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Causes of and a Solution to Global Warming. Mark Z. Jacobson Atmosphere/Energy Program Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering Stanford University Intensive English and Academic Orientation Program Stanford University, July 24, 2007.

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Causes of and a Solution to Global Warming


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    1. Causes of and a Solution to Global Warming Mark Z. Jacobson Atmosphere/Energy Program Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering Stanford University Intensive English and Academic Orientation Program Stanford University, July 24, 2007

    2. Fractal Soot Agglomerates (Arrows) Coated by Ammonium Sulfate Pósfai et al. (1999)

    3. w-w/o AGHG+AAP+US 10-yr Modeled Temperature Differences w-w/o AGHG w-w/o ff. soot w-w/o AAP

    4. Modeled v. Measured Temperature Diffs. Modeled 1750 to 2005 (simulation not complete) Many cool areas will warm in 5-10 simulation years Measured 1930 to 2005 (Brohan et al.)

    5. Global Temperature Changes Due to Eliminating Anthropogenic CO2, CH4, f.f. BC+OM Emission Cooling (K) after eliminating anthropogenic emission

    6. Causal Effect of CO2 on Mortality Global-regional nested simulations demonstrate that CO2 alone increases temperature, water vapor, ozone, and PM  Temperature  Water vapor  Ozone U.S. ozone deaths/yr per 1 K +500 (190-575) U.S. PM2.5 death/yr per 1 K +640 (160-1280) U.S. Total deaths/yr per 1K +1140 (350-1855) World Total deaths/yr per 1K +24,000 (7200-37,000)

    7. Global Power Demand and Clean Renewable Supply TW Global overall power demand9.4-13.6 Potential renewable availability Solar over land 1700 Land-wind at 80 m and > 6.9 m/s 72a, 80b Geothermal 9.5b Hydroelectric 6.5b Wave 5b Tidal 3.7b aArcher and Jacobson, 2005; bStacey and Davis, 2006

    8. Installed Wind Capacity Worldwide Country 2005 (MW) 2006 (MW) Germany 18,428 20,261 Spain 10,027 11,615 U.S. 9,149 11,603 India 4,430 6,270 Denmark 3,122 3,136 World 59,084 74,223 (900 offshore) Individual turbine ≈ 0.4 MW --> ≈ 150,000 turbines

    9. Area to Power 100% of U.S. Onroad Vehicles Solar-battery Wind-battery ground contact Wind-battery turbine spacing Cellulosic ethanol Corn ethanol Map: www.fotw.net

    10. Mean 80-m Wind Speed in North America Archer and Jacobson (2005)www.stanford.edu/group/efmh/winds/

    11. Percent of Land+Near Shore Stations With Annual Wind Speeds > 6.9 m/s at 80 m Europe 14.2 North America 19.0 United States over land 15.0 United States over land+near shore 17.0 South America 9.7 Oceania 21.2 Africa 4.6 Asia 2.7 Antarctica 60 Global over land 13 Archer and Jacobson (2005)

    12. Aggregate Wind Power (MW) From 81% ofSpain’s Grid Versus Time of Day, Oct. 26, 2005

    13. Birds and Wind U.S. bird deaths from current wind turbines 10,000-40,000/yr (!) U.S. bird deaths from communication towers: 50 million/yr (!) Worldwide bird deaths from avian flu: 200 million/yr (%) Est. bird deaths with 2,500,000 turbines worldwide: 2.5-10 million/yr Premature U.S. deaths fossil-/biofuel pollution: 50,000/yr (*) The effect of wind turbines on birds will be small relative to the benefit of reducing fossil-biofuels on human and animal illness. (!) Bird Conservancy (April 2006); (%) San Jose Mercury News (April 2006) (*) McCubbin and Delucchi (1999)

    14. Land Area For 50% of US Energy From Wind Turbine area touching ground Spacing between turbines Map: www.fotw.net

    15. Alternatively, Water Area For 50% of US Energy From Wind Spacing between turbines Map: www.fotw.net

    16. Dvorak et al. (2006)

    17. Eureka Wind Park Example (Preliminary) <20 m deep <50 m deep 529 REpower5.0M turbines Dvorak et al. (2007) 2645 MW capacity (529 5 MW turbines), capacity factor of 42% Yields 5.9 TWh/yr (8.2% of California’s carbon electricity) Requires about 28 km (18 mi) or 2.1% of California’s 840 mi coast.

    18. Summary Global warming will hasten as aerosol pollution decreases. CO2 increases air pollution mortality due to its effect on temperature, water vapor, and atmospheric stability, which increase ozone and particulate matter in urban areas. 80% reductions in current emissions are needed to stabilize CO2. Corn ethanol cannot practically reduce CO2 in the U.S. by more than 0.07-0.2%; cellulosic ethanol cannot reduce CO2 by more than 1.3-4%, based on current understanding. FF soot appears to cause about 13% (0.24 K) of the 1.9 K increase in temperatures due to AGHG+FF soot+urban surfaces. Its complete removal may eliminate about 30% of the net global warming (0.8 K) to date.

    19. Summary Wind-battery electric vehicles can reduce U.S. CO2 by 25.5%; solar-battery electric vehicles can reduce it by 23.4% Wind turbines require 30 times less land than corn ethanol and 20 time less land than cellulosic ethanol for the same power. Sufficient wind and solar are available worldwide to supply all electric and nonelectric energy needs simultaneously several times over and to solve air pollution/climate problems simultaneously. More info: www.stanford.edu/group/efmh/jacobson/E85vWindSol