physics 121 electricity and magnetism lecture 05 electric potential y f chapter 23 sect 1 5 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Electric Potential Energy versus Electric Potential Calculating the Potential from the Field PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Electric Potential Energy versus Electric Potential Calculating the Potential from the Field

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 28

Electric Potential Energy versus Electric Potential Calculating the Potential from the Field - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 228 Views
  • Uploaded on

Physics 121 - Electricity and Magnetism Lecture 05 -Electric Potential Y&F Chapter 23 Sect. 1-5. Electric Potential Energy versus Electric Potential Calculating the Potential from the Field Potential due to a Point Charge Equipotential Surfaces Calculating the Field from the Potential

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Electric Potential Energy versus Electric Potential Calculating the Potential from the Field' - farrah


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
physics 121 electricity and magnetism lecture 05 electric potential y f chapter 23 sect 1 5
Physics 121 - Electricity and Magnetism Lecture 05 -Electric Potential Y&F Chapter 23 Sect. 1-5
  • Electric Potential Energy versus Electric Potential
  • Calculating the Potential from the Field
  • Potential due to a Point Charge
  • Equipotential Surfaces
  • Calculating the Field from the Potential
  • Potentials on, within, and near Conductors
  • Potential due to a Group of Point Charges
  • Potential due to a Continuous Charge Distribution
  • Summary
slide2

Initially

Q10= 10 C

r1= 10 cm

Q20= 0 C

r2= 20 cm

Mechanical analogy: Water pressure

Open valve, water flows

What determines final water levels?

gy = PE/unit mass

P2 = rgy2

P1 = rgy1

X

Electrostatics: Two spheres, different radii, one with charge

Connect wire between spheres,

then disconnect it

Q1f= ??

Q2f= ??

wire

  • Are final charges equal?
  • What determines how charge

redistributes itself?

electric potential
ELECTRIC POTENTIAL

Potential Energy due to an electric field

per unit (test) charge

  • Closely related to Electrostatic Potential Energy……but……
  • DPE: ~ work done ( = force x displacement)
  • DV: ~ work done/unit charge ( = field x displacement)
  • Potential summarizes effect of charge on a distant point without specifying

a test charge there (Like field, unlike PE)

  • Scalar field  Easier to use than E (vector)
  • Both DPE and DV imply a reference level
  • Both PE and V are conservative forces/fields, like gravity
  • Can determine motion of charged particles using:

Second Law, F = qE

or PE, Work-KE theorem &/or mechanical energy conservation

Units, Dimensions:

  • Potential Energy U: Joules
  • PotentialV: [U]/[q] Joules/C. = VOLTS
  • Synonyms for V: both [F][d]/[q], and [q][E][d]/[q] = N.m / C.
  • Units of field are [V]/[d] = Volts / meter – same as N/C.
reminder work done by a constant force

Ds

I

II

III

IV

Reminder: Work Done by a Constant Force

5-1: In the four examples shown in the sketch, a force F acts on an object and does work. In all four cases, the force has the same magnitude and the displacement of the object is to the right and has the same magnitude.

Rank the cases in order of the work done by the force on the object, from most positive to the most negative.

  • I, IV, III, II
  • II, I, IV, III
  • III, II, IV, I
  • I, IV, II, III
  • III, IV, I, II
work done by a constant force a reminder

Dr

I

II

IV

If the force varies in direction and/or magnitude along the path:

III

Example of a “Path Integral”

Result may depend on path

Work Done by a Constant Force (a reminder)

The work DW done by a constantexternal force on it is the product of:

  • the magnitude F of the force
  • the magnitude Δs of the displacement

of the point of application of the force

  • and cos(θ), where θ is the angle

between force and displacement vectors:

slide6

Recall: Conservative Fields definition

  • Work done BY THE FIELD on a test charge moving

from i to f does notdepend on the path taken.

  • Work done around any closed path equals zero.

(basic definition)

POTENTIAL ENERGY DIFFERENCE:

Charge q0 moves from i to f along ANY path

POTENTIAL DIFFERENCE:

(from basic definition)

( Evaluate integrals

on ANYpath from

i to f )

Potential is potential energy per unit charge

Definitions: Electrostatic Potential Energy versus Potential

Path Integral

some distinctions and details
Some distinctions and details
  • Only differences in electric potential and PE are meaningful:
    • Relative reference: Choose arbitrary zero reference level for ΔU or ΔV.
    • Absolute reference: Set Ui = 0 with all charges infinitely far apart
    • Volt (V) = SI Unit of electric potential
    • 1 volt = 1 joule per coulomb = 1 J/C
    • 1 J = 1 VC and 1 J = 1 N m
  • Electric field units – new name:
    • 1 N/C = (1 N/C)(1 VC/1 Nm) = 1 V/m
  • A convenient energy unit: electron volt
    • 1 eV = work done moving charge e

through a 1 volt potential difference

= (1.60×10-19 C)(1 J/C) = 1.60×10-19 J

  • The field depends on a charge distribution elsewhere).
  • A test charge q0 moved between i and f gains or loses potential energy DU.
  • DU does not depend on path
  • DV also does not depend on path and also does not depend on |q0| (test charge).
  • Use Work-KE theorem to link potential differences to motion
work and pe who what does positive or negative work

f

i

E

Work and PE : Who/what does positive or negative work?

5-2: In the figure, suppose we exert a force and move the proton from point i to point f in a uniform electric field directed as shown. Which statement of the following is true?

A. Electric field does positive work on the proton.

Electric potential energy of the proton increases.

B. Electric field does negative work on the proton.

Electric potential energy of the proton decreases.

C. Our force does positive work on the proton.

Electric potential energy of the proton increases.

D. Our force does positive work on the proton.

Electric potential energy of the proton decreases.

E. The changes cannot be determined.

Hint: which directions pertain to displacement and force?

slide9

i

E

o

f

Dx

To convert potential to/from PE just multiply/divide by q0

EXAMPLE: CHOOSE A SIMPLE PATH THROUGH POINT “O”

Displacement i  o is normal to field (path along equipotential)

  • External agent must do positive work on positive test charge to move it from o  f

- units of E can be volts/meter

  • E field does negative work

EXAMPLE: Find change in potential as test charge +q0 moves from point i to f in a uniform field

DU and DV depend only on the endpoints

ANY PATH from i to f gives same results

uniform field

What are signs of DU and DV if test charge is negative?

slide10

Potential Function for a Point Charge

Find potential V(R) a distance R from a point charge q :

Positive for q > 0, Negative for q<0

Inversely proportional to r1 NOT r2

Similarly, for potential ENERGY: (use same method but integrate force)

Shared PE between q and Q

Overall sign depends on both signs

Charges are infinitely far apart  choose Vinfinity = 0 (reference level)

DU = work done on a test charge as it moves to final location

DU = q0DV

Field is conservative  choose most convenient path = radial

equi potential surfaces voltage and potential energy are constant i e d v 0 d u 0

and

DV= 0

Vi > Vf

DV= 0

Vfi

q

DV= 0

CONDUCTORS ARE ALWAYS EQUIPOTENTIALS - Charge on conductors moves to make Einside = 0 - Esurf is perpendicular to surface

so DV = 0 along any path on or in a conductor

Equi-potential surfaces:Voltage and potential energy are constant; i.e. DV=0, DU=0

No change in potential energy along an equi-potential

Zero work is done moving charges along an equi-potential

Electric field must be perpendicular to tangent of equipotential

Equipotentials are perpendicular to the electric field lines

E is the gradient

of V

examples of equipotential surfaces
Examples of equipotential surfaces

Point charge or

outside sphere of charge

Uniform Field

Dipole Field

Equipotentials

are planes

(evenly spaced)

Equipotentials

are spheres

(not evenly spaced)

Equipotentials

are not simple shapes

slide13

Gradient = spatial rate of change

q

EXAMPLE: UNIFORM FIELD E – 1 dimension

E

Ds

The field E(r) is the gradient of the potential

Component of ds on E produces potential change

Component of ds normal to E produces no change

Field is normal to equipotential surfaces

For path along equipotential, DV = 0

slide14

s+

s-

L

Dx

Vi

Vf

E = 0

Example:

Find the potential difference DV across the capacitor, assuming:

  • s = 1 nanoCoulomb/m2
  • Dx = 1 cm & points from negative to positive plate
  • Uniform field E

A positive test charge +q gains potential energy DU = qDV as it moves from - plate to + plate along any path (including external circuit)

Potential difference between oppositely charged conductors (parallel plate capacitor)

  • Equal and opposite surface charges
  • All charge resides on inner surfaces

(opposite charges attract)

comparison of point charge and mass formulas for vector and scalar fields

FIELD

FORCE

VECTORS

force/unit mass

(acceleration)

Gravitation

force/unit charge

(n/C)

Electrostatics

SCALARS

POTENTIAL ENERGY

POTENTIAL

PE/unit mass

(not used often)

Gravitation

Electrostatics

PE/unit charge

Fields and forces ~ 1/R2 but Potentials and PEs ~ 1/R1

Comparison of point charge and mass formulas for vector and scalar fields
slide17

r1= 10 cm

V10= 90,000 V.

Conductors come to same potential

Charge redistributes to make it so

wire

r2= 20 cm

V20= 0 V.

Initially:

Q20= 0 V.

Find the final charges:

Find the final potential(s):

Conductors are always equipotentials

Example: Two spheres, different radii, one charged to 90,000 V.

Connect wire between spheres – charge moves

slide18

Potential inside a hollow conducting shell

d

c

R

a

b

Potential is continuous across surface – field is not

V(r)

Vinside=Vsurf

E(r)

Voutside= kq / r

Eoutside= kq / r2

Einside=0

r

r

R

R

Vc = Vb (shell is an equipotential)

= 18,000 Volts on surface

R = 10 cm

Shell can be any closed surface (sphere or not)

Find potential Va at point “a” inside shell

Definition:

Apply Gauss’ Law: choose GS just inside shell:

potential due to a group of point charges

Reminder: For the electric field, by superposition, for n point charges

Potential due to a group of point charges
  • Use superposition for n point charges
  • The sum is an algebraic sum, not a vector sum.
  • E may be zero where V does not equal to zero.
  • V may be zero where E does not equal to zero.
slide20

Examples: potential due to point charges

TWO EQUAL CHARGES – Point P at the midpoint between them

+q

+q

+q

-q

P

P

d

F and E are zero at P but work would have

to be done to move a test charge to P from infinity.

Let q = 1 nC, d = 2 m:

DIPOLE – Otherwise positioned as above

d

Let q = 1 nC, d = 2 m:

Use Superposition

Note: E may be zero where V does not = 0

V may be zero where E does not = 0

slide21

Another example: square with charges on corners

Find E & V at center point P

a

-q

q

d

a

a

P

d

q

-q

a

+

Another example: same as above with all charges positive

-

Another example: find work done by 12 volt battery in 1 minute

as 1 ampere current flows to light lamp

i

E

electric field and electric potential

q

-q

q

q

A

B

q

q

q

-q

q

q

-q

q

q

-q

C

D

E

Electric Field and Electric Potential

5-3: Which of the following figures have V=0 and E=0 at the red point?

slide23

2. Find an expression for dq, the charge in a “small” chunk of the distribution, in terms of l, s, or r

Typical challenge: express above in terms of chosen coordinates

3. At point P, dV is the differential contribution to the potential due to a point-like chargedq located in the distribution. Use symmetry.

4. Use “superposition”. Add up (integrate) the contributions over the whole charge distribution, varying the displacement r as needed. Scalar VP.

5. Field E can be gotten from potential by taking the “gradient”:

Rate of potential change perpendicular to equipotential

Method for finding potential function V at a point P due to a continuous charge distribution

1. Assume V = 0 infinitely far away from charge distribution (finite size)

slide24

z

P

All scalars - no need to worry about direction

r

z

Almost point charge formula

y

a

f

dq

As z  0, V  kQ/a

As a  0 or z  inf, V  point charge

x

FIND ELECTRIC FIELD USING GRADIENT

(along z by symmetry)

E  0 as z  0 (for “a” finite)

E  point charge formula for z >> a

As Before

Example 23.11: Potential along Z-axis of a ring of charge

Q = charge on the ring

l = uniform linear charge density = Q/2pa

r = distance from dq to “P” = [a2 + z2]1/2

ds = arc length = adf

example potential due to a charged rod

Start with

  • Integrate over the charge distribution
  • Result

Check by differentiating

Example: Potential Due to a Charged Rod
  • A rod of length L located parallel to the x axis has a uniform linear charge density λ. Find the electric potential at a point P located on the y axis a distance d from the origin.
example 23 10 potential near an infinitely long charged line or charged conducting cylinder

Near line or outside cylinder r > R

E is radial. Choose radial integration path if

Above is negative for rf > ri with l positive

Inside conducting cylinder r < R

E is radial. Choose radial integration path if

Potential inside is constant and equals surface value

Example 23.10: Potential near an infinitely long charged line or charged conducting cylinder
example 23 12 potential at a symmetry point near a finite line of charge

Uniform linear charge density

Charge in length dy

Potential of point charge

Standard integral from tables:

Example 23.12: Potential at a symmetry point near a finite line of charge

Limiting cases:

  • Point charge formula for x >> 2a
  • Example 23.10 formula for near

field limit x << 2a

slide28

P

dA=adfda

q

r

z

R

a

f

Double integral

Integrate twice: first on azimuthal angle f from 0 to 2p which yields a factor of 2p then on ring radius a from 0 to R

x

(note: )

“Far field” (z>>R): disc looks like point charge

Use Anti-derivative:

“Near field” (z<<R): disc looks like infinite sheet of charge

Example: Potential on the symmetry axis of a charged disk

Q = charge on disk whose radius = R.

Uniform surface charge density s = Q/4pR2

Disc is a set of rings, each of them da wide in radius

For one of the rings: