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MAKING THE BIGGEST DIFFERENCE. Using evaluative thinking to get the most out of your project. What will we do today?. Introduce ourselves Making the biggest difference: Using evaluative thinking to get the most out of your project (and our role in helping you do this).

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making the biggest difference

MAKING THE BIGGEST DIFFERENCE

Using evaluative thinking to get the most out of your project

what will we do today
What will we do today?
  • Introduce ourselves
  • Making the biggest difference: Using evaluative thinking to get the most out of your project (and our role in helping you do this).
  • Vision: Inspiring and improving practice (activity: creating a vision map)
  • Evaluation in practice - Tools and techniques(activity: using critical questions to guide your choices of tools and techniques)
who are point research
Who are Point Research?
  • Independent research company, (est. 1997).
  • Focus on social change and innovation
    • supporting individuals and organisations to use evaluative thinking to make the biggest difference they can
    • capturing the impact and journey of social innovation

(but we also do lots of other things)

    • Qualitative (stories) and quantitative (numbers) focus (capture hearts and minds
some of our 2012 projects include
Some of our 2012 projects include…
  • Communities and change
    • Know Your Neighbours evaluation
    • Refugee Health Collaborative evaluation
    • Children, young people & their families and whānau
      • Amplify action enquiry - research team with children yrs 5-8
      • Vodafone World of Difference evaluation
      • Youth “Voice of NZ” Survey (13-21 year olds)
      • ASAH – meeting the needs of 13-18 year olds who seek help for sexual violence or abuse
      • Youthtown i-project – developmental activities and opportunities for 9-13 year olds
    • Other
      • ADHB Health Voice
      • Te TimitangaHou – Homeless Court evaluation & report
      • Employment of people with disabilities formative evaluation
      • Plunket Family Partnership impact profiles

Our experience with education/schools includes community consultation processes to inform strategic planning, evaluation of outside education programmes (e.g. Keeping ourselves Safe, sports development programmes), PAFT evaluation, education focus groups

what we would like you to think about
What we would like you to think about…

JRM have supported your project to build better family and whānau engagement in education to support better educational outcomes for disadvantaged children

  • How do you know you are building better family and whānau engagement?
  • Openness, honesty & ongoing reflection “what more can we be doing? How can we be doing it better.”
thinking evaluatively

Thinking evaluatively

Using evaluative thinking to get the most out of your project

how can we show that
How can we show that…?
  • We are building whānau and family engagement in education that supports better educational outcomes for disadvantaged children and;
  • What we are doing is making a difference to people’s lives
outcome of the workshop
Outcome of the workshop
  • We can understand how to use evaluative thinking and evaluation methods and techniques to:
    • Support and accelerate the changes we want to make
    • Find out the difference we are making
    • Report and share our findings
  • We understand how what we are doing contributes our overall vision
  • We understand how what we are doing contributes to the overall vision of the Trust.
  • We understand the different roles of our evaluators and how they can help us achieve our vision.
point research role support
Point Research role + support

Support organisations to monitor engagement and service delivery

Inspire good practice using reflection and evaluative thinking

Advance the state of knowledge and practice

what is good to understand
What is good to understand…
  • We are not adding another layer of accountability

Instead…

  • We are adding another layer of thinking designed to help you make the most difference you can.
slide13

Demystifying

Evaluation

what is evaluation
What is evaluation?

Aim of evaluation is simply to identify…

  • What is working well
  • What is not working well
  • What needs to change
  • What difference is it making (impacts and outcomes)
purpose of developmental approach
Purpose of Developmental Approach

A developmental approach means we continually check, reflect, adapt

    • Looking at what we do
    • Reflecting
    • Making changes to what we do

We do some of this anyway (e.g. raising children):

  • No one right way
  • Formulas don’t work – feed water sunshine grow
  • Try things (reflect, adapt, check, reflect, adapt)
a developmental approach helps to improve and accelerate change
A developmental approach helps to improve and accelerate change
  • Which parts of what you do are making a difference (or the most difference)
  • For whom?
aligns with funders requirements
Aligns with funders’ requirements
  • What you did and why
  • What worked
  • What we can learn from this and what learnings we can share
inspiring and improving practice

Inspiring and Improving Practice

Purpose: To improve and accelerate change

the importance of vision
The importance of VISION
  • Literature is telling us … don’t lose sight of your vision
  • Clarity about what you are trying to achieve
  • Clear vision (dream)

Quick Test – How would you explain your vision to someone at a bus stop?

vision is what you are working towards so inevitably shapes what you do
Vision is what you are working towards so inevitably shapes what you do

Vision 1

Families are engaged in their children’s early education

Vision 2

All children have the opportunity to participate in early childhood education

what is your vision
What is your vision?

Vision is your big picture or dream

  • What you want to see
  • Guides or drives what you do

(What gets you out of bed in the morning? What keeps you going?)

(note: Mission is your purpose or reason for being “Who we are and what we do".)

why have a shared vision
Why have a shared vision?

A shared vision can be the foundation of change.

  • How do you know that your vision is one which is shared by others?
workshop vision mapping
Workshop: Vision Mapping
  • Your vision
  • What is the change you want to see working towards your vision (outcomes – choose a couple)
  • What needs to happen to achieve this (2 or 3 key activities that underpin this)
    • (How do you know those are the right activities?)
  • How will you know if you have been effective (how will you measure it)
your vision
YOUR VISION

Outcome 2(change towards your vision)

Outcome 1 (change towards your vision)

Activity

Activity

Activity

Activity

Activity

Activity

Measurement

Measurement

Measurement

Measurement

Measurement

Measurement

developmental approach1
Developmental approach
  • Keep visiting map you are doing
  • I.e. check, reflect, adapt
  • What is working well?
  • What is not working well?
  • What needs to change?
  • What difference is it making? (impacts and outcomes)
  • How do you know?
improving and accelerating change is about
Improving and accelerating change is about …
  • Being intentional
  • Being audience or user focused
  • Thinking about what you are doing
  • Adapting
  • Doing what makes a difference
  • Letting go of what doesn’t
slide30

Remember…

Hold tight to your VISION

not your activities

evaluation in practice

Evaluation in Practice

Tools and techniques to capture the change we are making

evaluation basics
Evaluation basics…
  • What is it you need to find out?
  • Who will you find this out from? (service users, stakeholders)
  • How will find this out?
  • How will you share your findings?
  • Who will you share with them with?
evaluation toolkit
Evaluation toolkit
  • What tools and methods to you need to measure the change you are making?
    • Variety of methods (“evaluation trends”)
    • Never one right (or wrong) method – it is all context dependent
    • Methods can be adapted and combined
    • Think about using a mixture of qualitative and quantitative methods
two types of data
Two types of data
  • Qualitative data (hearts)
    • Best explain the why and how
    • Gathered from people, documents, case studies
    • Can include photos, videos, audio recordings & other non-text data
    • Quantitative data (minds)
    • Capture the what, who and when
    • Statistical representation (can be counted)
common qualitative methods and our favourites
Common qualitative methods(and our favourites)
  • Interviews (conversations with a purpose - Alex)
  • Focus groups (‘conversation groups’, ‘café conversations’)
  • Anything which involves post it notes
  • Impact profiles (stories of change)
  • Online surveys
  • Observation
common quantitative methods and our favourites
Common quantitative methods(and our favourites)
  • Surveys (paper-based and online) (primary data)
  • Secondary data e.g.
    • Census
    • MoE
    • MoH
    • Police
  • Can use creative ways of collecting – e.g. Warehouse “stand on the line”
how to choose the right tool
How to choose the right tool
  • What do you want to measure?
  • Who is your audience? (tools for children, communities)
  • Where will you collect the data?
  • Who else will be involved? (participatory methods e.g. young parents/young parent-led)
  • What resources do you have? Need?
  • What are your skills?
  • Opportunities for collaboration/partnership?
reporting your findings
Reporting your findings
  • What do you want to capture/need to report
  • How are you going to deliver it? (format)
  • Who are you going to share it with?

Don’t forget to report back to your community/partners

evaluation in practice1

Evaluation in Practice

Workshop: Shaping your Developmental Approach

activity
Activity
  • As a group, complete some (or all) of the critical questions worksheet

(You don’t need to be confined to the worksheet, use paper, post its, pictures to help you form ideas/illustrate)

You may already be working on a question in your initiative (and have some answers). In this case, we would like you to share what you are doing

Or

We may need to work out together what you can do. In that case, jot down your ideas as a starting point.

need some help go back to the basics
Need some help? Go back to the basics…
  • What is it you need to find out?
  • Who will you find this out from? (service users, stakeholders)
  • How will find this out?
  • How will you share your findings?
  • Who will you share with them with?
some ideas to get you started
Some ideas to get you started?

Think about your audience:

  • Ask!
  • Online surveys (free online tools survey monkey)
  • Short paper surveys
  • Feedback forms
  • Interviews
  • Focus groups
  • Café conversations
  • Graffiti walls
  • Continuums
  • Photo voice
  • Secondary data collection
reporting

Reporting

Bringing it all together…

writing an evaluation report
Writing an evaluation report

“Great questions make great reporting”.

(Diane Sawyer)

  • Three main areas:
    • Content
    • Look and feel
    • Usability
record what you are doing as you go
RECORD what you are doing as you go

Record changes that you have made and why e.g.

  • Brokered a relationship between an agency delivering services to young people, help them relocate to the old school dental clinic at a school
  • Organised a celebrating success evening
reporting1
Reporting
  • What do you want to capture/need to report
  • How are you going to deliver it (format)
  • Who are you going to share it with

Don’t forget to report back to your service users

hearts and minds think about
Hearts and minds. Think about…
  • What would an amazing report:
  • Contain (has to have what is needed)
  • Capture (share)
  • Look like (format)
  • Think hearts and minds

(Might help to think of disappointments and what could be done better)

reporting creatively
Reporting creatively
  • Make sure your hard work isn’t shelved. Your report may contain (or may consist of…):
    • Photographs
    • Stories/case studies
    • Websites with stories/videos
    • Video
    • Infographics
    • Slide shows
    • Quotes

Any other ideas?

example one mphs
Example One: MPHS
  • We asked 9 – 13 year olds to tell us
    • what it was like to live in their community,
    • their hopes and dreams
    • how they like to be treated.
    • We chose a method which would capture their imagination (photos) and which would extend their skills. We also used this to report…
slide50

Tagging not a work of art just a disgrace to our community.Tagging it doesn’t show your artistic skills, it just shows your (recklessness) throughout the community.

slide51

They can’t see what goes on inside. They can’t help if they don’t know. We have to show them because if we don’t we’ll be stuck in this forever.We need security and we can’t get that unless they know how to help. You have to say for them to help. They have to see for themselves

slide52

When I’m stuck and don’t know what to do I have to stay strong just like this tree. My roots are firmly in the ground and I stand tall like a tree.

example two adhb
Example Two: ADHB
  • Patient experience survey
    • What patients think is most important to their care
    • What their experience was with these dimensions
    • What staff can do to respond to what patients are saying