chapter 5 the western crossroads n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Chapter 5 THE WESTERN CROSSROADS PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Chapter 5 THE WESTERN CROSSROADS

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 24

Chapter 5 THE WESTERN CROSSROADS - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 129 Views
  • Uploaded on

Chapter 5 THE WESTERN CROSSROADS. Section 1: War in the West Section 2: Western Farmers Section 3: The Cattle Boom Section 4: The Mining Boom. Section 1: War in the West. Objectives:. Why did the U.S. government create the American Indian reservation system?

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Chapter 5 THE WESTERN CROSSROADS' - erica


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
chapter 5 the western crossroads

Chapter 5THE WESTERN CROSSROADS

Section 1: War in the West

Section 2: Western Farmers

Section 3: The Cattle Boom

Section 4: The Mining Boom

objectives

Section 1: War in the West

Objectives:
  • Why did the U.S. government create the American Indian reservation system?
  • What were the sources of conflict between the Plains Indians and the U.S. government?
  • How did Chief Joseph, Geronimo, and Sarah Winnemucca respond to whites’ treatment of American Indians?
  • How did the U.S. government try to assimilate American Indians?
the reservation system

Section 1: War in the West

The reservation system
  • created to serve desire for farmland and gold
  • gave government control of American Indians
  • provided opportunity for assimilation of American Indians
the plains indians and the u s government

Section 1: War in the West

The Plains Indians and the U.S. government
  • conflicts over land and reservations
  • conflicts over broken promises and treaties
  • conflicts over the Ghost Dance
chief joseph s response

Section 1: War in the West

Chief Joseph’s response
  • agreed to move tribe to a reservation
  • fled from the U.S. Army and eventually surrendered
geronimo s response

Section 1: War in the West

Geronimo’s response
  • fled reservation with his tribe; raided settlements
  • eventually surrendered
sarah winnemucca s response

Section 1: War in the West

Sarah Winnemucca’s response
  • called attention to problems
  • made speeches; participated in political activities
assimilation attempts

Section 1: War in the West

Assimilation attempts
  • establishment of reservations
  • creation of Indian schools
  • passage of the Dawes Act
objectives1

Section 2: Western Farmers

Objectives:
  • How did the U.S. government promote economic development in the West?
  • Why did people migrate west?
  • How did the environment influence farming practices and daily life in the West?
  • What difficulties did farm families face on the Great Plains?
promotion of economic development

Section 2: Western Farmers

Promotion of economic development
  • Homestead Act permitted any citizen or intended citizen to have 160 acres of land.
  • Pacific Railway Act gave lands to railroad companies to develop the transcontinental railroad.
  • Morrill Act provided more than 17 million acres of land whose sale was to finance agricultural and engineering colleges.
migration west

Section 2: Western Farmers

Migration west
  • White Americans sought cheaper lands or wanted to make a new start.
  • African Americans wanted to escape persecution in the South.
  • Scandinavians had “America Fever.”
  • Irish moved west after building railroads.
  • Russian Mennonites moved after Russian czar ended their exemption from military service.
  • Chinese came during Gold Rush and turned to farming.
environmental influence

Section 2: Western Farmers

Environmentalinfluence
  • Lack of water and strong winds led to dry farming and irrigation.
  • Lack of trees led to use of buffalo manure as fuel and building material.
  • Harsh winters led to use of new varieties of wheat that withstood the weather.
difficulties for farm families

Section 2: Western Farmers

Difficulties for farm families
  • poor housing
  • blizzards and cold weather
  • droughts
  • insects
  • prairie fires
  • backbreaking work
objectives2

Section 3: The Cattle Boom

Objectives:
  • How did cattle and sheep ranching develop in the West?
  • What was life like for cowboys and residents of cattle towns?
  • What were ranches like?
  • Why did the cattle boom on the open range end?
development of cattle ranching

Section 3: The Cattle Boom

Development of cattle ranching
  • introduction of the Texas longhorn
  • expansion of eastern beef market
development of sheep ranching

Section 3: The Cattle Boom

Development of sheep ranching
  • introduced by Spanish
  • also done by American Indians
  • market expansion sparked by Gold Rush
cowboy life

Section 3: The Cattle Boom

Cowboy life
  • demanding working conditions
  • isolation
  • trail drives
town life

Section 3: The Cattle Boom

Town life
  • busy from spring to fall from cattle drives
  • businesses attracted by the money that cowboys received at end of drive
  • families followed businesses
ranches

Section 3: The Cattle Boom

Ranches
  • hard work for both genders
  • lonely
  • centered around roundup
end of the cattle boom

Section 3: The Cattle Boom

End of the cattle boom
  • cattle glut
  • invention of barbed wire
  • depletion of grass
  • bad weather
objectives3

Section 4: The Mining Boom

Objectives:
  • What role did mining play in bringing more people west?
  • How did the arrival of families change life in mining camps?
  • Why did large companies take over most mining operations, and how did this change the lives of miners?
role of mining

Section 4: The Mining Boom

Role of mining

Mining attracted people to the West by presenting the possibility of great wealth.

arrival of families

Section 4: The Mining Boom

Arrival of families
  • Families brought stability and transformed temporary towns into permanent ones.
  • Families brought law and order.
  • Families established churches, newspapers, schools, and cultural establishments.
takeover by large companies

Section 4: The Mining Boom

Takeover by large companies
  • It was expensive to mine the deep, less accessible deposits.
  • Technology rather than luck required to locate deposits.
  • Miners became laborers for corporations rather than self-employed individuals.
  • Working conditions in mines were dangerous.
  • Some miners formed unions to get better wages and working conditions.