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The Coronation of Emperor Napoleon I - 1801, Jacques-Louis David PowerPoint Presentation
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The Coronation of Emperor Napoleon I - 1801, Jacques-Louis David - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Neoclassical style: 1760s-1850s; Inspired by "classical" art and culture of ancient Greece and Rome; Emphasis on stark linear design—straight lines—in the depiction of classical themes, such as historical and religious figures, using historically correct settings and costumes.

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slide1

Neoclassical style: 1760s-1850s; Inspired by "classical" art and culture of ancient Greece and Rome;

Emphasis on stark linear design—straight lines—in the depiction of classical themes, such as historical and religious figures, using historically correct settings and costumes.

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Impressionism: 1867-1886; attempted to accurately and objectively record visual reality in terms of changing effects of light and color.

- Landscapes and still life portraits.

Characteristics: brush strokes were thin, yet visible; emphasis on accurate depiction of light, often accentuating or highlighting the effects of the passage of time and movement as a crucial element of human perception and experience; subjects tended to be common and ordinary and placed at unusual angles.

Painters included: Claude Monet, Pierre Auguste Renoir, Camille Pissarro, Edgar Degas, Paul Cezanne, and EdouardManet.

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Post-impressionism: 1880s-1930s; An extension of Impressionism and a rejection of that style’s attempt to objectively depict what is seen in nature

Painters included: Paul Cezanne, Georges Seurat, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, and Henri Toulouse-Lautrec

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Parade – Georges Seurat, 1888Pointillism: practice in art of applying small strokes or dots of color to a surface so that from a distance they blend together detail on the right

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Art Nouveau (new art) : 1890-1920s; A style of decoration, posters, jewelry, furniture and architecture, characterized particularly by the depiction of leaves and flowers in flowing, curvy lines.

It was a deliberate attempt to create a new style that did not try to imitate historical art (such as neoclassical).

Art Nouveau artists: Henri Toulouse Lautrec, Alphonse Mucha, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Antonio Gaudi

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Cubism: Emphasized the flat, two-dimensional surface; rejected traditional techniques of perspective and modeling and beliefs that art should imitate nature.

Cubist painters were not bound to copying form, texture, color, and space; instead, they presented a new reality in painting and depicted radically fragmented or broken apart objects.

Painters: Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque, Robert Delaunay, Juan Gris

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Ville de Paris – by Robert Delaunay, 1910 Orphism: Cubist paintings that gave priority to color. The movement was named in 1912 by the French poet Guillaume Appolinaire.

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Surrealism: 1910s-1940s; produced works of “anti-art” that deliberately defied reason or made no sense on purpose.

Surrealism attempted to join the dream world and everyday rational world in “an absolute reality, a surreality.”

Surrealism was inspired by Dadaism.

Its proponents favored group collaboration, spontaneity, and chance. In rejection of traditional modes of artistic creation, many Dadaists worked in collage, photomontage, and found-object construction, rather than in painting and sculpture

Painters: Jean Arp, Max Ernst, Andre Masson, Rene Magritte, Yves Tanguy, Salvador Dali

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Harlem Renaissance: 1910s-1930s, a blossoming of African American culture that was the most influential movement in African American literary history.

Embracing literary, musical, theatrical, and visual arts, participants sought to reconceptualize “the Negro” apart from the white stereotypes that had influenced black peoples’ relationship to their heritage and to each other.

They also sought to break free of Victorian moral values and bourgeois shame about aspects of their lives that might, as seen by whites, reinforce racist beliefs

Artists/writers: Langston Hughes, W.E.B DuBois, Louis Armstrong, Josephine Baker

the weary blues 1923 by langston hughes
The Weary Blues – 1923, by Langston Hughes

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KyqwvC5s4n8&safety_mode=true&persist_safety_mode=1&safe=active

josephine baker dancing as princess tamtam 1935
Josephine Baker – Dancing as Princess TamTam, 1935
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DFf04zGVhKo&safety_mode=true&persist_safety_mode=1&safe=active