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Transporting Our Youngest Learners: Best Practices and Policy Considerations. WV Pre-K and Transportation Requirements. Supervision of Young Children. Loading and Unloading. Is Transportation Required? According to WVBE Policy 2525

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Presentation Transcript
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WV Pre-K and Transportation Requirements

Supervision of Young Children

Loading and Unloading

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Is Transportation Required?

According to WVBE Policy 2525

§126-28-8.26 - For programs participating in the county collaborative plan, transportation is considered a support, not a mandated service, unless it is a related service for children with disabilities in accordance with state and federal requirements.

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8.26.2. 

Children transported by a school bus who attend a pre-k classroom and are not yet enrolled in kindergarten will sit in a segregated area of the vehicle with other pre-k children.

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8.26.3. 

  • Staff shall be available to assist children on and off buses at the WV Pre-k site.
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8.26.3. 

If a parent/guardian is unable to meet the bus, there shall be a person designated by the parent/guardian to assist the child.

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8.26.3.

Bus drivers must inspect the bus at all final drop off points to assure that no children are left on the bus and these inspections must be charted.  A log of daily inspections shall be maintained on file with the principal/supervisor. 

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8.26.3. 

At each pre-k site where bus transportation is provided, a designated person must follow-up with the family of any child who is not present or accounted for each day.

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Scary Facts

Drivers can lose sight of very young children as opposed to bigger, older students.

Small children have been known to climb into wheel wells.

Young children can be thrown more easily from their seats.

Young children are more often left on the school bus at the end of a route, posing danger to the child in excess heat or cold.

Younger children do not process sounds the same way as older children.

Younger children have 1/3 less peripheral vision than older children.

Younger children have shorter attention spans than older children.

Younger children do not judge moving objects well (do not perceive an approaching vehicle’s changing size as a threat).

The size of a young child makes it difficult to step up on school bus steps.

High windows do not allow younger children to see out the school bus window.

Most importantly, young children should be included in emergency evacuation drills and taught how to evacuate with other children

language milestones
Language Milestones
  • Say his or her name and age
  • Speak 250 to 500 words
  • Answer simple questions
  • Speak in sentences of five to six words, and speak in complete sentences by age 4
  • Speak clearly
  • Tell stories
cognitive milestones
Cognitive Milestones
  • Correctly name familiar colors
  • Understand the idea of same and different
  • Pretend and fantasize more creatively
  • Follow three-part commands
  • Remember parts of a story
  • Understand time better (for example, morning, afternoon, night)
  • Count, and understand the concept of counting
  • Sort objects by shape and color
  • Complete age-appropriate puzzles
  • Recognize and identify common objects and pictures
social emotional milestones
Social/Emotional Milestones
  • Imitate parents and friends
  • Show affection for familiar family and friends
  • Understands the idea of "mine" and "his/hers"
  • Show a wide range of emotions, such as being sad, angry, happy, or bored
  • In addition, you may notice your child's imagination is in overdrive. This can be good and bad. Fantasy and pretend play becomes more interesting and involved, but your child may also start developing unrealistic fears, such as believing a monster is lurking in the closet………
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…..or

ON THE BUS!!!!!

positive approaches to discipline
Positive Approaches to Discipline
  • The goal of transportation staff should be for routines and transitions to occur in a timely, predictable, and un-rushed manner (45 CFR 1304.21(a)(3)(ii)). These would include:
    • How to board the vehicle
    • How to take one's seat on the vehicle
    • How and when to leave one's seat on the vehicle
    • How to exit from the vehicle
    • How to participate in a bud evacuation drill
positive approaches to discipline1
Positive Approaches to Discipline

2. Help children understand the words that name things in the bus and are used in the procedures:

  • Aisle
  • Door
  • Emergency Exit
  • Handrail
  • Restraint System
  • Seat
  • Seat Belt
  • Step
  • Window
positive approaches to discipline2
Positive Approaches to Discipline
  • Your attitude can influence the expectations of students both positively and negatively.
    • Be calm
    • Speak clearly and with consistency about what children are expected to do and use the child's name when speaking to that individual.
  • Remember that the need for discipline arises when children fail to understand the procedures.
    • Don’t ridicule or embarrass the child.
    • Repeat the procedure that is desired and encourage children to practice it.
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§126-28-8.26.3

At the WV Pre-K Site

Who is designated to assist children on and off the bus?

Where do the children go after exiting the bus?

What if the designee is not there to assist?

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§126-28-8.26.3

At the Child’s Pick-up/Drop-off Site

Are parents required to meet the bus daily?

What is the county’s procedure for a family to designate another?

Who can be designated?

What are the procedures if the parent or designee is not at the drop-off site?

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§126-28-8.26.3

Seating Arrangements

8.26.2 – Children transported by a school bus who attend a pre-k classroom and are not yet enrolled in kindergarten will sit in a segregated area of the vehicle with other pre-k children.

Where is the best location?

Why? Based on Goal 2 – How will segregated area assist with supervision?

Can a pre-k child be seated with older siblings?

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§126-28-8.26.3

Documenting Daily Inspections

Bus drivers must inspect the bus at all final drop off points to assure that no children are left on the bus and these inspections must be documented.

A log of daily inspections shall be maintained on file with the principal/supervisor.

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§126-28-8.26.3

  • WV Pre-K Site Designee
  • Who is the pre-k designee at the WV Pre-K Site?
  • What is the communication process for the bus driver and pre-k designee for any pre-k child not present?
  • At each pre-k site where bus transportation is provided, a designated person must follow-up with the family of any child who is not present or accounted for each day.