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Strategies for Writing a DBQ. -The Document-Based Question is an exercise that tests your ability to analyze and synthesize different historical viewpoints. -The primary purpose of the DBQ is to evaluate how you can answer a question from the documentary evidence.

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Presentation Transcript
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-The Document-Based Question is an exercise that tests your ability to analyze and synthesize different historical viewpoints.

-The primary purpose of the DBQ is to evaluate how you can answer a question from the documentary evidence.

-It is not a test of your prior knowledge.

-In writing the DBQ, you act as the historian who must arrive at a conclusion from the available writings.

-There is no single correct answer. By using a variety of documents, you can defend or refute a particular viewpoint.

-There are approximately 10 to 12 documents on the examination.

helpful tips
Helpful Tips
  • 1. Read the questions/historical background carefully. Determine your task. Underline the keywords in the question (analyze, discuss). Write down any information that you can connect to the question or to the historical background.
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2. Read all the documents. Circle key phrases or words in the documents that are related to the main theme.
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3. Take note of the source of the document, and the author’s point of view or bias. Make a chart of the key ideas of each document. Separate them to reflect both sides of the question.
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4. Decide on your thesis statement. Outline the essay. Include an introductory statement that leads up to your thesis.
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5. DO NOT summarize or give a laundry list of documents. Remember to include relevant outside historical facts as long as they are accurate.