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  1. Bio 9C: Monday, 10.18.10Title: Introduction to Nutrition and Digestion • Homework: • Read pgs. 44-45. Answer the questions on the back of Assignment sheet in your notebooks! • Do Now: • Which types of foods have Carbohydrates? Proteins? Lipids/ Fats? • Today’s Objectives: • Identify one key function of each macronutrient in food (carbohydrate, lipid, and protein) • Identify examples of foods that contain carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins.

  2. Agenda What’s in the hamburger? – paired activity Overview of Mega-Unit Design a meal posters – Day 1

  3. What’s in this hamburger? • In PAIRS, determine: • What are the sources of carbohydrates? • What are the sources of lipids (fats)? • What are the sources of proteins? • List any ingredients for which you’re not sure which category (carbs, lipids, proteins) they go into. • Objectives for Class: • Given an example of a food, identify the sources of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. • Identify examples of foods that contain carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins.

  4. Identifying the Carbon Compounds in this Hamburger Lettuce and Tomato = Carbohydrate (Fiber) Ketchup = Mostly Carbohydrate (simple sugar from Corn Syrup) Hamburger Meat = Lipids and Proteins Cheese = Mostly Proteins and Lipids Bun = Carbohydrate (Complex Carb from Starch) • Objectives for Class: • Given an example of a food, identify the sources of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. • Identify examples of foods that contain carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins.

  5. Agenda What’s in the hamburger? – paired activity Overview of Mega-Unit Design a meal posters – Day 1

  6. The next Month (or so) at a Glance: Biochemistry, The Power of Enzymes, and Digestion We will be answering these questions: • What’s in this Hamburger? • How do we get the stuff that’s in it, out? • What happens to this stuff as we get it out? • Why do we need this stuff? By the end of this unit, you should be able to… • Explain why we need carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins • Explain how we extract these nutrients from food • Explain how an enzyme’s structure fits its function • Explain how structures in the digestive system fit their function • Explain why enzymes are essential to digestion • Exhibit basic lab safety skills in the McMush & Enzyme Labs • Objectives for Class: • Given an example of a food, identify the sources of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. • Identify examples of foods that contain carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins.

  7. Agenda What’s in the hamburger? – paired activity Overview of Mega-Unit Design a meal posters – Day 1

  8. Design A Meal Which foods have which carbon compounds? • Part I: • In the food/meal that you thought of for homework… • What are the sources of carbohydrates? • What are the sources of lipids (fats)? • What are the sources of proteins? • List any ingredients for which you’re not sure which category (carbs, lipids, proteins) they go in • Objectives for Class: • Given an example of a food, identify the sources of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. • Identify examples of foods that contain carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins.

  9. Design A Meal • Part II: • Compare your meal with the person sitting next to you. Do you have the carbon compounds labeled properly? • Part III: • Draw a picture of your meal on a larger piece of paper • Label the Carbon Compounds on the picture • Under each Label • List the things these individual compounds do for our bodies • List at least Two Major Characteristics of each compound • Objectives for Class: • Given an example of a food, identify the sources of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. • Identify examples of foods that contain carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins.

  10. Bio 9C: Thursday, 10.21.10Title: Introduction to Carbon Compounds • Homework: • Use Effective Reading Strategies to Read pgs. 46-48. PAY CLOSEST ATTENTION TO PROTEINS AND LIPIDS! Put effective reading notes in your Notebook! • Do Now: • On the next slide… (I will advance this slide at 3 min. so you can do the Do Now, so you have 2 min to copy the title, date, and homework) • Today’s Objectives: • Identify the 6 key elements found in living things • Explain how monomers and polymers relate to each other • Identify examples of foods that contain carbohydrates and proteins • Identify two key functions of carbohydrates and proteins in food

  11. Carbon Compounds:The Molecules of Living Things Do Now: • Look at the pictures below. Why do you think these are called CARBON compounds? Write some reasons in your notebook.

  12. Bio 9C: Thursday, 10.21.10Title: Introduction to Carbon Compounds • Today’s Objectives: • Identify the 6 key elements found in living things • Explain how monomers and polymers relate to each other

  13. Today’s Agenda: Thinking about the scale of atoms Introduction to Carbon Compounds Direct Vocabulary Activity: Monomers vs. Polymers Structures and Functions of Carbohydrates Carbohydrate food poster work Structures and Functions of Proteins Protein food poster work

  14. Let’s get a sense of scale: How Do Molecules & Atoms Relate to Cells? Zoom In

  15. Zoom in… A Single Organelle (chloroplast) in the Cell PLANT CELLS Atoms come together to make up molecules Zoom in a lot more… A Single Molecule inside the Organelle (chlorophyll) What elements do you see in the atoms that make up this molecule?

  16. Today’s Agenda: Thinking about the scale of atoms Introduction to Carbon Compounds Direct Vocabulary Activity: Monomers vs. Polymers Structures and Functions of Carbohydrates Carbohydrate food poster work Structures and Functions of Proteins Protein food poster work

  17. Six Common Elements in Living Things: • Carbon (C) • Hydrogen (H) • Nitrogen (N) • Oxygen (O) • Phosphorus (P) • Sulfur (S) CHNOPS All of the molecules we will look at are Carbon - based • Objectives for Class: • Identify the 6 key elements found in living things • Explain how monomers and polymers relate to each other

  18. Carbon:The “Swiss Army Knife” Element of Life More versatile than any other element! • Can bond with itself and many other elements • Forms millions of large molecules Monomer • A single, building-block molecule • All of the carbon compounds are based on carbon Polymer (a.k.a. Macromolecule) • “Many monomers” • A long chain of monomers bonded together to form one huge molecule • Objectives for Class: • Identify the 6 key elements found in living things • Explain how monomers and polymers relate to each other

  19. Today’s Agenda: Thinking about the scale of atoms Introduction to Carbon Compounds Direct Vocabulary Activity: Monomers vs. Polymers Structures and Functions of Carbohydrates Carbohydrate food poster work Structures and Functions of Proteins Protein food poster work

  20. Monomers and Polymers: In Our Own Words • As you have read and as we have just learned, polymers are made of monomers (or monomers make up polymers… however you want to think of it). • This is sort of an easy concept, but often hard to understand when we start talking about chemical compounds. • SO…. Put this into your own words… • Objectives for Class: • Identify the 6 key elements found in living things • Explain how monomers and polymers relate to each other

  21. Monomers and Polymers: In Our Own Words • Your Task: • Work with your partner from yesterday’s Hamburger activity to describe how monomers and polymers relate to each other (12 min). • (remember, this is a “part/ whole” relationship where monomers are part of the wholepolymer) • You can express this as: • A Written analogy w/ a picture • (i.e.: monomers and polymers are like _______ and _______, because _________) Or… • A rap/ song/ poem describing how monomers relate to polymers • Objectives for Class: • Identify the 6 key elements found in living things • Explain how monomers and polymers relate to each other

  22. Today’s Agenda: Thinking about the scale of atoms Introduction to Carbon Compounds Direct Vocabulary Activity: Monomers vs. Polymers Structures and Functions of Carbohydrates Carbohydrate food poster work Structures and Functions of Proteins Protein food poster work

  23. 4 Types of Carbon-Based Compounds: Carbon combines with Hydrogen, Nitrogen,Oxygen, Phosphorus, and Sulfur to form these 4 Compounds: • Carbohydrates • Lipids • Proteins • Nucleic Acids Each type is made of monomers that connect to form polymers. IMPORTANT NOTE: Each type is separate – not made of each other! Lipids are not made of carbs!] • Objectives for Class: • Identify the 6 key elements found in living things • Explain how monomers and polymers relate to each other • Identify examples of foods that contain carbohydrates • Identify two key functions of carbohydrates in food

  24. Carbohydrates contain C-H2O Simple sugars • Monosaccharide = onesugar Ex: glucose, fructose • Disaccharide = doublesugar Ex: sucrose, lactose, maltose • Used as an immediate energy source (for cell respiration to make ATP) Foods: sugar, fruit, candy, juice, soda • Objectives for Class: • Identify the 6 key elements found in living things • Explain how monomers and polymers relate to each other • Identify examples of foods that contain carbohydrates • Identify two key functions of carbohydrates in food

  25. More Carbohydrates Complex sugars • Polysaccharide = manysugars • Can be used for: • Long-term energy storage Ex: Starch Foods: grains, root vegetables (bread, pasta, cereal, rice, corn, potatoes) • Structural support Ex: cellulose (plant cell walls) (aka “fiber”) Foods: fruits, vegetables, whole grains (lettuce, celery, whole wheat) • Objectives for Class: • Identify the 6 key elements found in living things • Explain how monomers and polymers relate to each other • Identify examples of foods that contain carbohydrates • Identify two key functions of carbohydrates in food

  26. Today’s Agenda: Thinking about the scale of atoms Introduction to Carbon Compounds Direct Vocabulary Activity: Monomers vs. Polymers Structures and Functions of Carbohydrates Carbohydrate food poster work Structures and Functions of Proteins Protein food poster work

  27. Design A Meal - Carbohydrates What foods have these compounds? • Part I: Do Now • In the food/meal that you thought of for homework… • What are the sources of carbohydrates? • What are the sources of lipids (fats)? • What are the sources of proteins? • List any ingredients for which you’re not sure which category (carbs, lipids, proteins) they go in • Part II: • Compare your meal with the person sitting next to you. Do you have the carbon compounds labeled properly? • Part III: • Draw a picture of your meal on a larger piece of paper • Label the Carbon Compounds on the picture • Under the CarbohydrateLabels: • Follow the rubric • Objectives for Class: • Given an example of a food, identify the sources of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. • Identify examples of foods that contain carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins.

  28. Bio 9C: Friday, 10.22.10Title: Introduction to Carbon Compounds • Homework: • No Homework  • Do Now: • What are proteins used for? • Today’s Objectives: • Identify examples of foods that contain carbohydrates, proteins and lipids • Identify two key functions of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids in food

  29. Today’s Agenda: Structures and Functions of Proteins Structure and Functions of Lipids Food poster work, Carbohydrate, Protein and Lipids

  30. What Foods Contain Proteins? • Most animal products such as • Meat & fish • Eggs • Milk, yogurt, cheese • Beans and nuts(especially when eaten in combination with complex carbs) • Objectives for Class: • Identify examples of foods that contain proteins • Identify two key functions of proteins • Describe the monomers and polymers of proteins

  31. Proteins contain C, H, O, N and some S Have thousands of different uses! Proteins can be… • Enzymes (control chemical reactions) • Hormones (ex: insulin) • Transporters • in cell membranes • in blood cells (hemoglobin) • Body structures (hair, muscle, skin, bone) • Immune system (fight diseases) • Objectives for Class: • Identify examples of foods that contain proteins • Identify two key functions of proteins • Describe the monomers and polymers of proteins

  32. How can there be so many Different Proteins? Proteins are made of: • Amino acids (monomers) • There are 20 different amino acids (different R’s) • Thousands of A.A.’s connect in any possible order to form long chains  this makes thousands of different possible proteins • Objectives for Class: • Identify examples of foods that contain proteins • Identify two key functions of proteins • Describe the monomers and polymers of proteins

  33. Today’s Agenda: Structures and Functions of Proteins Structure and Functions of Lipids Food poster work, Carbohydrate, Protein and Lipids

  34. Lipids contain mostly C and H • Examples: • Fats, oils, cholesterol, waxes • Characteristics: • Made of fatty acids and glycerol • Do not dissolve in water (repel water) • How It’s Used: • Long-term ENERGY storage • Cell membranes • Waterproofing • Steroid hormones Foods: Oils (from nuts, seeds, fish, cheese, meat), butter, lard. Mad carbons = Mad Energy (aka – mad calories) Note: The structure of the Fatty Acid determines the type of Fat (i.e.: saturated vs. unsaturated) • Objectives for Class: • Identify examples of foods that contain lipids • Identify two key functions of lipids • Describe the monomers and polymers of lipids

  35. Today’s Agenda: Structures and Functions of Proteins Structure and Functions of Lipids Food poster work, Carbohydrate, Protein and Lipids

  36. Design A Meal – Carbs, Protein, Lipids What foods have these compounds? • Part I: Do Now • In the food/meal that you thought of for homework… • What are the sources of carbohydrates? • What are the sources of lipids (fats)? • What are the sources of proteins? • List any ingredients for which you’re not sure which category (carbs, lipids, proteins) they go in • Part II: • Compare your meal with the person sitting next to you. Do you have the carbon compounds labeled properly? • Part III: • Draw a picture of your meal on a larger piece of paper • Label the Carbon Compounds on the picture • Complete the tasks for the Carbohydrate, Protein and LipidLabels: • Follow the rubric • Objectives for Class: • Given an example of a food, identify the sources of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. • Identify examples of foods that contain carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins.

  37. Bio 9C: Monday, 10.25.10Title: Reviewing Carbon Compounds Set the cool timer to 4 min and press start when the bell rings. Remember, it is SILENT during the Do Now! Homework: • Complete your food posters according to the rubric • Do Now: • List all of the food you have eaten in the past 24-hrs. • Of this food, what are the carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids? • Today’s Objectives: • Identify examples of foods that contain carbohydrates, proteins and lipids • Identify two key functions of carbohydrates and proteins in food

  38. Reviewing Carbon Compounds Today’s Plan: • Complete the “Carbon Compounds Review Packet” • For help, you can use: • Your notes • Books – These can be borrowed from the cabinet. Marcus and Christine, please help distribute these. • The guide at the back of the packet. • This is an INDIVIDUAL assignment (I know the assignment sheet says you can work in pairs, but I would rather you work INDIVIDUALLY). • Also, I know we haven’t reviewed nucleic acids as a whole class, but you should be able to complete the packet using your other resources. • When completed: • Put all books back in the cabinet • Continue work on your food posters.

  39. Bio 9C: Tuesday, 10.26.10Title: Making Data Tables Pre-Assessment • Homework: • No Homework  • Do Now: • Have you made a data table for a lab before? If so, what were the circumstances and how did you do it? • Today’s Objectives: • Practice making tables to record data from a lab.

  40. Today’s Agenda: Data Tables Pre-Assessment Review Nucleic Acids Poster Gallery Walk

  41. Lab Skills Pre-Assessment: Making Data Tables Overview: • One important skill in designing and conducting lab experiments is to create a data table that serves as an organized way to collect the data from your experiment. Purpose: • To practice making data tables that are both organized and appropriate for a given experiment. • This is important preparation for our McMush lab at the end of this week, and will give your biology teachers valuable feedback about how well you are able to accomplish this task on your own. Instructions: • Read each experiment description, then draw a data table in the space provided.

  42. Today’s Agenda: Data Tables Pre-Assessment Review Nucleic Acids Poster Gallery Walk

  43. Nucleic Acids contain C, H, O, N and P • Used to store and transmit genetic instructions for making proteins • DNA (stores genetic info) • RNA (carries genetic info to ribosomes) Made of: • Nucleotides (monomers) • Connected together into long chains (helix) • Objectives for Class: • Show what you know about cell respiration on the quiz. • Identify one key function of each macronutrient in food (carbohydrate, lipid, and protein) • Identify examples of foods that contain carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins.

  44. Today’s Agenda: Data Tables Pre-Assessment Review Nucleic Acids Poster Gallery Walk

  45. Food Poster Gallery Walk • Post the food posters around the room • Everyone begin at a different poster • Use your post-it notes to write 1-piece of constructive feedback regarding the poster and stick it to the poster • Rotate CLOCKWISE to the next poster • Repeat step 3 • Rotate CLOCKWISE to the next poster • Objectives for Class: • Identify one key function of each macronutrient in food (carbohydrate, lipid, and protein) • Identify examples of foods that contain carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins.

  46. Bio 9C: Wednesday, 10.27.09Title: The McMush Lab • Homework: • One paragraph in notebook: • What’s the purpose of the McMush Lab? • What will we do in Part I? Why? • What will we do in Part II? Why? • Do Now: • Reviewing Concepts: • What are the monomers of carbohydrates? • What are the monomers of proteins? • What are the monomers of lipids? • What are the monomers of nucleic acids? • Today’s Objectives: • Prepare for lab by reviewing safety guidelines and lab procedures • Predict which carbon compounds are in a Happy Meal with justification

  47. McSeating Chart Carla Christine Amanjot Jhon Julian Anthony Joe Amando Garlyn Obayanna Jamesly Marie Brunyr Jason Asarel Jonathan Lilliana Kendra Crystal Karen Marcus Rockens Aaron

  48. McPre-Lab • Sit with your lab partner • Individually: • Actively Read the Introduction and Procedure sections of the lab (underline key points, annotate in the margins, etc.) • Note: the Procedure has 3 sections • This should take about 15 min. • With your partner: • Answer the pre-lab questions (20 min) • These can not be answered by pulling direct sentences from the lab… they require some thinking. • Whole class: • Reviewing Part I and Part II (10 min)

  49. Bio 9C: Thursday, 10.28.10Title: The McMush Lab Double Block • Homework: McMush Lab Lab Write up – See back of packet. Due Tuesday, 11.2.10. You will have TOMORROW to work on the writing the paper in class – bring your files on a flashdrive! • Do Now: • How does Part I connect to Part II of this lab? • Today’s Objectives: • Follow lab safety guidelines and lab procedures • Predict which carbon compounds are in a Happy Meal • Use chemical indicators to test the compounds in a Happy Meal

  50. The World Famous McMush Lab… Important Terms and Concepts • What are chemical Indicators? • Chemicals that indicate the presence of a certain substance by changing color when they are in contact with that substance. • A change in color = Positive Result (the substance is there) • NO change in color = Negative Result(the substance is NOT there) • 3 Chemical Indicators in this Lab: • Benedicts Solution: Changes color when it comes in contact with a Monosaccharide likeGlucose • Iodine:Changes color when it comes in contact with a Polysaccharide like Starch • Buiret Solution: Changes color when it comes in contact with a Protein • Negative Control = Water • The variable that is the same for all test trials. It is guaranteed to give a Negative Result • Why use water?