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Module 7 Restoring SQL Server 2008 R2 Databases
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  1. Module 7 Restoring SQL Server 2008 R2 Databases

  2. Module Overview • Understanding the Restore Process • Restoring Databases • Working with Point-in-time Recovery • Restoring System Databases and Individual Files

  3. Lesson 1: Understanding the Restore Process • Types of Restores • Preparation for Restoring Backups • Discussion: Determining Required Backups to Restore

  4. Types of Restores Restore Types: Complete Database Restore in Simple recovery model ü Complete Database Restore in Full recovery model ü System Database Restore ü Restoring damaged Files only ü Advanced Restore Options including Online, Piecemeal, Page restore ü

  5. Preparations for Restoring Backups • Perform a tail-log backup if needed • Only applies to full and bulk-logged recovery model • Identify the backups to restore • Last Full, File or Filegroup backup as a base • Last differential backup, if applicable • Log backups if using full and bulk-logged recovery model

  6. Discussion: Determining Required Backups to Restore • Backup schedule • Full database backups Saturday 10PM • Differential backups Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday at 10PM • Log backups every hour (on the hour) from 9AM to 6PM • Failure Occurred at Thursday at 10:30AM • What should restore process should be followed?

  7. Lesson 2: Restoring Databases • Phases of the Restore Process • WITH RECOVERY Option • Restoring a Database • Restoring a Transaction Log • WITH STANDBY Option • Demonstration 2A: Restoring Databases

  8. Phases of the Restore Process • The restore process of a SQL Server 2008 R2 database happens in three phases • Redo and Undo are called Recovery

  9. WITH RECOVERY Option • A database must be recovered before it can be brought online • WITH RECOVERY (default) restore option performs a recovery after restore and brings the database online • WITH NORECOVERY restore option leaves the database in a recovering state • Allows additional restore operations on the database • Restore process always involves • WITH NORECOVERY for all backups restored except the last • WITH RECOVERY for the last backup restored

  10. Restoring a Database • Full and differential backups are restored using the RESTORE DATABASE statement • Only the last differential backup needs to be restored • Restore each backup in order and WITH NORECOVERY, if additional transaction log backups need to be restored RESTOREDATABASE AdventureWorks2008R2 FROMDISK='D:\SQLBackups\AW.bak' WITHRECOVERY; GO

  11. Restoring a Transaction Log • Transaction Log Backups are restored using the RESTORE LOG statement • An unbroken log chain sequence must be provided RESTORELOG Payroll FROMDISK='D:\SQLBackups\PayrollLogs.bak' WITHNORECOVERY; GO

  12. WITH STANDBY Option • Allows read-only access to an unrecovered database • A standby file is used to hold undo phase details • Main usage scenarios are: • Creating a Standby Server with read-only access to the data (Log Shipping) • Inspecting a database between log restores RESTORELOG Payroll FROMDISK='D:\Backups\PyLg.bak' WITHSTANDBY ='D:\Backups\ULog.bak';

  13. Demonstration 2A: Restoring Databases • In this demonstration, you will see how to restore databases in full recovery model

  14. Lesson 3: Working with Point-in-time Recovery • Overview of Point-in-time Recovery • STOPAT Option • Discussion: Synchronizing Recovery of Multiple Databases • STOPATMARK Option • Demonstration 3A: Using STOPATMARK

  15. Overview of Point-in-time Recovery • Enables recovery of a database up to a point in time • Point in time can be defined by: • datetime value provided • mark set through a named transaction • Database must be in FULL recovery model • Logs may contain BULK_LOGGED sections • If the transaction log backup containing the point in time includes minimally-logged operations, the restore fails

  16. STOPAT Option • Can be utilized from SSMS or T-SQL • Provide STOPAT with RECOVERY as part of all RESTORE statements in the sequence • No need to know in which transaction log backup the requested point in time resides • If the point in time is after the time included in the backup, a warning will be issued and the database will not be recovered • If the point in time is before the time included in the backup, the RESTORE statement fails • If the point in time provided is within the time frame of the backup, the database is recovered up to that point

  17. Discussion: Synchronizing Recovery of Multiple Databases • An application might use data in more than a single database, including data in multiple SQL Server instances • Do you use any multi-database applications? • What problems might occur when the databases need to be restored? • Why might restoring up to a point in time not be sufficient?

  18. STOPATMARK Option • Can only be performed using T-SQL • Transactions marked using: • BEGIN TRAN <name> WITH MARK <description> • Restore has two related options: • STOPATMARK rolls forward to the mark and includes the marked transaction in the roll forward • STOPBEFOREMARK rolls forward to the mark and excludes marked the transaction from the roll forward • If the mark is not present in the transaction log backup, the backup is restored, but the database is not recovered

  19. Demonstration 3A: Using STOPATMARK • In this demonstration you will see how to restore a database up to a mark in transaction log

  20. Lesson 4: Restoring System Databases and Individual Files • Recovering System Databases • Restoring the master Database • Restoring a File or Filegroup from a Backup • Demonstration 4A: Restoring a File

  21. Recovering System Databases

  22. Restoring the master Database Start the server instance in single user mode 1. Use the RESTORE DATABASE statement to restore a full database backup of the master database 2. SQL will shut down and terminate the SQLCMD process 3. Restart SQL Server normally (not single user) 4.

  23. Restoring a File or Filegroup from a Backup Create a tail-log backup 1. Restore damaged file or filegroup from a recent backup 2. Restore differential file backups 3. Restore transaction logs sequentially * 4. Recover the database 5. * Restore the transaction log backups in sequence starting with the log that covers the oldest file and ending with the tail-log (Full/Bulk-Logged Recovery Models Only)

  24. Demonstration 4A: Restoring a File • In this demonstration, you will see how to restore a file from a full database backup in full recovery mode

  25. Lab 7: Restoring SQL Server 2008 R2 Databases • Exercise 1: Determine a restore strategy • Exercise 2: Restore the database • Challenge Exercise 3: Using STANDBY mode (Only if time permits) Logon information Estimated time: 45minutes

  26. Lab Scenario You have performed a database backup for the Proseware, Inc. databases. You need to test the database restore process. You have been provided with a series of backups taken from a database on another server that you need to restore to the Proseware, Inc. server with the database name MarketYields. The backup file includes a number of full, differential, and log backups. You need to identify backups contained within the file, determine which backups need to be restored, and perform the restore operations. When you restore the database, you need to ensure that it is left as a warm standby, as additional log backups may be applied at a later date. If you have time, you should test the standby operation.

  27. Lab Review • Why does STANDBY mode require an operating system file? • If the last restore on a database was performed WITH NORECOVERY and no further transaction logs are available, how can the database be brought online?

  28. Module Review and Takeaways • Review Questions • Best Practices