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Static Electricity Lessons. The following Power Point is designed for teachers to use to plan inquiry-based static electricity lessons and to present these lessons to their students.

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Static Electricity Lessons


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    1. Static Electricity Lessons The following Power Point is designed for teachers to use to plan inquiry-based static electricity lessons and to present these lessons to their students. • The teacher slides give you an overview of the lesson, ideas for teaching each section of the lesson, and hints for facilitating the hands-on portions of the lesson. • The student slides are intended to be projected and/or printed and used by small groups during stations, investigations, or class discussions.

    2. Static Electricity Static Electricity Investigations Teacher Slides 3 – 13. Student Slides 14 - 32 Static Electricity and Lightning Teacher Slides 33 – 39. Students Slides 40 - 48

    3. Static Electricity InvestigationsBased on Interconnections Grade 5: Static Electricity, pg. 191 Teacher Slides

    4. Static Electricity Investigations Objectives and Indicators • List several occurrences of static electricity that happen in everyday life. • Describe the behavior of objects charged with static electricity in attracting or repelling without touching. • Investigate how various materials react differently to statically charged objects. ILOS • Demonstrate a sense of curiosity about nature. • Describe or explain observations carefully. • Use scientific language in oral and written communication.

    5. Static Electricity Investigations ENGAGE: Two Quick Demonstrations & Student Brainstorm EXPLORE: Plastic Wrap Tents EXPLAIN: Static Electricity Accordion Foldable ELABORATE: Static Electricity Stations EVALUATE: Soda Can Races EXTEND: Electroscopes

    6. Engage: 2 Quick Demos BAD HAIR DAY THE LEVITATING BAG Directions and an explanation for this demo come from: http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/lab/experiments/static-flyer-flying-bag. After doing the demo ask students what is different about this demonstration. Students should notice that the hair is attracted to the balloon, while the plastic bag ring is repelled by the balloon. To do this demonstration vigorously rub a volunteers head with a balloon. When you pull the balloon away, the volunteer’s hair should stay attracted to the balloon. If you move the balloon farther away, some of the volunteer’s hairs will stand on end. You do not need to explain charges at this point, just let students predict what is going on based on their own prior knowledge.

    7. ENGAGE: Student Brainstorm Ask students to name some everyday examples of static electricity. Use this brainstorm to pre-assess what students already know. EVERYDAY EXAMPLES OF STATIC ELECTRICITY • Laundry sticking together after coming out of the dryer • Hair sticking up after jumping on a trampoline • Getting a shock on a door knob after shuffling across the carpet • Getting a shock from someone else • Combing dry, clean hair • Getting a shock when you go down a plastic playground slide • Lightning

    8. EXPLORE: Plastic Wrap Tent Give students a paper towel and a square of plastic wrap. For more exploration, give them a variety of small objects such as pieces of Styrofoam, tissue paper pieces, kitty litter, or coffee grounds. Explain how to charge the plastic wrap by rubbing it with the paper towel. Then let students explore the plastic wrap by lifting it up from the center and by moving it over their arm or the small objects. Have students record observations and questions in their science notebooks.

    9. EXPLAIN: Static Electricity Notes Have students read the article: http://www.sciencemadesimple.com/static_electricity.html#easyread. Then give each student a note taking foldable (available on website). As a class go through the notetaking slides (in student slide section), have students discuss what they know, and complete the notes.

    10. ELABORATE: Static Electricity Stations To apply what they know about static electricity, students will visit 7 stations. Print direction slides (available in the student slide section) and set up supplies for students to use at each station. Supplies are listed in the note section of the direction slides. Have students record observations and write an explanation at each station. Push students to use vocabulary in their explanations – they should be able to do this after taking notes in the foldable. Explanations of each station are provided in the Teacher Reference Sheet: Static Electricity Investigations (available on the website) Example of a Good Station Explanation: Observation: After rubbing a balloon across hair, the hair will stick to the balloon. When you remove the balloon the hair sticks up. Explanation: This happens because the hair releases electrons and negative charges build up on the balloon. The hair is positively charged and the balloon is negatively charged, so the hair sticks to the balloon. Also, since all the hairs have a positive charge they repel each other and stand up in the air when you take away the balloon. charge negative positive neutral attract repel

    11. EVALUATE: Soda Can Races • Give each team a balloon, a variety of material (wool, cotton, etc), and an aluminum can. • Give teams a few minutes to explore which material best charges the balloon. Students can be creative in how they determine which material best charges the balloon. • Have each team send a representative to the race course (tiled hallways work well). • Give representatives 30 sec. – 1 min. to charge their balloon. When you say go, students need to use the charged balloon to push/pull the can from start to finish. • After the race have students create a Science Demonstration sheet that explains how to do the experiment and the science behind this fun activity.

    12. EVALUATE: Soda Can Races The Amazing Soda Can Race – Example Student Demonstration Sheet How to do it: • Blow up one balloon. • Rub your balloon with wool for 30 seconds. • Place the soda can on its side on a smooth surface, like a wooden or tiled floor. • Bring your balloon close to the can, but not touching the can. • The can should roll towards the balloon. • Keep moving the balloon so that the can follows. What is happening: When you rub the balloon with the wool piece negative charges from the wool build up on the balloon. Now the balloon has a negative charge. The aluminum can has a neutral charge (or positive charge). Since the charges are opposite the can is attracted to the balloon. The can will roll towards the balloon. Picture: - - - - - - - - - - --- + + +

    13. EXTEND: Electroscope An electroscope is an instrument used for detecting electrical charges. (To learn more visit: http://www.howstuffworks.com/electroscope-info.htm and http://biocircuits.ucsd.edu/outreach/?p=399) Building a homemade electroscope is a fun extension for the static electricity lesson. Students can make their own electroscope using simple materials. You can challenge them to figure out the charges on their electroscope based on what they have learned about static electricity. Provide students with the following electroscope handout and have fun! (For a handout visit: http://www.exploratorium.edu/snacks/electroscope/ )

    14. Static Electricity Investigations Student Slides

    15. Plastic Wrap Tent • Tear off a square piece of plastic wrap. • Rub a paper towel across the plastic wrap for 20 seconds. • Pick up the plastic wrap from the middle by pinching the center. What happens? • Keep holding the plastic wrap at the center and place it over your arm. What happens? • How do other objects react to your plastic wrap tent?

    16. Static Electricity Notes Read the article: http://www.sciencemadesimple.com/static_electricity.html#easyread Discuss with a partner: What do these pictures have to do with static electricity?

    17. Static Electricity Notes To make an accordion: • Start with the right side and fold in one rectangle. • Then continue to fan fold. • On the front cover write: Static Electricity

    18. Static Electricity Notes All matter is made up of atoms. The protons in an atom have a positive charge. The electrons in an atom have a negative charge.

    19. Static Electricity Notes Sometimes when you rub two materials together the electrons move. Then one object will have more negative charges. The other object will have more positive charges.

    20. Static Electricity Notes Negative charges will repel other negative charges.

    21. Static Electricity Notes Negative charges will be attracted to other neutral or positive charges.

    22. Static Electricity Notes So static electricity is the build up of charges on an object. Objects with like charges will repel. Objects with opposite charges will attract.

    23. Static Electricity Stations Today you will visit 7 static electricity stations. At each station you need to: Record your observations in writing or in a diagram. Write an explanation of how the station works. Be sure to use vocabulary in your explanations. charge negative positive neutral attract repel

    24. Swinging Cereal • Tie a Cherrio to a 12-inch piece of thread. • Hang your Cherrio and thread from the edge of a desk or a table. • Charge a comb by running it through long, straight hair or by rubbing it with wool. • Slowly bring the comb towards the hanging cereal. What happens? • Move the comb away and then slowly bring the comb to the cereal again. Now what happens?

    25. Bending Water • Charge a comb or a balloon by running it through long, dry hair or by rubbing it with wool. • Turn on the faucet so that the water runs in a slow steady stream. The water should be about 1/8 of an inch thick. • Slowly bring the comb or the balloon near the water. Watch what happens.

    26. Dancing Paper • Place the small pieces of tissue paper on a desk. • Charge the balloon by rubbing it with wool or with long, dry hair. • Bring the balloon close to the pile, but don’t touch. What happens?

    27. Snake Charmer • Place a 12-inch piece of yarn on a desk. • Charge the balloon by rubbing it with wool. • Bring the balloon close to the yarn. Can you make the yarn look like a snake attached to the balloon? • Gently pull the yarn down, about ¼ inch. Then let go. Can you make the yarn jump back up to the balloon?

    28. Magic Wands • Charge the wooden rod by rubbing wool across the rod for 20 seconds. • Swing the rod back and forth over a pile of paper dots. What happens? • Repeat procedures 1 and 2 with the metal rod and the plastic rod. • Which material makes the best “magic wand” and why?

    29. Levitating Bag • Charge the balloon by rubbing it with the material. • Flatten the plastic band on the table and rub the material on the band for 30 – 45 seconds. • Hold the plastic band by two corners. • Bring the plastic band so that it is about 1 foot over the balloon. Release the band. • What happens?

    30. Balloon Buddies • Tie a 12 inch piece of thread to the bottom of one balloon. • Tape the thread to the table so that the balloon hangs down. • Charge both balloons by rubbing them with wool or against someone’s hair. • Bring the balloon that is free near the balloon that is hanging. What happens?

    31. Soda Can Races • Each team will receive a balloon, a variety of material, and an aluminum can. • Your team will have 3 minutes to determine which material you would like to use to charge your balloon. • Then you will send a representative to the race course to use the charged balloon to push/pull your can from start to finish. • After the race you will create a Science Demonstration sheet that explains how to do the experiment and the science behind this amazing demonstration.

    32. Soda Can Races – Demonstration Sheet The Amazing Soda Can Race How to do it: What is happening: Picture:

    33. Static Electricity and LightningBased on Interconnections, Grade 5: Static Electricity and Lightning pg. 195 Teacher Slides

    34. Static Electricity and Lightning Objectives / Indicators • Describe the relationship between static electricity and lightning. • Compare the amount of static charge produced by rubbing various materials together. ILOs • Observe simple objects, patterns, and events and report their observations. • Compare things, processes, and events.

    35. Static Electricity and Lightning ENGAGE: Bill Nye Clip: Van de Graaff Generator EXPLORE: 3 Mini-Experiments EXPLAIN: Video, Lightning Reading and Lightning Diagram ELABORATE/ EVALUATE: Lightning Safety Brochure

    36. Engage: Van de Graaff Generator Have students watch the Bill Nye clip on the Van de Graaff Generator. Ask students to focus on what the Van de Graaff reminds them of and how it works. This is a great time to discuss static electricity discharge, when built up charges jump or move from one object to another. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-77IzaXGcg

    37. Explore: 3 Mini Experiments Have small groups conduct the three mini-experiments. These experiments demonstrate static electricity building up and discharge. The experiments help students to review static charges and make the connection between static electricity and lightning. Worksheet: Lightning Experiment Worksheet (worksheet on website and directions in the student slide section) Note: For an explanation of the 3 experiments see Teacher Reference Sheet: Static Electricity Stations. (available on website)

    38. Explain: Static Electricity and Lightning 1. Watch the NOVA video on Lightning. • Have students read the article, What is Lightning? and answer questions. You can find the article in Interconnections, pg. 200. • Have students create a lightning diagram in their science notebook based on what they have learned about how lightning is generated.

    39. Elaborate / Evaluate: Lightning Have students create a lightning safety brochure to demonstrate their knowledge of static electricity and lightning, and lightning safety. The brochure should answer the following questions. • How does lightning work? • What are the roles of static and current electricity in producing lightning? • How does someone stay safe during a lightning storm? Have students use the following website for research: http://www.weatherwizkids.com/weather-lightning.htm (More websites can be found on page 199 in Interconnections.)

    40. Static Electricity and Lightning Student Slides

    41. Van de Graff Generator What does this remind you of? How does it work? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-77IzaXGcg

    42. Snap, Crackle, Jump • Pour a small pile of rice cereal on a desk. • Charge the record by rubbing it with wool. • Hold the record about 1 inch above the pile of cereal. • Move the record around, over the cereal. • Look at the record from below. Investigate: How does the number of times you rub the record affect the amount of cereal that is picked up?

    43. Electrophorus • Set the foam plate upside down on a desk. • Set the pie plate upside down on the desk. It will be standing on the foam cup handle. • Charge the foam plate by rubbing it with wool for 1 minute. • Carefully pick up the pie plate using only the foam cup handle. • Flip the pie plate over and gently drop it on top of the foam plate. • Touch the edge of the pie plate with your finger. • Lift the pie plate off of the foam plate. Touch the bottom of the pie plate with your finger. • If possible, try this experiment in the dark, or in a dark corner. Investigate: How does the number of foam plates stacked on the desk affect this demonstration? Exploratorium Explanation: http://www.exploratorium.edu/science_explorer/sparker.html

    44. Sparking Lights • Charge a balloon by rubbing it with wool or hair. • Hold the charged balloon very near the glass of the bulb. What happens? • Try the same experiment in a dark corner or under a desk. Investigate: What happens if you use a material other than wool?

    45. NOVA Video: Lightning

    46. Static Electricity and Lightning • Read What is Lightning? • Answer the question your group is assigned and be prepared to share with the class. Group 1: How do charges form in clouds? Group 2: How does lightning travel? Group 3: What are the two different types of lightning? How are they different? Group 4: How does thunder form? Group 5: What is the 30/30 safety rule?

    47. Lightning Diagram Lightning Diagram: In your diagram show the charges in the cloud and on the ground. Label the bolts as negatively charged lightning or positively charged lightning.

    48. Lightning Safety Brochure Your task is to create a lightning safety brochure that teaches others about how lightning works and how to stay safe during a lightning storm. Be sure to answer the following questions in your brochure. • How does lightning work? • What are the roles of static and current electricity in producing lightning? • How does someone stay safe during a lightning storm?