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Chapter 4: Basic Properties of Feedback. Chapter Overview. Perspective on Properties of Feedback. Control of a dynamic process begins with: a model , & a description of what the control is required to do. Examples of Control Specifications. Stability of the closed-loop system

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Chapter 4: Basic Properties of Feedback


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    1. Chapter 4: Basic Properties of Feedback Chapter Overview

    2. Perspective on Properties of Feedback Control of a dynamic process begins with: • a model, & • a description of what the control is required to do.

    3. Examples of Control Specifications • Stability of the closed-loop system • The dynamic properties such as rise time and overshootin response to step in either the reference or the disturbance input. • The sensitivity of the system to changes in model parameters • The permissible steady-state error to a constant input or constant disturbance signal. • The permissible steady-state tracking error to a polynomial reference signal (such as a ramp or polynomial inputs of higher degrees)

    4. Learning Goals • Open-loop & feedback control characteristics with respect to steady-state errors (= ess) in: Sensitivity Disturbance rejection (disturbance inputs) & Reference tracking to simple parameter changes. • Concept of system type and error constants • Elementarydynamic feedback controllers: P, PD, PI, PID

    5. Chapter 4: Basic Properties of Feedback Part A: Basic Equation of Unity Feedback Control

    6. Block Diagram controller disturbance plant input error output forward path amplification gain or transfer function of the plant sensor noise

    7. Closed-Loop Transfer Function Case 1: D = 0 and N = 0

    8. Closed-loop Transfer Function Case 2: R = 0 and D = 0

    9. Closed-loop Transfer Function Case 3: R = 0 and N = 0

    10. Closed-loop Transfer Function Case 4: R, D, N 0

    11. Error Case 4: R, D, N 0

    12. Chapter 4: Basic Properties of Feedback Part B: Comparison between Open-loop and Feedback Control

    13. 1.Sensitivity of Steady-State System Gain to Parameter Changes • The change might come about because of external effects such as temperature changes or might simply be due to an error in the value of the parameter from the start. • Suppose that the plant gain in operation differs from its original design value of G to be G+δG. • As a result, the overall transfer function T becomes T+δT.

    14. Sensitivity of System Gain to Parameter Changes • By definition, the sensitivity, S, of the gain, G, with respect to the forward path amplification, Kp, is given by:

    15. Sensitivity of System Gain in open-loop control In an open-loop control, the output Y(s) is directly influenced by the plant model change δG.

    16. Sensitivity of System Gain in closed-loop control In a feedback control, the output sensitivity can be reduced by properly designing Kp

    17. 2. Disturbance Rejection • Suppose that a disturbance input, N(s), interacts with the applied input, R(s). • Let us compare open-loop control with feedback control with respect to how well each system maintains a constant steady state reference output in the face of external disturbances

    18. Disturbance Rejection in open-loop control In an open-loop control, disturbances directly affects the output.

    19. Disturbance Rejection in closed-loop control In a feedback control, Disturbances D can be substantially reduced by properly designing Kp

    20. 3. Reference Tracking in closed-loop control In a feedback control, an input R can be accurately tracked by properly designing Kp

    21. 4. Sensor Noise Attenuation in closed-loop control In a feedback control, the noise R can be substantially reduced by properly designing Kp

    22. 5. Advantages of Feedback in Control Compared to open-loop control, feedback can be used to: • Reduce the sensitivity of a system’s transfer function to parameter changes • Reduce steady-state error in response to disturbances, • Reduce steady-state error in tracking areference response (& speed up the transient response) • Stabilize an unstable process

    23. 6. Disadvantages of Feedback in Control Compared to open-loop control, • Feedback requires asensor that can be very expensive and may introduce additional noise • Feedback systems are often more difficult to design and operate than open-loop systems • Feedback changes the dynamic response (faster) but often makes the system less stable.

    24. Chapter 4: Basic Properties of Feedback Part C: System Types & Error Constants

    25. Introduction • Errors in a control system can be attributed to many factors: • Imperfections in the system components (e.g. static friction, amplifier drift, aging, deterioration, etc…) • Changes in the reference inputs cause errors during transient periods & may cause steady-state errors. • In this section, we shall investigate a type of steady-state error that is caused by the incapability of a system to follow particular types of inputs.

    26. Steady-State Errors with Respect to Types of Inputs • Any physical control system inherently suffers steady-state response to certain types of inputs. • A system may have no steady-state error to a step input, but the same system exhibit nonzero steady-state error to a ramp input. • Whether a given unity feedback system will exhibit steady-state error for a given type of input depends on the type of loop gain of the system.

    27. Classification of Control System • Control systems may be classified according to their ability to track polynomial inputs, or in other words, their ability to reach zero steady-state to step-inputs, ramp inputs, parabolic inputs and so on. • This is a reasonable classification scheme because actual inputs may frequently be considered combinations of such inputs. • The magnitude of the steady-state errors due to these individual inputs are indicative of the goodness of the system.

    28. The Unity Feedback Control Case

    29. Steady-State Error • Error: • Using the FVT, the steady-state error is given by: FVT

    30. Steady-state error to polynomial input- Unity Feedback Control - • Consider a polynomial input: • The steady-state error is then given by:

    31. System Type A unity feedback system is defined to be type k if the feedback system guarantees:

    32. System Type (cont’d) • Since, for an input the system is called a type k system if:

    33. Example 1: Unity feedback • Given a stable system whose the open-loop transfer function is: subjected to inputs • Step function: • Ramp function:  The system is type 1

    34. Example 2: Unity feedback • Given a stable system whose the open-loop transfer function is: subjected to inputs • Step function: • Ramp function: • Parabola function:  type 2

    35. Example 3: Unity feedback • Given a stable system whose the open loop transfer function is: subjected to inputs • Step function: • Impulse function:  The system is type 0

    36. Summary – Unity Feedback • Assuming , unity system loop transfers such as:  type 0  type 1  type 2  type n

    37. General Rule – Unity Feedback • An unity feedback system is of type k if the open-loop transfer function of the system has: k poles at s=0 In other words, • An unity feedback system is of type k if the open-loop transfer function of the system has: k integrators

    38. Error Constants • A stable unity feedback system is type k with respect to reference inputs if the openloop transfer function has k poles at the origin: Then the error constant is given by: • The higher the constants, the smaller the steady-state error.

    39. Error Constants • For a Type 0 System, the error constant, called position constant, is given by: • For a Type 1 System, the error constant, called velocity constant, is given by: • For a Type 2 System, the error constant, called acceleration constant, is given by: (dimensionless)

    40. Steady-State Errors as a function of System Type – Unity Feedback

    41. Example: • A temperature control system is found to have zero error to a constant tracking input and an error of 0.5oC to a tracking input that is linear in time, rising at the rate of 40oC/sec. • What is the system type? • What is the steady-state error? • What is the error constant? The system is type 1

    42. Conclusion • Classifying a system ask type indicates the ability of the system to achieve zero steady-state error to polynomials r(t) of degree less but not equal to k. • The system is type k if the error is zero to all polynomials r(t) of degree less than k but non-zero for a polynomial of degree k.

    43. Conclusion • A stable unity feedback system is type k with respect to reference inputs if the loop transfer function has k poles at the origin: • Then the error constant is given by:

    44. Chapter 4: Basic Properties of Feedback Part D: The Classical Three- Term Controllers

    45. Basic Operations of a Feedback Control Think of what goes on in domestic hot water thermostat: • The temperature of the water is measured. • Comparison of the measured and the required values provides an error, e.g.“too hot’ or ‘too cold’. • On the basis of error, a control algorithm decides what to do.  Such an algorithm might be: • If the temperature is too high then turn the heater off. • If it is too low then turn the heater on • The adjustment chosen by the control algorithm is applied to some adjustable variable, such as the power input to the water heater.

    46. Feedback Control Properties • A feedback control system seeks to bring the measured quantity to its required value or set-point. • The control systemdoes not need to know why the measured value is not currently what is required, only that is so. • There are two possible causes of such a disparity: • The system has been disturbed. • The setpoint has changed. In the absence of external disturbance, a change in setpoint will introduce an error. The control system will act until the measured quantity reach its new setpoint.

    47. The PID Algorithm • The PID algorithm is the most popular feedback controller algorithm used. It is a robust easily understood algorithm that can provide excellent control performance despite the varied dynamic characteristics of processes. • As the name suggests, the PID algorithm consists of three basic modes: the Proportional mode, the Integral mode & the Derivative mode.

    48. P, PI or PID Controller • When utilizing the PID algorithm, it is necessary to decide which modes are to be used (P, I or D) and then specify the parameters (or settings) for each mode used. • Generally, three basic algorithms are used: P, PI or PID. • Controllers are designed to eliminate the need for continuous operator attention.  Cruise control in a car and a house thermostat are common examples of how controllers are used to automatically adjust some variable to hold a measurement (or process variable) to a desired variable (or set-point)

    49. Controller Output • The variable being controlled is the output of the controller (and the input of the plant): • The output of the controller will change in response to a change in measurement or set-point (that said a change in the tracking error) provides excitation to the plant system to be controlled

    50. PID Controller • In the s-domain, the PID controller may be represented as: • In the time domain: proportional gain integral gain derivative gain