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MINES

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MINES

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  1. MINES

  2. Definition • It is an explosive or other material normally encased and designed to destroy or damage vehicles, air crafts • Designed to wound or kill people • It can be detonated by the action of it target, the passage of time or by controlled means

  3. The Family of Mines • Antipersonnel mines (AP mines) Weight: grams • Anti Tank mines (AT mines) Weight: kg

  4. Categorization of Land Mines • Anti-Personnel Mines • Blast • Fragmentation • Bounding Fragmentation • Directional and Anti Group Mines • Fragmentation • Anti Tank Mines • Blast

  5. Anti Personnel Blast Mines • Pressure activated, between 1 – 5kgs • Contain 75 – 200 grams of explosives • Causes traumatic amputation of limbs • Plastic or metal, difficult to see due to small size

  6. Anti Personnel Blast Mines

  7. EFFECT 2 grams of HE

  8. EFFECT 200 grams of HE 200 grams of HE

  9. AP – Directional Fragmentation Mine

  10. Directional and Anti Group Mines • Generally fragmentation • Surface or sub-surface • Trip-wire or command operated • Lethal radius of 50+m • Commonly used in conjunction with buried AP mines

  11. Anti Tank Blast Mines

  12. Anti Tank Mines • Pressure activated fuse of 70-200+kg • Contain between 5-10kg of explosives • Normally buried, often with anti-lift devices and in conjunction with AP mines • Metal or plastic TM - 62

  13. EFFECT Anti Tank mine on minibus and light military vehicles.

  14. Mine Area Recognition • Note: • Mined Areas are often not marked • Marking is theexception, not the rule !!! • Because of this, it is important to recognise areas that might be at risk from mines / UXO

  15. Where Mines Are Found • Evacuated buildings/houses • Where fighting has occurred • Strategic & Military Areas • Unattended fields/heavy vegetation • Near military camps or positions • Along or beside foot paths • Along roadways • Culverts and bridges • Doorways of houses • Wells and water access points • Ditches or hiding places • Stream crossing points

  16. Minefield Indicators • Area clearly marked as a mine field • Parts of mines (unknown plastic and metal) • Barb wire (wires) • Empty packages of mines • Signs of confrontation lines • Check points and roadblocks • Destroyed/abandoned military equipment • Craters of mines • Injuries to local population • Dead animals • Suspicious items

  17. Danger Signs and Indications: Red and white painted stones Markings International signs: • Sign posts: These are normally bright red, square or triangular in shape 25cm x 25cm in size and have a skull and cross bones with the words“DANGER MINES”written in local languages • Painted rocks • Local markings • Piles of rocks • Crossed sticks • Knotted grass • Flags • Plastic bags hanging from trees

  18. Official Signs

  19. Unconventional Signs

  20. Actions on Finding YourselfIn a Mined Area10 minutes Exercise

  21. Stop! Warn! Radio! Wait!

  22. STOP! M I N E D Movement: Stop. Remain Calm.Stay still and do not move your feet. Inform: Inform and warn people around you. Call for help, but keep others away. Note: Note the area. What else can you see: mines, tripwires, mine signs? Evaluate: Evaluate your course of action. Be prepared to take control of the situation. Do not: Do not move, if there is no safe area or if you can’t reach it, Wait for help to arrive.

  23. Who: UNDSS (Via Radio) Local Authorities UNMACA Agency Local Demining Agency Reporting Incidents

  24. QUESTIONS?