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Opening Slide. Proven Integration Strategies for Government. Larry Singer, Vice President, US State and Local Government and Education Sales. The IT Challenge. 32 Million. 2007 worldwide IT labor force. 65%. of IT budgets to operations.

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Proven integration strategies for government

Proven Integration Strategies for Government

Larry Singer, Vice President, US State and Local Government and Education Sales


The it challenge
The IT Challenge

32 Million

2007 worldwide IT labor force

65%

of IT budgets to operations

Not enough investment in innovation ; too much in maintaining legacy infrastructure

Change is constant


Change is the only constant
Change is the only constant

  • Change is constant

  • Everyday events that send ripples throughout the organization, and the IT that supports it

  • Change is unexpected

  • A new administration, a news headline, a sudden shift in citizen opinion, a new contract

  • Change is disruptive

  • The goal is to minimize the impact of disruptions with an IT environment that is synchronized with the gov’t goals and mission

  • Change presents opportunities

  • The ability to adapt to change is a key advantage in gov’t

  • To survive government must adapt



Adaptive enterprise defined
Adaptive Enterprise Defined

Adaptive Enterprise architecture effectively supports the business of government, enables information sharing across traditional barriers, enhances government’s ability to deliver effective and timely services, and supports agencies in their efforts to improve government functions and services.

National Assoc. of State CIOs (NASCIO)

Enterprise Architecture Dev’t Tool-Kit


Today s business of government challenges require it to adapt
Today’s “business of government” challenges require IT to adapt

  • The big shifts

  • All processes and content will be transformed from physical and static to digital, mobile and virtual

  • The demand for simplicity, manageability and adaptability will change how citizens work and interface with government

  • Government ROI justification for IT projects is the norm on almost all levels

  • Legislation and Mandates sometimes drive IT requirements


Adaptive enterprise solutions

Business Continuity & Availability to adapt

IT Consolidation

Management

Information Lifecycle Management

End-User Workplace Solutions

Adaptive Enterprise Solutions

Continuity

Consolidation

Control

Compliance

Collaboration


Move from maintenance to innovation
Move from maintenance to to adaptinnovation

IT future state

IT current state

Applicationmaintenance 15%

Applicationmaintenance 30%

Applicationinnovation45%

Infrastructuremaintenance42%

Infrastructuremaintenance30%

Applicationinnovation23%

Infrastructureinnovation10%

Infrastructureinnovation5%

Source: HP IT department



Hp it 2005

750+ to adapt

data marts

>1,200 active IT projects

~4,000

Applications

85+ data centers in 29 countries

<50% of resources time

dedicated to innovation

30% IT managed by IT

100+ HP IT sites in 53 countries

~19,000 IT professionals

including contingent workforce

IT 4+% of

revenue

Under-managed network

HP IT 2005

Too many directions, not enough connections


Hp top 5 it initiatives

IT Transformation to adapt

HP Top 5 IT initiatives

Global Data

Centers

Portfolio

Management

Enterprise

Data

Warehouse

IT

Workforce

Effectiveness

World-Class

IT


Opening slide

100% IT managed by IT to adapt

~500 active Business Projects at any given time

90%

HP employees – 10% contractors

~1500

Applications

Less than 30 HP IT core collaboration

sites

WW

% of Revenue cut in half

80% of resources time

dedicated to innovation

Optimized,Cost effective, & secure network

6 NGDCs

In 3 zones

1 EDW

2008

The right direction. The right connections.


Can we share our experiences with you
Can we share our experiences with you? to adapt

What are your IT professionals working on?

Can you consistently quantify business benefits for all projects?

Can you report % of projects on time?

Do you know the average age of servers and other costly assets?

How many data marts do your servers feed?

How many next generation switches are you running?

Do you know if third party support is cost effective?

We can help. Let’s get started.


The cio it consolidation challenge run your government it like a business

Government Business challenges to adapt

Drive down costs

Improve operational efficiency

Control enterprise-wide costs

Increase Return on IT

Technical challenges

Rationalize and standardize technology

Replace disparate systems and technology

Limit number of platforms and applications

The CIO IT Consolidation challenge: run your Government IT “like a business”

Need to break down functional IT silos to deliver positive business outcomes

Infrastructure

Optimization


It consolidation solution portfolio

Many isolated, duplicated, hard to manage application environments

Automated, end-to-end managed IT & application shared services

IT Consolidation Solution Portfolio

  • Application Consolidation

  • Data Consolidation

  • Data Centre Consolidation

  • IT Management Consolidation

  • Infrastructure Consolidation

  • Workplace Consolidation

Over-provisioned, unshared, distributed, inflexible infrastructure

Virtualized, optimized, scale up/down, reliable infrastructure

  • Storage Consolidation

  • Network Consolidation

  • Server Consolidation

Many dedicated, diverse, dispersed boxes (servers, storages, networks)

Fewer simplified, standardized and centralized platforms


It consolidation journey

IT environmentsConsolidationOptimize

PlatformConsolidationSimplify

  • Goals

  • Controlled IT Costs

  • Improved utilization

  • Reduced risk

  • Fast Return (ROI)

  • Scope

  • Focused on existing IT infrastructure

  • People, process & technology

  • Attributes

  • Rationalized boxes, tools, applications

  • Streamlined operations

  • Disaster recovery

  • Partially virtualized

  • Prone to re-consolidation

DedicatedSilos Costly, inefficient

  • Goals

  • Reduced costs (TCO)

  • Simplified infrastructure

  • Scope

  • Systems & storage

  • Application platforms

  • Attributes

  • Fewer servers

  • Shared storage

  • Standardized platforms

  • Limited virtualization

  • Prone to re-consolidation

  • Goals

  • Fast response

  • Ease of execution

  • Scope

  • Individual project

  • Attributes

  • Many isolated, diverse boxes, applications, tools

  • Hard to manage

  • Hard to change

  • Over-provisioned

IT Consolidation journey

Strategic IT ConsolidationAlign

  • Goals

  • Cost & business responsiveness

  • Central operation & distributed control

  • Rapid IT-enabled time-to- business value

  • Scope

  • Focused on innovation

  • Business & IT lifecycles

  • Transformation of IT to a service orientation

  • Attributes

  • Sustaining IT platforms

  • Virtualized, automated shared resources

  • Standardized infrastructure, applications, business processes

  • “Single pane” operations and management

From tactical to strategic, transformational, consolidation


It consolidation benefits
IT Consolidation benefits environments

  • Improve business and IT operational linkage

  • Increase number of strategic projects & success rate

  • Increase IT spending on innovation (20-30%)

  • Reduce time to value, reduce application deployment (in hours) and reduce project backlog

Enable competitive advantage

Shared Services

  • Further increase utilization (40-60%) & improve operations efficiency (up to 1-200+ admin-to-server ratio)

  • Increase system availability & service levels

  • Improve responsiveness to business changes

  • Improve Riot (EVA/IT spending) to best-in-class

Improve operational efficiency

Flexible Infrastructure

  • Improve resource utilization (10-20% to 30-40%) & return on IT asset (reduce CAPEX)

  • Streamline operations & increase efficiency (reduce OPEX)

  • Lower TCO (average of 20%) & shift maintenance savings to innovation

Do more with less

Simplified Platforms

Source: HP, IDC and McKinsey


Strategic choices for it transformation
Strategic choices for IT transformation environments

Transformational

outsourcing

In-house

transformation

Sourcing

continuum

  • Transformation is part of an outsourcing engagement

  • Innovation elements for transformation through an innovation Council

  • Driving transformation to Next Generation Data Centers

  • Drive your own IT Transformation

  • Innovate your data centers

  • HP provides consulting, integration, support, education and program management

  • Who manages assets?

  • Who owns the service?

  • Where are the assets housed?

  • Who owns the assets?

  • What controls are needed for governance ?

19

12 February 2008


Key transformation domains
Key transformation domains environments

Application Transformation

IT “Business” Transformation for Government

ServiceManagement

Data CenterFacility & Infrastructure Transformation

InformationTransformation

20

12 February 2008


Transformation methodology simple modular proven
Transformation methodology; environmentssimple, modular, proven

Operate current

Build and transition

Sub-projects

Current state

Analyze

Define strategy Objectives and metrics

Build roadmap

Maturity m +x

ROI

Desired state

Architect -- meet your objectives

Validate results

Maturity m

Plan, Design, Build, Migrate

People-Process-Technology

People-Process-Technology

Operate new

Manage project, change, quality, architecture, governance and value realization

21

12 February 2008


Opening slide

Roadmap environmentsbased on priorities

Maturity models play a key role in the transformation roadmap

Current and desired state based on standard metrics

Domains

Culture & Staff

(IT Personnel)

Demand, Supply & IT Governance

Management Tools & Processes

Technology &

Architecture

Customer

Stage 5:

Adaptive, Shared Infrastructure

Adaptive, Pooled, Automated Infrastructure

Policy-Based, End-To-End, Management

IT Processes Automated & Integrated with Business Processes

Business Process Focused

Real Time Alignment of Supply to Demand

Desired

State

Service-Based Management.

Service Centric, Integrated IT Processes

SOA- Compliant Infrastructure Services

Service Focused

Supply Driven by Service Demand Forecast

Stage 4:

Service Oriented

Integrated, Tools & Information

Collection Consolidated, Rationalized, IT Processes

Stage 3:

Optimized

Consolidated, Virtualized, Shared Infrastructure

Cross Functional Expert Teams

Centralized Governance

Standardized Tools Standard IT Processes, ITIL

Stage 2:

Standardized

Standardized Technology

Departmental/ Teams

Centralized Policies, Supply Constrained

Current

State

Project-Based Management Tools & Information

Ad Hoc IT Processes

Manage to Project Resources & Budget

Stage 1:

Compart-mentalized

Stage

Dedicated, Project-Based

Technology Focused

22

12 February 2008


Best practices from our experiences

Timing is crucial – the time is right when IT is considered a strategic part of the business

Transformation is about doing things differently – be open to new approaches

Transformation requires investment – prepare the right business case

Once you get the approval, it is all about execution – deliver the promised value while minimizing downtime

Cross business and project governance are key

Management of change for people, process and technology

Determine the right scope, metrics and strategy early

Best practices from our experiences

23

12 February 2008


Key transformation domains1
Key transformation domains considered a strategic part of the business

Application Transformation

IT “Business” Transformation for Government

ServiceManagement

Data CenterFacility & Infrastructure Transformation

InformationTransformation

24

12 February 2008


Opening slide

IT Business transformation considered a strategic part of the businessareas for transformation

  • IT operating model

    • IT as a cost/technology center

    • Running IT as a Business

    • IT is the business

  • IT sourcing model

    • In-sourced

    • Service Brokering

    • Outsourced

  • IT governance

    • Enterprise architecture

    • Demand and portfolio management

    • Financial management

    • Understanding and compliance to regulations

  • Management of change

25

12 February 2008


Opening slide

Making the shift to a business partner considered a strategic part of the business

Techno-centric

Service-centric

Business-centric

Business view of IT

. . . a problem

. . . a solution

. . . a partnership

IT as a COST center

IT as a BUSINESSusing Shared SERVICES Model

IT as a

BUSINESS innovationenabler

IT organizations are becoming like a “business” within the Enterprise, moving to an effective, value driven supplier/consumer modelwith the business to deliver shared services

26

12 February 2008


Demand and portfolio management
Demand and portfolio management considered a strategic part of the business

“Our IT activities are not based on business decisions”

“We have no consolidated view of work, ‘a single instance of truth”

“We are unable to adapt to changing business priorities”

CIO

“We are inefficient with our resources and budgets”

“We have varying levels of project management maturity”

“We are highly reactive in our approach to project and portfolio management”

Planning and execution challenges

The Operations

Demand

Lack of visibility and controls

Lack of structuralflexibility

Supply

IT

27

12 February 2008


Demand portfolio management solution
Demand/portfolio management solution considered a strategic part of the business

Demand and Portfolio Management Solution

Align operations & IT Increase productivity Reduce project failure risk

Integrated services and software

Services

Software

  • IT Governance and process design

  • Business analysis, Project Management and implementation best practices

  • Project and Portfolio Management Center

  • Service Management Center

  • $18.8 million in annual savings by canceling non-strategic projects -Large food retailer & Distributor

  • Project funding process reduced from 6 weeks to 1 week –Large commercial airline

  • 50% improvement in project manager productivity –Packaging & high performance materials

  • Increased project team productivity by30% –Birlasoft

  • Reduced risky projects from 50% to 14% -Autotrader.com

  • IT project scope changes dropped by 57% -Large food retailer & distributor

28

12 February 2008


Service management
Service Management considered a strategic part of the business

Application Transformation

IT “Business” Transformation for Government

ServiceManagement

Data CenterFacility & Infrastructure Transformation

InformationTransformation

29

12 February 2008


Opening slide

Leveraging ITIL v3 considered a strategic part of the business

Role of theIT Function

Service Management

ITIL v3

Strategic partner

  • Focus: Business-IT Alignment & Integration

  • Service Mgmt for Business & Technology

  • Automated and Integrated Operations

  • Strategy and Portfolio Governance

  • Continuous Improvement

IT Service

Management

Serviceprovider

ITIL v2

  • Focus: Quality and Efficiency of IT Processes

  • IT is a service provider

  • IT is separable from business

  • IT budgets as expenses to control

IT Infrastructure

Management

GITIM (ITIL v1)

Technologyprovider

  • Focus: Stability and Control of the Infrastructure

  • IT are technical experts

  • IT concerned with minimizing business disruption

  • IT budgets are driven by external benchmarks

Time

30

12 February 2008


Running a service centric it to match business priorities
Running a service-centric IT to match business priorities considered a strategic part of the business

Operations/IT Strategy

Service Consumer

Project or Business Process

Business

Business critical processes

Demand

Supply

The Service

Business/Application Services

IT Services

Application/Infrastructure Services

Core Infrastructure Shared Services

(contain the physicalresources)

Enterprise IT

Outsourced IT

31

12 February 2008


Opening slide

Demand & Portfolio Management considered a strategic part of the business

Infrastructure Management

Change & Configuration Management

Asset & IT Financial Management

The Service

Business Service Management

Consolidated Service Desk

Service Management solutions

Integrated software and services

32

12 February 2008


Opening slide

Application Transformation considered a strategic part of the business

Application Transformation

IT “Business” Transformation for Government

ServiceManagement

Data CenterFacility & Infrastructure Transformation

InformationTransformation

33

33

12 February 2008


Apps became the business of government but still fail to deliver the outcomes
Apps became the business of government… considered a strategic part of the businessbut still fail to deliver the outcomes

More than 50% of IT projects are completed late, over budget or lacking intended features.

Almost 20% are cancelled before completion

The Standish Group

In the last 30 years, tools & processes have not kept up with the change

AgilityGAP

  • Apps are still:

    • Monolithic

    • Legacy

    • Not well integrated

ProcessGAP

  • Processes are still:

    • Manual

    • Inefficient

    • Siloed

InfrastructureGAP

  • Infrastructure is still:

    • Monolithic

    • Under-utilized

    • Too complex

34

12 February 2008


Taking a holistic approach
Taking a holistic approach considered a strategic part of the business

Packaged Applications (SAP, Oracle)

Application Development & Integration

SOA Transformation

Application Modernization

Four major domains of expertise

35

12 February 2008


A pragmatic approach to application modernization achieving business outcomes
A pragmatic approach to Application Modernization- achieving business outcomes

  • TSYS Call Center Application

  • Modernization

  • Rapid time-to-market (6 months)

  • 95% reduction in hardware costs

  • 80% reduction in software costs

  • 15% increase in call center productivity

Retire

Re-engineer

Replace

Rehost

  • Samsung Life Insurance

  • Rollout 12 Months, US $25M, roughly 1000 person months

  • Over 2000 DB tables, 53,000 SAM files, 40,000 tapes converted

  • US $22M cost savings over 4 years

  • Project cost break even point at 18 months

Retain

Different paths to Application

Modernization

36

12 February 2008


Solutions for application transformation
Solutions for application transformation business outcomes

Helping you with key application Initiatives across the lifecycle

Development

SOA Transformation

QualityAssurance

Planning

Application Modernization

Application Development & Integration

Staging/ Deployment

Change/

Retire

Packaged Applications (SAP, Oracle)

Application Operations

Application Support

Application

Lifecycle Optimization

IT Operations

37

12 February 2008


Opening slide

Information Transformation business outcomes

Application Transformation

IT “Business” Transformation for Government

ServiceManagement

Data CenterFacility & Infrastructure Transformation

InformationTransformation

38

38

12 February 2008


Information management transformation areas
Information management transformation areas business outcomes

Business Intelligence

Unified Information Management

Content Management

Data Management

Information Management is all about capturing, managing, retaining, delivering, and/or analyzing information across its lifecycle for better business outcomes


Information management challenges drive organizations to act
Information management challenges drive organizations to act business outcomes

Current information environment

Business impact

  • Lost opportunity – revenue, service, profit

  • Lost productivity

  • Multiple “versions of the truth”

  • Poor data quality

  • Increased risk to the organization

  • Siloed data marts

  • Duplicate data and calculations

  • Limited access to shared data

  • Excessive effort spent pulling and massaging data

  • Few reporting standards

  • No data architecture or governance

  • Poor data quality

  • Too many obsolete reports

Solutions

  • Risk and compliance

  • Supply chain intelligence

  • Customer intelligence

  • CIO analytics

  • BI consolidation

  • Enterprise data warehousing

  • Data marts

  • BI portfolio management

40

12 February 2008


Business intellegence bi as a journey the maturity model
Business Intellegence “BI” as a journey: business outcomes The Maturity Model

41

12 February 2008


Opening slide

Data Center Facility & Infrastructure Transformation business outcomes

Application Transformation

IT “Business“ Transformation for Government

ServiceManagement

Data CenterFacility & Infrastructure Transformation

InformationTransformation

42

42

12 February 2008


Data center transformation framework for better business outcomes
Data Center Transformation framework for better business outcomes

Data Center Transformation

Data Center Strategy

Data Center

Design

Data Center Deployment & Transition

Data Center Operation

Data Center Continual Improvement

Decrease Cost

Mitigate Risk

Accelerate Business Growth

Business outcomes

IT Outcomes

Service lifecycle

Energy and Space Efficient

Always On

Global and Virtual

Service Oriented and Automated

Automation

Management

Power &

Cooling

IT Systems

& Services

Security

Virtualization

Adaptive Infrastructure enabling the next generation Data Centers

From HP.

43

12 February 2008


It s energy woes some scary numbers

The total power demand by servers WW in 2005 was equivalent to about fourteen 1000 MW power plants. (Jonathan G. Koomey, Ph.D. Staff Scientist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Consulting Professor, Stanford University, February 15, 2007)

IT’s energy woes: some scary numbers

Servers in the United States and their attendant cooling systems consumed 45 billion kilowatt-hours of energy in 2005. That's more than Mississippi and 19 other states (“U.S. servers slurp more power than Mississippi”, Cnet News, February 14, 2007)

A typical 10,000-square-foot data center consumes enough juice to turn on more than 8,000 60-watt light bulbs . . . companies that own them could end up paying millions of dollars this year just to keep their computers turned on. And it's getting more expensive. (CIO Magazine, April 15, 2006)

“Beam me u …….ah……… Scotty …………….…..… Scotty?”

44

12 February 2008


Opening slide

Hitting the spectrum to about fourteen 1000 MW power plants. (

Infrastructure integration

Data center planning, design, optimization and management

Integrating state-of-the-art mission critical facilities

End-to-endcapabilities

Concept to operations

Global reach

Spanning clients in all regions of the world

Capitalizing on leading-edge intellectual property

An industry-changing event:

EYP Mission Critical Facilities

Best-in-class Mission Critical Facilities consulting firm

45

45

12 February 2008

12 February 2008


Performance evaluation energy efficiency the onion approach from core to source
Performance Evaluation – Energy Efficiency to about fourteen 1000 MW power plants. (The ‘Onion Approach’ fromCore to Source

Electric performance

Server performance

IT

Performance

Primary energy performance

HVAC performance

EYP MCF project: First LEEDTM Data Center

120,000 sf data center for Fannie Mae in a 250,000 sf new building

This facility consisted of 60,000 sf raised floor computer room, 30,000 sf of infrastructure space, 25,000 sf of equipment yard and a 120,000 sf, three-story plus basement office building

46

12 February 2008


Opening slide

HP Thermal Zone Mapping to about fourteen 1000 MW power plants. (

Quantification of overlapping regions

  • Areas that are served by 3 or more CRAC units are be classified as “gold”— target that space for placement of business critical machines

  • Areas without redundancy are the highest risk areas

47

47

12 February 2008

12 February 2008


Opening slide

Current state – 70 centers, 850K sqft. to about fourteen 1000 MW power plants. (

Future state – 52 centers

7 NGDC; high density power & cooling

16 global/regional

29 dedicated customer centers

1.1M+ sqft. projected

Remote monitoring

90% off shored

Costa Rica, KL, Bangalore, China…

Platform & Process Standardization

Adaptive Infrastructure Services

Application migration & on boarding

HP Services Customer Data Centers

Driving global platform and process standardization

Norway (2)

Finland

Sweden (2)

Netherlands (3)

United Kingdom (5)

Toronto (2)

Germany (7)

Belgium (3)

Switzerland (3)

Columbus

Littleton

France (2)

Denver

Italy

Seoul

Cincinnati

Spain

Colorado Springs

Sterling

Alpharetta

Suwanee

Houston

Tampa

Monterrey

Kuala Lumpur (2)

Singapore (2)

São Paulo

Sydney(2)

Perth

Christchurch

Melbourne

Next-Generation Data Centers

Global/Regional/Customer Dedicated

48

12 February 2008


Adaptive infrastructure as a service
Adaptive Infrastructure as a Service to about fourteen 1000 MW power plants. (

Power andCooling

IT Systemsand Services

Management

Security

Virtualization

Automation

Optimized for

Pre-defined environment

1

2

Adaptive Infrastructure as a Service

  • High-density datacenter optimized for demandingpower & cooling

  • Owned & secured by HP, managed using ITIL/ITSM tools & processes

  • Flexible dial up and down access to latest technology

  • Expert resources & methods to deliver fast application modernization

  • SAP

  • MS Exchange

  • Infrastructure:

    • Linux

    • Windows

    • HP-UX

3

based on

Adaptive Infrastructure innovations

49

12 February 2008


Standardization overview
Standardization overview to about fourteen 1000 MW power plants. (

Platform standardization – Standards driven environment

Technology and Standards

Facility

EnterpriseApplication(s)

Operating Systems

Architected Interfaces

Unix

MS Server

Linux

Compute Standards

  • Shared Services

  • Web Server

  • Middleware

.Net – J2ee - LAMP

Platform(HW & OS)

Network

Cooling

Network Standards

Power

Thermodynamics Modeling

50

12 February 2008


What we talked about today
What we talked about today to about fourteen 1000 MW power plants. (

Application Transformation

IT “Business” Transformation for Government

ServiceManagement

Data CenterFacility & Infrastructure Transformation

InformationTransformation

51

12 February 2008


Considering elements for transformation
Considering Elements for Transformation to about fourteen 1000 MW power plants. (

Service Management

Infrastructure

Applications

Information Management

Outsourcing

  • Consolidation & Migration

  • Data Center Transformation

  • Network Solutions

  • Bus Continuity & Availability

  • Mission Critical

  • Deployment & Support

  • Apps Modernization & SOA

  • Packaged Application (SAP, Oracle)

  • Apps Development Integration & Management

  • Business Intelligence/EDW

  • Documents & Records Mgmt

  • Info Archival & eDiscovery

  • IT Service Management

  • Business Service Management

  • Project & Portfolio Mgmt

  • Infrastructure

  • Applications

  • EUWS

  • Managed Print

  • BPO F&A

  • AI-as-a-Service


Progression by understanding your government business needs
Progression by understanding your government business needs to about fourteen 1000 MW power plants. (

Examine operations/IT strengths, weaknesses, priorities and role in success

Profile

Identify critical areas of impact and investment based on priorities

Prioritize

Recommend operations/IT approaches and investments that address the critical priorities

Prescribe


The end result of it transformation for government
The end result of IT Transformation for Government to about fourteen 1000 MW power plants. (

Gov’t Operations and IT synchronized to improve on change

Government Operations

Information Technology

Benefits: simplicity, agility, value


Translation to government s mission
Translation to Government’s Mission to about fourteen 1000 MW power plants. (

Safer Communities

Protect our citizens and infrastructure

Sustain Government Operations

Provide a secure, agile & innovative infrastructure to meet/exceed the traditional and evolving missions of the government agencies

Better Services to Citizens:

Make government more citizen centric


Closing slide
Closing Slide to about fourteen 1000 MW power plants. (