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PLACEMENT & COLLEGE READINESS: SURVEYING THE LANDSCAPE. Bill Moore Policy Associate, SBCTC Director, Re-Thinking Precollege Math Project bmoore@sbctc.edu 360-704-4346. SESSION OUTLINE. Role/purpose of placement testing G eneral issues & definitions (including attributes, affective domain)

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placement college readiness surveying the landscape

PLACEMENT & COLLEGE READINESS: SURVEYING THE LANDSCAPE

Bill Moore

Policy Associate, SBCTC

Director, Re-Thinking Precollege Math Project

bmoore@sbctc.edu

360-704-4346

session outline
SESSION OUTLINE
  • Role/purpose of placement testing
  • General issues & definitions (including attributes, affective domain)
  • Studies and other resources
  • Testing approaches & alternatives (including diagnostics)
  • Ideas for Criteria/Principles?
questions to consider
QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER
  • What do you see as the main functions of placement tests for colleges?
  • How well do you think students understand what’s involved in college placement testing (and what’s on the tests)?
placement testing in a seamless educational system
PLACEMENT TESTING IN A “SEAMLESS” EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM

Historical Role

Sorting students appropriately into postsecondary courses

Defining “college readiness” to various stakeholders, especially K-12 system

New Role in

K-20 System

session outline1
SESSION OUTLINE
  • Role/purpose of placement testing
  • General issues & definitions (including attributes, affective domain)
  • Studies and other resources
  • Testing approaches & alternatives (including diagnostics)
  • Ideas for Criteria/Principles?
redefining college readiness
REDEFINING COLLEGE READINESS

David Conley, prepared for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, 2007

slide10

Fixed Mindset

Growth Mindset

UT Dana Center Academic Youth Development program

Student Attributes for Math Success (SAMS) Project

As a result, they may plateau early and achieve less than their full potential.

As a result, they reach ever-higher levels of achievement

another approach to attributes
Another Approach to Attributes

Student Readiness Inventory, ACT

session outline2
SESSION OUTLINE
  • Role/purpose of placement testing
  • General issues & definitions (including attributes, affective domain)
  • Studies and other resources
  • Testing approaches & alternatives (including diagnostics)
  • Ideas for Criteria/Principles?
assessment findings ccrc study
Assessment Findings, CCRC Study
  • Confusion about what it means to be “college ready”—no obvious cutoff point
  • Tests may be reasonable predictors of college-level success, but less effective at identifying who is likely to benefit from interventions
  • Assessments do not provide adequate diagnostic information
  • A single cutoff point exaggerates the distinction between developmental and college ready—need for multiple measures including non-cognitive
  • Students are confused about the process and not well advised (Venezia, Bracco, & Nodine, 2010)

CCRC, Hughes & Scott-Clayton, 2010)

mdrc study of placement testing practices
MDRC study of placement testing practices

ISSUES/FINDINGS

  • Students take tests without full understanding of purpose, significance
  • Colleges rely solely on single standardized test
  • Offer little or no information relevant to faculty, instruction
  • Little ongoing deliberation around placement choices, issues

QUESTIONS

  • Balancing efficiency with accuracy, relevance?
  • Role of multiple measures (transcripts, affective, work samples, …)?
  • Strengthen connections between placement, instruction, progress?
  • Data collection for ongoing review, deliberation re tests?
various relevant resources studies
Various Relevant Resources/Studies
  • California Resources and Projects
    • Research and Planning Group for California CCs
    • Basic Skills Initiative
  • Achieving the Dream reports
    • “Standardization vs. Flexibility”
    • “It’s Not about the Cut Score…”
  • National Center for Postsecondary Research (Community College Research Center)
  • MDRC Research
  • ACT
  • Developmental Education Initiative
session outline3
SESSION OUTLINE
  • Role/purpose of placement testing
  • General issues & definitions (including attributes, affective domain)
  • Studies and other resources
  • Testing approaches & alternatives (including diagnostics)
  • Ideas for Criteria/Principles?
math placement testing options
Math Placement TestingOptions
  • MyMathTest
  • MAA/Maplesoft Placement Test Suite
  • Academic Placement Testing Program(MPT, CRMT)
  • Carnegie Learning Cognitive Tutor
  • Assessment and Learning in Knowledge Spaces (ALEKS)
concept test example
Concept Test Example

A jogger runs away from campus at a steady rate, stops to talk to some friends, runs away from campus for a little longer, and then returns to campus. Which graph below could show the jogger’s distance as a function of time?

customized state approaches
Customized State Approaches

http://www.calstate.edu/eap/

california mathematics diagnostic testing project

CLASS RESULTS

School Instructor Course Test Date Test Type

AR50/90

Number of Students: 25

Topic No. of Mastery Class Average Students at

Code Items Level Score Percent Mastery

DECM 9 6 4.6 51% 6 24%

EQTN 6 4 3.2 53% 11 44%

EXPS 5 3 2.7 54% 12 48%

FRAC 9 6 4.2 47% 4 16%

GEOM 10 7 5.0 50% 7 28%

INTG 11 8 7.0 64% 12 48%

---- ---- ------

Total 50 26.7 53%

CALIFORNIA MATHEMATICS DIAGNOSTIC TESTING PROJECT
slide27

From the Acceleration Initiative (3CSN.org)

(Katie Hern, Chabot College)

  • Recommendations include:
  • Reconsider assumption that placement score = # of terms remediation
  • Consider using placement scores to identify students needing extra support in accelerated model rather than tracking into longer sequence
session outline4
SESSION OUTLINE
  • Role/purpose of placement testing
  • General issues & definitions (including attributes, affective domain)
  • Studies and other resources
  • Testing approaches & alternatives (including diagnostics)
  • Ideas for Criteria/Principles?
organizing principles for assessment
Organizing Principles for Assessment
  • Coherence

The system aligns curriculum, instruction, and assessment around the key learning goals spelled out in the standards for college and career readiness.

  • Comprehensiveness

The system consists of a toolbox of assessments that meet a variety of different purposes and that provide various users with information they need to make decisions.

  • Accuracy and Credibility

The information from assessments supports valid inferences about student progress toward college and career readiness, as well as actionable information for multiple users.

  • Fairness

The assessments enable all students to demonstrate what they know and are able to do.

Robert Rothman

Alliance for Excellent Education Policy Brief, 2010

assessment for placement writing
Assessment for Placement (Writing):
  • Placement criteria should be clearly connected to any differences in the available courses. If scoring systems are used, scores should derive from criteria that grow out of the work of the courses into which students are being placed.
  • Decision-makers should carefully weigh the educational costs and benefits of various approaches (timed tests, portfolios, directed self placement, etc.) recognizing that the method chosen implicitly influences what students come to believe about writing.
  • Students should have the right to weigh in on their assessment through directed self-placement, either alone or in combination with other methods.
  • If for financial or even programmatic reasons the initial method of placement is somewhat reductive, instructors of record should create an opportunity early in the semester to review and change students’ placement assignments, and uniform procedures should be established to facilitate the easy re-placement of improperly placed students.
  • Placement processes should be continually assessed and revised in accord with course content, overall program goals, shifts in the abilities of the student population, and empirical evidence.

Adapted from Conference on College Composition and Communication (4Cs)

position statement