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European Union Road Federation (ERF) Infrastructure safety needs and policies. ERF is a signatory of the European Road Safety Charter associating civil society to Europe’s goal of halving the number of road deaths by 2010. “The Voice of the European Road”.

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Presentation Transcript
slide1
European Union Road Federation

(ERF)

Infrastructure safety needs and policies

ERF is a signatory of the European Road Safety Charter associating civil society to Europe’s goal of halving the number of road deaths by 2010

International Road Federation – Brussels Programme Centre Page 1

the voice of the european road
“The Voice of the European Road”
  • ERF is a platform for dialogue and research at the service of the European road community.
  • ERF initiates and supports scientific studies and publications aimed at improving the knowledge of the European road system.
  • ERF gives the road community a consistent and united voice in all transport areas :
    • Socio-economic contribution of roads to society
    • Sustainable road construction
    • Infrastructure financing
    • Intelligent roads
    • Safer road engineering

International Road Federation – Brussels Programme Centre Page 2

slide3

The Problem

International Road Federation – Brussels Programme Centre Page 3

the european context 1 4
The European Context (1/4)
  • Road safety levels in Europe remain preoccupying
    • EU-25: 41,500 deaths, 2 000 000 road injuries and countless “near misses” every year
    • General trend show improvement in EU-15 but stabilisation in 10 new Member States,
    • Performance varies considerably from one Member States to another,
    • A structurally ageing population with lower cognitive abilities (night vision, etc.) and a higher fatality risk in the event of an accident.

 Road Safety remains a major societal issue in Europe

International Road Federation – Brussels Programme Centre Page 4

the european context 2 4
The European Context (2/4)

Evolution of fatalities in EU-25

International Road Federation – Brussels Programme Centre Page 5

the european context 3 4
The European Context (3/4)

Fatalities by million vehicles

International Road Federation – Brussels Programme Centre Page 6

the european context 4 4
The European Context (4/4)

Old & New Member States performances

International Road Federation – Brussels Programme Centre Page 7

understanding the figures 1 4
Understanding the figures (1/4)
  • Old “solve the driver” approach
  • But:
    • with comparable speed & blood alcohol limits, road death ratio between European countries is 1:4,
    • Single lane roads are up to four times as dangerous as dual carriageways,
    • a third of road deaths are attributable to single-vehicle crashes with a roadside obstacle

 Official accident statistics significantly understate the importance of the road as a contributing factor

International Road Federation – Brussels Programme Centre Page 8

understanding the figures 2 4
Understanding the figures (2/4)

Case study

The driver

Young, inexperienced, driving fast

The car

Worn rear tires

The road

Wet, no protective devices

International Road Federation – Brussels Programme Centre Page 9

understanding the figures 3 4
Understanding the figures (3/4)

Driving mistakes will remain a fact of life

Necessary, but important phase-in time

Immediate effect!

How can accidents be avoided ?

  • Acting on the driver
    • More training, graduate licenses
  • Acting on the car
    • speed limitation devices, improved stability programmes
  • Acting on the road
    • passive safety devices, porous road surfacing, driver information (VMS, road signs, etc.)

International Road Federation – Brussels Programme Centre Page 10

understanding the figures 4 4
Understanding the figures (4/4)

What we still find on European roads:

  • Unprotected trees and street furniture
  • Poorly placed pedestrian crossings
  • Road surface defects
  • Obstructed driver visibility
  • Inadequate protective devices
  • Road signs and markings that are invisible in poor visibility conditions
  • No consideration for vulnerable road users

International Road Federation – Brussels Programme Centre Page 11

a shared responsibility 1 3
A shared responsibility (1/3)
  • Article 71: measures to improve road safety integrated within CTP.
  • Article 152: public health and consumer protection issues.
  • Article 155: technical harmonisation and interoperability of the Trans European Network.

The EU has legal obligations arising from the Treaty…

  • The 2003 RSAP translates these obligations into an action plan

International Road Federation – Brussels Programme Centre Page 12

a shared responsibility 2 3
A shared responsibility (2/3)

…but shares the overall responsibility for road safety

International Road Federation – Brussels Programme Centre Page 13

a shared responsibility 3 3
A shared responsibility (3/3)

…and must therefore rely on a panel of measures.

  • Direct legislation (eg. Tunnel Safety Directive)
  • Data collection, comparison and analysis of best practices (Report on infrastructure safety practices)
  • Standardisation (CEN/TC226 and TC227)
  • Financial support to R&D activities (RISER, RANKERS)
  • Consumer information programmes (EuroRAP)
  • Fiscal incentives (none tested yet)
  • Subsidiarity remains a convenient excuse for some MS

International Road Federation – Brussels Programme Centre Page 14

the infrastructure safety directive 1 8
The Infrastructure Safety Directive (1/8)

Europe’s most ambitious legislation is still to come

  • Framework legislation on road infrastructure management applicable to the TEN
  • Provides guidance to ensure safety is integrated at all stages of road design, construction and management
  • Who will it affect ?
    • Road authorities: safety procedures integrated in all phases of road planning, design, construction and operation
    • Road engineers: compulsory qualifications, best practice exchanges
    • Motorists: introduction of black spots signposts
  • 1,300 lives could be saved every year

International Road Federation – Brussels Programme Centre Page 15

the infrastructure safety directive 2 8
The Infrastructure Safety Directive (2/8)
  • Components of the Directive

Supporting

measures

Safe Road Management

Accidentology

Cost-benefit

Research

Training

Best practices

Reactive Strategies

Preventive Strategies

High accident risk road management

Network Safety Management

Impact assessments

Road safety audits

Safety Inspections

International Road Federation – Brussels Programme Centre Page 16

the infrastructure safety directive 3 8
The Infrastructure Safety Directive (3/8)
  • Preventive strategies:
  • For new roads and major changes of operation: Safety Impact Assessment.
  • At pre-opening stage: Safety Audits.
  • As part of regular road maintenance: Safety Inspections.
  • Audit report:
  • delivers an idenpendent evaluation of the road’s accident potential
  • identifies any potential safety deficiencies
  • makes recommendations to changes in the design
  • 30% of problems identified during an audit will occur within 5 years unless the recommendations are implemented.

International Road Federation – Brussels Programme Centre Page 17

the infrastructure safety directive 4 8
The Infrastructure Safety Directive (4/8)

Reactive strategies:

  • High accident risk roads are road sections with an increased probability that a serious or fatal accident will occur in relation to traffic volume.
  • Network Safety Management targets remedial measures to portions of the road network where accident cost reduction potential is the highest
  • Safety gains will be maximum during first years of mass eradication programmes. In parallel, driver should be informed by means of a sign detailing the safety record of the section and suggesting concrete actions to the motorists.
  • Signposting of high accident risk roads can lead to 25% reduction in injury accidents

International Road Federation – Brussels Programme Centre Page 18

the infrastructure safety directive 5 8
The Infrastructure Safety Directive (5/8)

Supporting Measures:

  • Detailed accident reports to detect recurrent patterns
  • Best practice exchange to share engineering measures known for their cost effectiveness (“before and after” case studies).
  • Systematic training courses for auditors leading to a certificate recognised throughout the EU.
  • Research programmes into cutting-edge countermeasures
  • Economic evaluation of remedial measures based on Cost-benefit assessment. E.g:
    • 353% for anti-skid surfacing
    • 820% for markings and signs
    • 134% for mini-roundabouts
    • 198% for traffic calming measures

Source: Institute of Civil Engineers, UK

International Road Federation – Brussels Programme Centre Page 19

the infrastructure safety directive 6 8
The Infrastructure Safety Directive (6/8)

Status of the Directive :

  • 2001: First measures targeted at “Black Spots” announced in White Paper
  • 2004: L. De Palacio confirms preparation of a framework directive under way
  • April 2006 European Commission opens public consultation around three scenarios:
    • No change
    • Technical and organisation requirements fixed at European level
    • Technical and organisation requirements left to MS
  • 4 October 2006: proposal to be formally submitted to European Parliament and Council

International Road Federation – Brussels Programme Centre Page 20

the infrastructure safety directive 7 8
The Infrastructure Safety Directive (7/8)

Reactions received :

  • “We strongly suggest that guidelines are issued to facilitate the procedures of decision making and design of infrastructure and that an active exchange on best practices will be initiated”.Dutch Road Directorate
  • “Our preference would be for an approach that minimised the level of

prescription, allowing member states freedom to develop or draw upon

appropriate procedures that best suited their needs” UK DfT

  • “It is essential for such a Directive that it is flexible in the sense that it must not prohibit any member state for using already well working procedures”. DK Road Directorate

International Road Federation – Brussels Programme Centre Page 21

the infrastructure safety directive 8 8
The Infrastructure Safety Directive (8/8)

Joint statement released on 22 May 2006

“European road safety targets set in 2001 will not be met unless road authorities rise up to the challenge of absorbing increasing road traffic while offering safer driving conditions to all road users. We the undersigned organisations call for the swift release of a Directive on Safe Road Management as a part of a new “safety deal” linking in a realistic way all the actors of the safety chain”.

Signatory Organisations

International Road Federation – Brussels Programme Centre Page 22

online resources
Online resources:
  • Designing and keeping roadsides safe
  • “Better road infrastructure, saving your life”
  • Road Restraint Systems : Passive safety where it matters
  • Position Paper on the 3rd European Road Safety Action Programme
  • Position Paper on the Tunnel Safety Directive
  • Road Marking Requirements for Europe
  • The Improvement of Signing in Europe
  • Guidelines to Black Spot Management
  • Engineering Safer Roads (Bi-monthly newsletter)

All publications are available at http://www.erf.be/

International Road Federation – Brussels Programme Centre Page 23

thank you for your attention
Thank You For Your Attention
  • European Union
  • Road Federation (ERF)
  • Avenue Louise, 113
  • B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)
  • Tel: + (32) 2 644 58 77
  • Fax: + (32) 2 647 59 34
  • E-mail:info@erf.be
  • http://www.erf.be

International Road Federation – Brussels Programme Centre Page 24