slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Objectives: Define and distinguish between monomers and polymers. PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Objectives: Define and distinguish between monomers and polymers.

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 9

Objectives: Define and distinguish between monomers and polymers. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 71 Views
  • Uploaded on

Objectives: Define and distinguish between monomers and polymers. Compare saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbon structures and properties. Please put your name on NOW! So you don’t forget Catalyst: So far we have learned about alkanes. Describe an alkane.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Objectives: Define and distinguish between monomers and polymers.' - flavio


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Objectives:

Define and distinguish between monomers and polymers.

Compare saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbon structures and properties.

Please put your name on NOW! So you don’t forget

Catalyst: So far we have learned about alkanes.

Describe an alkane.

Describe at least 3 ways that a hydrocarbon molecule be more complex than a simple alkane.

Homework: Read C.5, Do: pg. 279 #6-12

c1 petrochemicals

C1 Petrochemicals

Chemists use hydrocarbons and knowledge of covalent bonding to build new molecules

Until 1800s all materials were natural materials. Eg stone, wood, cotton, silk

Commercially made products: cellulose from wood and shellac from insects. These are polymers – long chain molecules made out of monomers

Modern products are more man-made. Petrochemical – man-made out of petroleum. Eg: insulation, plastic, foam, fabrics like nylon, detergent, pesticides

ethene builder molecule

Ethene – builder molecule

C2H4 Aka ethene

Contains a very reactive double covalent bond,

Addition reactions – add a reactant onto double bond

Etheneand water form ethyl alcohol

slide4

Ethene can do an addition reaction with itself.

Makes polyethylene – contains 500 to 20,000 ethenes linked in a chain

Polyethylene is an example of an “addition polymer”

Other polymers are made from monomers like ethene: vinyl chloride to Polyvinylchloride (PVC)

polymers

Polymers

Polymers can be long straight chains (like spagetti), branched, or cross-linked

c 3 beyond alkanes
C.3 Beyond Alkanes
  • Alkane – a hydrocarbon with all single bonds
  • Alkene – a hydrocarbon with at least one double bond
  • Double covalent bond – two pairs of electrons (total of 4 electrons) are shared.
  • Saturated hydrocarbon – each carbon is bonded to 4 other atoms. It’s “full.”
  • Unsaturated hydrocarbon – not all carbon atoms are bonded to four other atoms.
saturated v unsaturated

Saturated v. Unsaturated

Saturated hydrocarbons – all single covalent bonds between carbons (saturated with the most single bonds it can make)

Unsaturated - have at least one double or triple covalent bond between carbons

(eg, ethene, double)

(eg, propyne, triple)