Dina Qahwaji

hinduism
Hinduism

Dr. Dina Qahwaji

slide3

Hinduism is considered the world’s oldest religion and the basis of other religions.

  • Hinduism was popular throughout much of Asia, most Hindus now live in India.
  • People who practice the Hindu religion don’t eat meat from animals.
  • Animals are believed to have spiritual awareness.

Dr. Dina Qahwaji

slide4

Foods contain energies that can be absorbed by the person who eats them- the Hindu religion takes exactly the saying ‘you are what you eat’.

  • Many Hindus are vegetarian; they stick to concept of avoiding inflicting pain on animal by not eating meat.

Dr. Dina Qahwaji

slide5

Although consumption of meat is allowed, cow considered holy and is not to be killed or eaten. In keeping with the aim to avoid violence or pain to any living thing, vegetarianism is supported, but not required.

  • Complex rules regarding food and drinks are meant to lead to purity of mind and spirit. Pollution is the opposite of purity and should be avoided.

Dr. Dina Qahwaji

slide6

Prohibited animal products tend to vary from one country or area to the next; e.g. duck and crab may be prohibited in one geographical location, but not in another.

  • Foodstuffs such as alcohol, onions and garlic are thought to reduce the Hindu’s quest for spiritual engagement by exciting the body and leading to acts badly are therefore avoided or restricted.

Dr. Dina Qahwaji

slide7

While beef is prohibited, dairy products including milk, butter and yoghurt are considered to improve spiritual purity.

  • Fasting depends on the person’s class (or social standing) and the occasion; e.g. rules regarding fasting depend on whether the day has religious or personal importance.

Dr. Dina Qahwaji

buddhism
Buddhism

Dr. Dina Qahwaji

slide9

Buddhism started in India then declined – now is spread throughout southeast and central Asia.

  • The dietary rules of Buddhism, which is more of a life philosophy than a religious policy, depend on which branch of Buddhism is practiced and in what country.

Dr. Dina Qahwaji

slide10

Buddha believe the idea that all living being go through various forms of death and rebirth, before they took the form of a human being – this is why most Buddhists are vegetarian.

  • Buddhism believes that violence or pain inflicted on others will return on you, further increase the need for a vegetarian lifestyle.

Dr. Dina Qahwaji

slide11

Some Buddhists avoid meat and diary products, while others only avoid beef.

  • Religious dates vary from one region to the next. Mahayana Buddhism, e.g. celebrates three festivals for the birth, engagement and death of Buddha, while Theravada Buddhists observe all three events on a single day.
  • Buddhist monks tend to fast in the afternoon.

Dr. Dina Qahwaji

slide12

Buddhist monks and nuns aren’t allowed to plant, store or cook their own food; instead, they must depend on ‘alms’, which are donations from believers. This sometimes includes meats, as monks and nuns aren’t allowed to ask for specific foods.

  • Traditionally, meat from bears, dogs, elephants, horses, hyenas, lions, snakes and tigers are strictly prohibited to Buddhist monks and nuns.

Dr. Dina Qahwaji