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From Lab to Market: Accelerating Renewable Energy Innovation and Deployment. Robert J. Noun Executive Director Communications and External Affairs November 18, 2008. Setting the Bar Higher – Gigawatt-Scale Renewables . Solar Vision 10% U.S. electricity by 2025. Wind Vision

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from lab to market accelerating renewable energy innovation and deployment

From Lab to Market: Accelerating Renewable Energy Innovation and Deployment

Robert J. Noun

Executive Director

Communications and External Affairs

November 18, 2008

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC

slide2

Setting the Bar Higher – Gigawatt-Scale Renewables

  • Solar Vision
    • 10% U.S. electricity by 2025
  • Wind Vision
    • 20% U.S. electricity by 2030

Energy Independence & Security Act 2007

36 billion gallons of renewable fuels by 2022

Requires investment in new infrastructure:

  • Overall in U.S. = $2 trillion
  • Worldwide = $22 trillion
    • Biofuels
    • Wind
    • Solar

$2 trillion (est.)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

getting to speed and scale key challenges

Implementing Renewable Gigawatts at Scale

  • Cost of renewable electricity
  • Performance and reliability
  • Infrastructure robustness and capacity
  • Dispatchability of renewables

BARRIERS

Displacement of Petroleum-Based Fuels

  • Cellulosic ethanol cost
  • Life cycle sustainability of biofuels
  • Fuels infrastructure, including Codes/Standards
  • Demand and utilization, including intermediate blends

BARRIERS

Reducing Energy Demand of Buildings, Vehicles, and Industry

  • Coordinated implementation of model building codes
  • Market does not value efficiency
  • Cost of energy efficient technologies
  • Performance and reliability of new technologies

BARRIERS

Getting to “Speed and Scale” –Key Challenges

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

harvesting past investments first generation technology
Harvesting Past InvestmentsFirst Generation Technology

U.S. Renewable Electricity Installed Nameplate Capacity

Sources: Chalk, AWEA, IEA, NREL, EIA, GEA

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

technology innovation challenges remain the next generation
Technology Innovation Challenges RemainThe Next Generation
  • Wind Turbines
    • Improve energy capture by 30%
    • Decrease costs by 25%
  • Biofuels
    • New feedstocks
    • Integrated biorefineries
  • Solar Systems
    • Improved performance through, new materials, lower cost manufacturing processes, concentration
    • Nanostructures
  • Zero Energy Buildings
    • Building systems integration
    • Computerized building energy optimization tools

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

achieving the potential requires a balanced portfolio
Achieving the Potential RequiresA Balanced Portfolio

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

slide7

Translational Science is Key to Speed and Scale

Systems Biology

Photoconversion

Computational

Science

Connecting new discoveries, via applied research,

to the marketplace

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

market growth is enabled by progressive public policy
Market Growth is Enabled by Progressive Public Policy

JAPAN

CALIFORNIA

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

state policy framework
State Policy Framework

Renewable Portfolio Standards

Source: DSIRE database, March 2008

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

technology development programs
Technology Development Programs

NREL R&D Portfolio

  • Renewable Resources
  • Wind and water
  • Solar
  • Biomass
  • Geothermal
  • Efficient Energy Use
  • Vehicle Technologies
  • Building Technologies
  • Industrial Technologies
  • Energy Delivery and Storage
  • Electricity Transmission and Distribution
  • Alternative Fuels
  • Hydrogen Delivery and Storage

Foundational Science and Advanced Analytics

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

what makes nrel unique
What Makes NREL Unique?

Only national laboratory dedicated to renewable energy and energy efficiency R&D

Collaboration with industry and university partners is a hallmark

Ability to link scientific discovery and product development to accelerate commercialization

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

enhanced nrel leadership the alliance for sustainable energy approach
Enhanced NREL LeadershipThe “Alliance for Sustainable Energy” Approach

Midwest Research Institute, Battelle, Colorado School of Mines, Colorado State University, University of Colorado at Boulder, Stanford University, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

managing the lab to market interface
Managing the Lab-to-Market Interface
  • Partner with industry, universities, international community and state/local governments to deploy clean energy solutions
    • Hawaii training, DuPont CRADA, Xcel/SolarTAC
  • Contribute timely and definitive analyses on technology, policy, and market issues that impact commercialization
  • Provide investment community with credible information (industry growth forums)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

looking to the future nrel s energy systems integration facility esif
Looking to the Future: NREL’s Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF)

130,000 sq ft. multi-story building with high-bay and low-bay laboratories and offices

Unique capability for testing and analysis to enable economic, reliable integration of renewable electricity, fuels, storage, and efficiency technologies with existing utility and fuels infrastructure

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

slide15

NREL FY2008 Program Portfolio

Estimated $304 Million

Weatherization $4M

Facilities and Infrastructure $83.2

Solar $72M

Transmission and Distribution $1.5M

WFO $14.1M

Bioenergy $30M

Other DOE $11.5M

Wind $31.6M

Geothermal $4.1M

Basic Sciences $12.7M

FEMP $3.1M

Vehicle Technologies $12.2

Buildings $9.7M

Hydrogen $15M

Updated March 2008

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

slide16

NREL Funding and Staffing

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

slide17
Wind

Long Term Potential

  • 20% of the nation’s electricity supply
  • Today’s Status in U.S.
  • 16,850 MW installed at end of 2007
  • Cost 6-9¢/kWh at good wind sites*
  • DOE Cost Goals
  • 3.6¢/kWh, onshore at low wind sites by 2012
  • 7¢/kWh, offshore in shallow water by 2014

* With no Production Tax Credit

Updated March 12, 2008

Source: U.S. Department of Energy, American Wind Energy Association

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

slide18
Wind
  • NREL Research Thrusts
  • Improved performance and reliability
  • Advanced rotor development
  • Utility grid integration

Source: Megavind Report Denmark’s future as leading centre of competence within the field of wind power

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

western wind resource
Western Wind Resource

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

solar photovoltaics and concentrating solar power
Solar – Photovoltaics and Concentrating Solar Power
  • Status in U.S.
  • PV
  • 824 MW installed capacity
  • Cost 18-23¢/kWh
  • CSP
  • 419 MW installed capacity
  • Cost 12¢/kWh
  • Potential:
  • PV
  • 11-18¢/kWh by 2010
  • 5-10 ¢/kWh by 2015
  • CSP
  • 8.5 ¢/kWh by 2010
  • 6 ¢/kWh by 2015

Source: U.S. Department of Energy, IEA

Updated January 28, 2008

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

slide21

CSP

    • Low cost high performance storage for baseload markets
    • Advanced absorbers, reflectors, and heat transfer fluids
    • Next generation solar concentrators

NREL Research Thrusts

PV

  • Higher performance cells/modules
  • New nanomaterials applications
  • Advanced manufacturing techniques

8.22-megawatt Alamosa, Colo., PV solar plant

western solar resource
Western Solar Resource

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

buildings
Buildings
  • Status U.S. Buildings:
  • 39% of primary energy
  • 71% of electricity
  • 38% of carbon emissions
  • DOE Goal:
  • Cost effective, marketable zero energy buildings by 2025
  • Value of energy savings exceeds cost of energy features on a cash flow basis
  • NREL Research Thrusts
  • Whole building systems integration of efficiency and renewable features
  • Computerized building energy optimization tools
  • Building integrated PV

April 10, 2008

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

colorado biomass resource
Colorado Biomass Resource

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

biofuels
Biofuels

Current Biofuels Status in U.S.

  • Biodiesel – 165 companies; 1.85 billion gallons/yr capacity1
  • Corn ethanol
      • 134 commercial plants2
      • 7.2 billion gal/yr. capacity2
      • Additional 6.2 billion gal/yr planned or under construction
  • Cellulosic ethanol (current technology)
      • Projected commercial cost ~$3.50/gge

Key DOE Goals

  • 2012 goal: cellulosic ethanol $1.31/ETOH gallon or ~$1.96/gge
  • 2022 goal: 36B gal Renewable Fuel; 21B gal “Advanced Renewable Fuel”– 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act
  • 2030 goal: 60 billion gal ethanol (30% of 2004 gasoline)

NREL Research Thrusts

  • The biorefinery and cellulosic ethanol
  • Solutions to under-utilized waste residues
  • Energy crops

Updated February 2008

Sources: 1- National Biodiesel Board

2 - Renewable Fuels Association, all other information based on DOE and USDA sources

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

pathways to biofuels
Pathways to Biofuels

Transportation Fuels

Ethanol & Mixed Alcohols

Diesel*

Methanol

Gasoline*

Diesel*

Gasoline* & Diesel*

Diesel*

Gasoline*

Hydrogen

Ethanol, Butanol, Hydrocarbons

BiodieselGreen diesel

Feedstocks

LignocellulosicBiomass (wood, agri, waste, grasses, etc.)

Sugar/Starch Crops(corn, sugar cane, etc.)

Natural Oils(plants, algae)

Intermediates

Syn Gas

Bio-Oils

Lignin

Sugars

Fermentation

Catalytic synthesis

FT synthesis

Gasification

MeOH synthesis

Pyrolysis & Liquefaction

MTG

HydroCracking/Treating

Ag residues,

(stover, bagasse)

Catalytic upgrading

Pretreatment & Hydrolysis

APP

Catalytic pyrolysis

Hydrolysis

APR

Fermentation

Transesterification

Hydrodeoxygenation

* Blending Products

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

plug in hybrid electric vehicles phev
Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV)
  • Key Challenges
  • Energy storage – life and cost
  • Utility impacts
  • Vehicle cost
  • Recharging locations
  • Tailpipe emissions/cold starts
  • Cabin heating/cooling
  • ~33% put cars in garage
  • Status:
  • PHEV-only conversion vehicles available
  • OEMS building prototypes
  • NREL PHEV Test Bed
  • NREL Research Thrusts
  • Energy storage
  • Advanced power electronics
  • Vehicle ancillary loads reduction
  • Vehicle thermal management
  • Utility interconnection
  • Vehicle-to-grid

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

an integrated approach is required
An Integrated Approach is Required

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

slide29

Renewable Energy:Enabling Economic Growth in Colorado

  • Plentiful resources
  • Centers of excellence
  • Supportive regulatory and business environment

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

slide30

Visit us online at www.nrel.gov

Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute • Battelle

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future