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U8 & U10 COACH’S MEETING. CLUB MEMBERSHIP OVERVIEW. Membership numbers . Coach & Team numbers. Recreational: 1100 (75\%) In-House: 825 Academy: 75 Travel: 200 Select : 300 (21\%) Classic: 240 State: 60 Adult Recreational: 60 (4\%) Membership gender breakout 55\% Female 45\% Male.

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club membership overview
CLUB MEMBERSHIP OVERVIEW

Membership numbers

Coach & Team numbers

Recreational: 1100 (75%)

In-House: 825

Academy: 75

Travel: 200

Select: 300 (21%)

Classic: 240

State: 60

Adult Recreational: 60 (4%)

Membership gender breakout

55% Female

45% Male

Coaches

Recreational: 175

Academy: 10

Select: 35

Teams

Recreational: 85

In-House: 77

Travel: 8

Academy: 10

Select: 16

Classic: 12

State: 4

internationally
INTERNATIONALLY
  • FIFA:Int’l Governing Body
  • CONCACAF: Governs North America, Central America and the Caribbean
nationally
NATIONALLY
  • US SOCCER: governing body for all soccer in the U.S.
  • US YOUTH SOCCER(USYS):our National youth affiliate
  • WI YOUTH SOCCER (WYSA): governing body under USYS
  • EAST CENTRAL SOCCER DISTRICT (EC): District under WYSA.
  • UNITED HURRICANES (UH)
united hurricanes soccer club
UNITED HURRICANES SOCCER CLUB

United Hurricanes Soccer Club was established in 2013 as a result of the merger of two forward thinking clubs; HS United (est. 1981) and the Howard Hurricanes (est. 1989).  Together we will work tirelessly to change the face of soccer in the Green Bay area and provide the best possible opportunities for ALL of our players.

slide9
Provide a player-centric club atmosphere for families where each player is given the opportunity to play soccer in a supportive and rewarding environment.
  • Emphasizing fun, enjoyment and skill learning at a level that fits his/her interest and ability.
  • While also creating a challenging environment for talented players who aspire to reach their full potential.
slide13
LONG-TERM

PLAYER DEVELOPMENTA comprehensive development approach

long term player development ltpd
LONG-TERM PLAYER DEVELOPMENT (LTPD)
  • A COMPREHENSIVE APPROACH
    • Player centered
    • Holistic
    • Developmentally appropriate curriculum
in order to learn develop children require
In order to learn & develop, children require:
  • Relationships with responsive adults
  • Active, hands-on involvement
  • Meaningful experiences
  • Opportunities to construct their understanding of the world (a process supported by the three previous constructs)
basic principles of developmentally appropriate
Basic principles of developmentally appropriate:
  • All domains of child development (social, emotional, physical, cognitive) are important and interrelated.
  • Many aspects of child development follow a consistent documented progression, with later skills and proficiencies building upon the others already acquired.
basic principles of developmentally appropriate1
Basic principles of developmentally appropriate:
  • Rates of development vary from child to child and even vary between domains of development within the individual child.
  • Development and learning takes place within the dynamic interaction of both biological maturation and personal experience.
  • Early experiences have profound effects, and there are optimal periods for certain types of learning and development.
basic principles of developmentally appropriate2
Basic principles of developmentally appropriate:
  • Play is an important vehicle for developing self-regulation as well as social, language, and cognitive development.
  • Development and learning are advanced when children are challenged just above their competency and when they have many opportunities to practice new skills.
basic principles of developmentally appropriate3
Basic principles of developmentally appropriate:
  • Children’s experiences shape their motivation and approach to learning (persistence, initiative, flexibility) and these dispositions in turn influence their learning and development.
slide22
Roadmap of learning objectives
  • Where are we going
  • How do we get there
  • The WHO, WHAT , WHERE , WHEN, WHY AND HOW
slide24
THE PLAYERS

ALL DECISIONS ARE BASED ON ONE QUESTION…

“IS THIS WHAT IS BEST FOR THE PLAYERS”

slide26
RIGHT HERE AND
  • RIGHT NOW
  • The time for questioning is done, the answer is clear, there is no need to wait.
ltpd objectives
Ltpd OBJECTIVES
  • More individual time on the ball
  • More DECISION MAKING opportunities without the fear of failure
  • Acceptance of making MISTAKES
  • Embrace Individuality
  • Encourage CREATIVITY
ltpd objectives1
Ltpd OBJECTIVES

Develop players who:

  • Are well-rounded, confident & SKILLED
  • Play with integrity, CREATIVITY & passion
  • LOVE the game
  • Play for a LIFETIME
slide31
AGE SPECIFIC DETAILED PLAN (U4/U6/U8etc.)
  • Based on Developmental Characteristics of the age group.
  • Season long plan
  • Followed by all teams within an age group
  • Focused on the individual
  • Players participate in all subjects
education
EDUCATION
  • BOARD
  • COACHES
  • MANAGERS
  • PARENTS
  • COMMUNITY
coaches are the teachers
COACHES are the TEACHERS
  • OUR COACHES MUST
    • Understand the characteristics of the age group
    • Create a positive environment for learning
    • Make sessions enjoyable and fun
    • Allow players to learn at their own pace
    • Allow players to play their game
    • Educate themselves about the game and LTPD
age specific curricula
AGE SPECIFIC CURRICULA
  • Appropriate in these areas of development
    • PHYSICAL (psychomotor)
    • COGNITIVE (mental/psychological)
    • SOCIALLY (psychosocial)
  • ALL children develop at different rates at different times
    • LTPD allows players to learn at their own pace
    • Age appropriate lessons and player expectations
    • INCLUSIVE- no selecting out
  • Allows for differentiation/individualization
slide36
TOOL BOX OF COACHING APPROACHES DESIGNED TO ENHANCE THE INDIVIDUALS DEVELOPMENTAL EXPERIENCE

SLANTY LINE THEORY

GUIDED DISCOVERY

SMALL SIDED GAMES

differentiation slanty line theory
DifferentiationSLANTY LINE THEORY

STRAIGHT-LINE APPROACH

High-water / Low-watergame- the rope starts on the ground and everyone jumps over it...Then two children raise the rope to a new level. As children are unable to jump over the rope they are ELIMINATED until only one person is left...

The problem: It ELIMINATES those who need the activity the most

differentiation slanty line theory1
DifferentiationSLANTY LINE THEORY

SLANTY LINE

Mosstontakes the same rope and SLANTS IT.

Now…

  • Each child can participate at THEIR OWN ABILITY LEVEL
  • Each child is CHALLENGED

Children will not continue activities in which they are continually eliminated or wait to take turns.

Given opportunities, children seek out challenges and take risks.

how do we apply the slanty line theory to training
HOW DO WE APPLY THE SLANTY LINE THEORY TO TRAINING?
  • Discreetly
    • This method is intended to increase player success
  • General application- full group
    • Can you beat your score?
      • Players are competing against themselves and their challenge is relative to their current level
  • Specific application- individuals
    • Address players individually in the flow of the activity to increase or decrease their challenge
  • Group application- divide group by ability on that skill
    • Address groups individually in the flow of the activity to increase or decrease their challenge
what is it
What is it?
  • Method that uses effective age appropriate questioning
    • Guided questions
    • Empowers players to discover

“I hear and I forget, I see and I remember, I do and I understand’ - Confucius

why use guided discovery
WHY USE GUIDED DISCOVERY
  • It improves the learning process for the players- active learners
  • It gives the players the opportunity to practice problem solving-real time
  • It empowers players to make decisions and take risks

“Asking the right questions takes as much skill as giving the right answers.” - Robert Half

examples of u6 u8 questions
Examples of u6 & u8 Questions
  • What should you do to see where your teammates are?
  • What part of the foot do you use to make a short pass?
  • Where should you aim when shooting on goal?

EXAMPLES OF U10 & U12 QUESTIONS

  • How can we get the ball down the field quickly?
  • What happens when you pass the ball behind your teammate?

THERE ARE NO WRONG ANSWERS!

MAY NEED TO REPHRASE THE QUESTION

positive coaching responses
Positive Coaching Responses...
  • Good idea! Can you show me?
  • Great....so how could we do it faster?
  • I like that answer...what other skill can we use to get the ball to our teammates?
  • Now you’re getting the idea!
effective questioning
Effective Questioning
  • Need to pre-plan questions
  • Gain the players attention
  • When is it appropriate to ask questions
  • Wait time for responses
  • Reinforcement
  • Prompting/Probing
  • Distributing questions
pitfalls
Pitfalls
  • Players sometimes answer without real thought, they just call out catchwords or phrases they have heard from the coach i.e. space, pressure
  • Rhetorical questions
  • Not giving players time to think and respond
  • Too many questions sequentially
what are small sided games
WHAT ARE SMALL-SIDED GAMES?

Games played on smaller fields with fewer than 11 players a side

BENEFITS OF SMALL-SIDED GAMES

  • Skill development; more touches on the ball
  • Tactical development; more decision making opportunities
  • Fun and enjoyment; goal scoring chances increased
  • Game understanding; positional play is greatly expanded
  • Intuitive development; transitional play is increased and becomes automatic
uh small sided games
UH small-sided games
  • U4 play 3v3 (no goalkeeper)
  • U6 play 3v3 (no goalkeeper)
  • U8 play 4v4 (no goalkeeper)
  • U10 play 6v6 (5+ goalkeeper)
  • U12 play 8v8 (7+ goalkeeper)
slide51
POSSESSION PHILOSOPHY

& GAME FORMATIONS

possession philosophy
POSSESSION PHILOSOPHY
    • DEEMPHASIZING THE LONG BALL
    • Playing the ‘long ball’ is counterproductive to long-term individual, as well as collective, development
    • They will get scored on-they will lose possession-It’s ok!
        • We will not compromise for short term results
  • Learning to play the ball out from the back is essential for development
    • All teams must feel comfortable playing the ball from the back through the midfield and from there to the final quarter of the field
possession philosophy offense defense quick transition
POSSESSION PHILOSOPHYOFFENSE-DEFENSE QUICK TRANSITION
  • When we have the ball
    • WE ARE ALL PLAYING OFFENSE
  • When they have the ball
    • WE ARE ALL PLAYING DEFENSE
uh formations
UH FORMATIONS

Per the US Soccer Curriculum Guidelines, UH teams will play in the following formations.

  • 4-a-side = 2-2
  • 6-a-side = 2-1-2
  • 8-a-side = 3-3-1
  • 11-a-side = 4-3-3/4-4-2
u8 u10 2 2 2 1 2
U8 U10 2-2 2-1-2
role of the u8 coach
Role of the U8 Coach

The role of the coach in the U8 age group is to be a sensitive and patient teacher with an enthusiastic and imaginative approach.

coaches
COACHES

It is not important that you be a good soccer player to be a good soccer coach.

It is important that you be able to connect with the children on their level.

licensing requirements
Licensing Requirements

The State Youth Module (Y1) is required.

The National Youth License is recommended.

mental psychological cognitive
Mental / Psychological (cognitive)
  • Short attention span, but better than U6
  • Love to use their imagination…pretend
  • Limited ability to attend to more than one task at a time
  • Beginning to solve simple soccer problems (i.e. pass to a teammate)
physical psychomotor
Physical (psychomotor)
  • Beginning to develop physical coordination
  • Improvement in pace regulation
  • Catching skills are still not developed
  • Improvement in dribbling and kicking
  • Love to run, jump, fall and roll
socially psychosocial
Socially (psychosocial)
  • Sensitive-dislike personal failure in front of peers
  • Negative comments from peers and adults carry great weight
  • Inclined to establish and cooperate with friends
  • Limited experience with personal evaluation…effort is synonymous with successful performance
  • Like to play soccer because it is FUN; intrinsically motivated; play for enjoyment
techniques skills
Techniques (skills)
  • Dribbling
    • With outside of the foot
    • Change of speed and direction
  • Receiving
    • Ground balls with inside, outside, and sole of foot
    • Bouncing balls with various body parts
    • Ball lifting and juggling
  • Passing
    • With toe, inside of foot and laces
  • Shooting
    • With toe, inside of foot and laces
  • Tackling
    • Toe-poke
psychology mental and social
Psychology (mental and social)
  • Working in pairs
  • Sportsmanship
  • “How to play” (social cooperation)
  • Dealing with parental involvement
  • Emotional management

PHYSICAL

  • Agility
  • Eye/foot & eye/hand coordination
tactics decisions
Tactics (decisions)
  • Transition
  • Being exposed to all positions
  • 1 v 1 attacking & defending
  • 2v1 attacking
  • Introduce the names of positions (forwards, defenders)
  • Shape (triangles)
u8 development note
U8 DEVELOPMENT NOTE

It should be noted, the US Soccer Curriculum places no emphasis on tactics at the U8 levels. Organization, positional play, and game outcomes should not be a part of the training program. Set plays and patterns of play are not considered age appropriate, primarily because any focus on teaching those things will take time away from technical instruction. 


why no goalkeeper at u8
WHY NO GOALKEEPER AT U8?

55 USA state soccer association technical directors on the position of goalkeeper:

“We believe goalkeepers should not be a feature of play at the U-6 and U-8 age groups.

All players in these age groups should be allowed to run around the field and chase the toy – the ball. For teams in the U-10 and older age groups, goalkeepers should become a regular feature of play. However, young players in the U-10, U- 12 and U-14 age groups should not begin to specialize in any position at this time in their development.”

slide73
WHY NO GOALKEEPER AT U8?
  • Children want to run, kick the ball and score goals.
  • Need to know how to play as a field player first.
  • Developmentally not ready- visual tracking acuity not developed until 9-10 yrs old
    • Can only react not anticipate
u8 objectives goals
U8 OBJECTIVES & GOALS

U7 PLAYERS

U8 PLAYERS

SCRIMMAGE:

Take up good positions during the game

TECHNICAL:

Improve basic individual technique

PHYSICAL:

Develop coordination and basic motor skills with and without the ball

PSYCHOSOCIAL:

Increase confidence with the ball

SCRIMMAGE:

Balance in relation to the ball and teammates during the game

TECHNICAL:

Individual and collective basic soccer techniques

PHYSICAL:

Develop speed, coordination and basic motor skills

PSYCHOSOCIAL:

Interact with teammates during training sessions

by the end of the season the u8 player must be capable of
BY THE END OF THE SEASON THE U8 PLAYER MUST BE CAPABLE OF:

U7 PLAYERS

U8 PLAYERS

Handling the ball with both feet

Occupying the original position during the game once an action is finished

Basic coordinated movements with and without the ball

Stopping and running with the ball at speed

Moving forward when attacking and retreating when defending

Basic quick movements with and without the ball

role of the u10 coach
Role of the U10 Coach

The role of the coach in the U10 age group is to be a patient and motivating teacher. At this level, in addition to understanding technique, coaches should be able to provide environments conducive to problem solving (decision-making) by the players utilizing guided discovery methods.

coaches1
COACHES

It is not important that you be a good soccer player to be a good soccer coach.

It is important that you be able to connect with the children on their level.

licensing requirements1
Licensing Requirements

The State Youth Module (Y1) is required.

The National Youth License is recommended.

mental psychological cognitive1
Mental / Psychological (cognitive)
  • Lengthened attention span
  • Developing ability to focus and stay on task
  • More understanding of time and space relations
  • Ability to sequence thought and actions; begin to think in advance of the ball…ANTICIPATE
  • Ability to remember, follow more complex instructions and solve higher-level problems (i.e. simple combination play)
physical psychomotor1
Physical (psychomotor)
  • Gain a tremendous amount of physical strength, endurance and power; this is related to body size and muscle mass
  • Motor performance includes a variety of motor tasks that require speed, balance, flexibility, explosive strength and muscular endurance; pace factor is developing quite well
  • Gross and small fine motor skills becoming refined
  • Children this age are in a linear growth mode (head to toe)
  • Height can approach 5 feet and weight can approach 80 pounds
socially psychosocial1
Socially (psychosocial)
  • Self-concept and body image are important
  • Less Sensitive…but still dislike personal failure in front of peers
  • Begin to initiate play on their own…they want to play
  • Becoming more serious about their play
  • Inclined more toward small group and team activities
  • Peer group attachment and pressure becoming significant
  • Adults outside the family become influential (coach, teacher, etc.)
  • Gender differences becoming more apparent
techniques skills1
Techniques (skills)
  • Running with the ball
    • At speed
    • Under Pressure Receiving
  • Passing
    • With outside of the foot
    • Heading
  • Instep Drive
    • Shooting
    • Crossing
  • Receiving Ground Balls with the Inside and Outside of Foot
    • Away from pressure
    • Past opponent
  • Receiving Air Balls
    • With the Instep (cushion) and sole, inside and outside of the foot (wedge)
  • Throw-In
    • Short and long distances
  • Moves in Dribbling
    • Half-turns
    • Step-overs
  • Introduce Heading
    • Proper technique for safety
    • Juggling (alone and in small groups)
    • Feet in contact with the ground
  • Tackling
    • Balance foot and contact foot (block tackle)
goalkeeping skills
Goalkeeping (skills)
  • Ready Stance for Goalkeepers
    • Foot positioning
    • Body posture
  • “W” Grip
    • Positioning of thumbs
    • Fingers spread
  • How to Hold a Ball After a Save
    • Ball to chest
    • Forearm protection
  • Catching Shots at the Keeper
    • Body alignment path of ball
  • Distribution
    • Throwing
      • Bowling
      • Over-arm
    • Goal Kicks
      • Distance and accuracy
    • Rolling
psychology mental and social1
Psychology (mental and social)
  • Working in groups of 3-6
  • Staying focused for one entire half
  • Sensitivity; learning how to win, lose or draw gracefully
  • Sportsmanship
  • How to handle parental involvement
  • Communication; emotional management
physical
physical
  • Endurance
  • Range of motion-flexibility
  • Proper warm-up is now mandatory
  • Introduce cool-down
tactics decisions1
Tactics (decisions)
  • Roles of 1st attacker and defender
  • Roles of 2nd attackers and defenders
  • 2v1 attacking (simple combinations)
  • Man-to-man defending
  • Throw-ins to teammate’s feet
  • Introduction to the tactics of set plays/restarts (goal kicks, corner kicks, other free kicks)
  • Introduction to setting up walls
rules
RULES
  • FOULS & MISCONDUCT
u10 objectives goals
U10 OBJECTIVES & GOALS

U9 PLAYERS

U10 PLAYERS

SCRIMMAGE:

Efficiently occupy the spaces on the field.

TACTICAL:

Creating space to receive the ball and keep possession

TECHNICAL:

Improve individual and collective basic soccer techniques

PHYSICAL:

Develop speed, coordination and balance with and without the ball

PSYCHOSOCIAL:

Positive interaction with teammates during the game

SCRIMMAGE:

Efficiently occupy space in relation to the ball and to teammates

TACTICAL:

Creating space and applying basic principles

TECHNICAL:

Accuracy in individual soccer techniques

PHYSICAL:

Develop speed, agility, coordination and balance

PSYCHOSOCIAL:

Interact positively and feel confident within the group

by the end of the season the u10 player must be capable of
BY THE END OF THE SEASON THE U10 PLAYER MUST BE CAPABLE OF:

U9 PLAYERS

U10 PLAYERS

Basic skills in 1v1 situations.

Balance in relation to the ball (forward, backwards and side to side)

Basic coordinated movements with and without the ball

Being efficient in 1v1 situations

Application of basic attacking principles

Coordinated movements at speed

slide95
U8 & U10

SEASON INFORMATION AND ORGANIZATION

2014 season information
2014 season information
  • SEASON DATES: MAY 5TH- JULY 23RD
    • No games or training on Memorial Day, July 2nd and July 3rd
    • Kick-Off Week
      • Boys: May 5th & May 7th
      • Girls: May 6th & May 8th
  • DAYS OF PLAY
    • Boys: Monday and Wednesday
    • Girls: Tuesday and Thursday
  • START TIMES
    • 5:30, 6:45 or 7:00
    • These times are randomly assigned by our scheduling system but may be altered (ie all 6:45 starts) to accommodate the coach's scheduling needs.
u10 s only
U10’S ONLY
  • U10 Teams will participate in the East Central Jamboree
      • DATE: Saturday July 12th
      • LOCATION: USA Soccer complex in Appleton
  • Each team will be scheduled for 2 games
  • Participation awards
  • Exposure to other clubs and teams
season format
season format
  • 2 sessions per week
    • May 5-27 training sessions (off Memorial Day)
    • May 28- 29 games
    • June- Mon & Tue’s- Training
    • June- Wed & Thu’s- Games
    • July –All games
  • Teams will train in “pairs” of teams
    • Teams within the pairs should be mixed together for training
  • Training plans will be provided
    • All teams will do the same training session
rosters schedules
ROSTERS & schedules
  • TEAM ROSTERS
    • Will be emailed to coaches no later than April 30th
  • TEAM SCHEDULES
    • Will be emailed to coaches no later than April 30th
training preparation
training PREPARATION
  • Review your plan (and your back up plan)
    • Know what equipment you need
    • Make notes about variations, progressions and guided discovery questions
    • Check with DCD if you have questions about the plan
  • At the field
    • Ensure the equipment you need is available
    • Set-up before players arrive if possible
    • Check the field & equipment for safety
    • Clear of debris
    • Goals anchored & nets secured
    • Make sure balls are properly inflated
training game attire
TRAINING & game ATTIRE
  • PLAYERS
    • Team Shirt (once received)
    • Athletic shorts or pants- no buttons, snaps, zippers or pockets
    • Shin guards
    • Soccer socks completely covering the shin guard
    • Soccer cleats or tennis shoes- no baseball or football
    • No jewelry
  • COACHES
    • Team Shirt (once received)
    • Athletic shorts/ pants
parent management
PARENT MANAGEMENT
  • Parents should
      • Sit on the opposite side of the field from the team
      • Sit behind the spectator lines or at least 5 ft off the touchline
      • Clean up field and surrounding area before and after game/training
      • Keep siblings and pets off the field
during the session
DURING THE SESSION
  • Keep them busy-down time is the enemy
  • Make adjustments to activities as necessary
  • Utilize your toolbox- Guided Discovery and Slanty Line
  • Enlist the parents help if needed with the session
  • Allow players to help to set-up/pick-up
  • Follow the plan- scrimmage is the dessert not the entree
  • NO LINES, NO LAPS, NO LECTURES
what is the difference between an activity and a drill
What is the difference between an activity AND a drill ?

Drills

  • A to B to C
  • Boring
  • Not realistic
  • Lack competition
  • Static
  • Do not allow for differentiation
  • Often include standing in lines

Activities

  • Reality (game) based
  • FUN
  • Competitive
  • Allow for decisions!!
  • Allow for creativity
  • 100% participation
  • Age appropriate
  • Differentiation- Slanty Line theory
slide110
GAME DAY RESTART GUIDE

GAME DAY ROSTER MANAGEMENT

parents
PARENTS
  • PARENTS SHOULD
    • Sit on the opposite side of the field from the team
    • Sit behind the spectator lines or at least 5 ft off the touchline
    • Clean up field and surrounding area before and after game
    • Keep siblings and pets off the field
    • Not enter the field without coach/referee permission
    • CHEER! (NOT COACH)
      • For effort- For attempts- For everyone
    • FOCUS ON FUN
      • After a game…”did you have FUN?”
      • “I love to watch you play!”
preparation
Preparation
  • Plan a 5-8 minute warm-up activity (U6)
  • Pre-plan player rotations

SAFETY

  • Check the field for safety
    • Clear of debris
    • Goals are anchored& Nets are secure
  • Ensure players are wearing required equipment
    • No jewelry (except medical)
    • Socks over shin-guards
    • Soccer cleats or safe athletic shoes
  • During the game ensure you, your team and your teams equipment are at least 5 ft back from the touchline
coach sideline behavior
COACH SIDELINE BEHAVIOR
  • Demonstrate good sportsmanship
  • Maintain a calm relaxed demeanor

DURING THE GAME

  • Limit coaching! This is the players game
  • Accept mistakes-they are necessary to their learning process
  • Try not to react negatively- physically or verbally
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4qVgMFrAYpc&list=PLWrJzdUX9i5yy72wH2UwAN2mMqmDAxjNW&index=3
  • Limit substitutions
    • Allow players enough time to get into the flow of THEIR game
  • Ensure appropriate playing time & positional rotations
after the game
after the game
  • Shake hands with the other team
  • Thank the official(s)
  • No postmortem for players or parents
    • Let them go home and address any issues at the next training session
  • Make sure all players have been picked up
    • Wait with those who haven’t-Times Two Policy
  • Ensure field and sideline area are clean
  • Report any field or equipment issues to your Commissioner or Division Coaching Director
  • Ensure field and sideline area are clean
club website overview
Club Website overview

http://www.unitedhurricanes.com

  • Become a member
  • Location of information
    • Policies
    • Contacts
      • Key contacts
    • Recreational Coach’s Page
    • Team Site Option
slide117
THANK YOU FOR YOUR COMMITMENT TO THE PLAYERS AND THE SPORT. OUR CLUB COULD NOT OPERATE WITHOUT THE GENEROUS HELP OF VOLUNTEERS LIKE YOU.

SEE YOU ON THE PITCH!

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