atlantic states marine fisheries commission n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
ATLANTIC STATES MARINE FISHERIES COMMISSION PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
ATLANTIC STATES MARINE FISHERIES COMMISSION

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 42

ATLANTIC STATES MARINE FISHERIES COMMISSION - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 98 Views
  • Uploaded on

ATLANTIC STATES MARINE FISHERIES COMMISSION. Our Fishery Management Plan for American Eel. ASMFC’s interest in Eel due to decline in abundance. Recently, various indicators of abundance show a decrease (1980s to 1990s)

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'ATLANTIC STATES MARINE FISHERIES COMMISSION' - eric-barber


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
atlantic states marine fisheries commission

ATLANTIC STATES MARINE FISHERIES COMMISSION

Our Fishery Management Plan

for

American Eel

asmfc s interest in eel due to decline in abundance
ASMFC’s interest in Eel due to decline in abundance
  • Recently, various indicators of abundance show a decrease (1980s to 1990s)
  • Historically eel were very abundant - possibly providing 25 to 50% of total fish biomass in coastal streams (Smith and Saunders 1955; Ogden 1970)
process through which a species is considered for management by the asmfc
Process through which a species is considered for management by the ASMFC
  • Interjurisdictional species found in the Atlantic coastal area
  • Significant decrease in abundance
  • Decrease in average age and size
  • Calculated mortality rate high
  • Economic concerns
process for fmp
Process for FMP
  • States identify their interest - Management Board formed
  • Technical Committee established
  • Plan Development Team formed
    • Draft plan written, reviewed/input by
      • public hearings
      • resource experts
      • habitat managers
      • law enforcement
      • Draft plan out for public hearings
summary of resource concern
Summary of Resource Concern
  • Stock abundance recently decreasing
  • States identifying economic losses
  • Concern expressed at Public Hearings that habitat impairments need to be identified
outcome draft fmp
OUTCOME - DRAFT FMP
  • Through its preparation we learned that stock assessment
    • fishery dependent data are weak
    • fishery independent data also weak
  • Habitat quantity has been restricted
  • Habitat quality was degraded but is improving
generic mission statement for most governmental agencies
Generic “mission” statement for most governmental agencies

Provide for healthy, diverse, and productive fish community(ies) based self-sustaining native populations, occupying historic ranges, fulfilling their ecosystem functions, and allowing for a sustainable harvest.

external p roblems and challenges
External Problems and Challenges
  • Improved team approach with “partners”
    • Shared understanding of the issues
    • Shared goals and objectives
  • Standardization of data
  • Data sharing (not selling) in a timely fashion
an exciting time for resource management
An Exciting Time for Resource Management
  • Ecosystem approach has strong science support
  • New tools allow better data collection and data management (GPS, GIS)
  • All agencies are being moved towards the ecosystem approach
eel have a unique life history
Eel have a unique life history
  • Catadromous - therefore up and down stream passage is important
  • Panmictic - therefore dealing with one population throughout its range
  • Range from Labrador to Panama, however, main concentration in Mid-Atlantic region
the following habitat data were compiled for fws by w d n busch s j lary and c m castiglione 1998
The following habitat data were compiled for FWS by W.D.N.Busch, S.J. Lary, and C.M. Castiglione (1998)
  • USEPA - 1:100,000 hydrology database for entire east coast (Reach Files Version 3 (rf3-alpha).
  • USACOE - National Inventory of Dams Database(1995-96 CD).
  • USGS - Daily streamflow for the entire east coast.
assumptions in addressing eel habitat
Assumptionsin addressing eel habitat
  • Glass eel (elvers) inhabit tidal salt, mixed and freshwaters (Tesch 1977)
  • Yellow eel (juvenile) inhabit rivers and impoundments (Hardy 1978; Fahay 1978)
  • Silver eel (maturing adults/adults) inhabit rivers and impoundments until sexually mature for return to the ocean (Wenner 1973; Facey and Van Den Avyle 1987)
historic or potential habitats
Historic or Potential Habitats

Region Stream LengthEstuary Area

(km) Fresh Mixed Seawater

(km2)

South Atlantic 2460081839 15092 4371

Mid Atlantic 1993141211 18620 12340

North Atlantic 11148255 174 7625

Great Lakes/St. Law. 39934ND ND ND

TOTAL 5967383105 33886 24336

assumptions for this preliminary attempt to quantify habitat lost to eel
Assumptionsfor this preliminary attempt to quantify habitat lost to eel
  • Upstream - dams restrict or prevent eel movement
  • Locks for navigation do not provide complete access
  • Downstream survival is also critical
the watersheds with dams
The Watersheds with Dams

Est. Avg. Annual water flow = 44,000 cfs

north atlantic region
North Atlantic Region:

HUC# Descriptive Name Historic Current % lost # dams

101 St. John River 11335 1 99 37

102 Penobscot R. basin 15245 207 99 75

103 Kenebec R. basin 9186 208 98 97

104 Androscoggin R. basin 4467 195 96 95

105 Maine Coastal Area 10884 5166 53 98

106 Saco Area 9414 1685 82 212

107 Merrimack R. basin 11006 10 99 533

108 Connecticut R. basin 20874 99 99 941

109 Mass.-Rode Isl. Area 7886 1589 80 708

110 Connecticut Area 10335 1188 89 713

111 St. Francois River 849 1 99 13

the watersheds with dams1
The Watersheds with Dams

Est. Avg. Annual water flow = 23,000 cfs

mid atlantic region
Mid Atlantic Region

HUC# Descriptive Name Historic Current % lost # dams

201 Richelieu L.Champl. 9126 1 99 235

202 Upper Hudson 22389 1 99 660

203 Lower Hudson 7781 1431 82 519

204 Delaware C. Area 26934 5148 81 1068

205 Susquehanna basin 52331 251 99 684

206 Upper Chesapeake 14884 8862 40 157

207 Potomac R. basin 28140 3281 88 443

208 Lower Chesapeake 199314 24533 88 884

the watersheds with dams2
The Watersheds with Dams

Est. Annual Avg. water flow = 44,000 cfs

south atlantic region
South Atlantic Region

HUC# Descriptive Name Historic Current % lost # dams

301 Chowan-Roanoke D. 36775 3632 90 371

302 Neuse-Pamlico D. 23324 12452 47 445

303 Cape Fear C. Drain. 20471 5990 71 626

304 Pee Dee Coastal D. 35880 6139 83 1034

305 Edisto-Santee C.D. 41504 7003 83 1942

306 Ogeechee-Savannah 34604 4508 87 1028

307 Altamaha-St. Marys 37172 4673 87 1353

308 St. Johns Coastal D. 8234 6582 20 40

309 Southern Florida C.D. 8044 4893 39 105

the watersheds with dams3
The Watersheds with Dams

Est. Avg. annual water flow = 300,000 cfs

great lakes st lawrence region
Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Region

HUC# Descriptive Name Historic Current % lost # dams

412 Niagara R/E. Erie 40 0 100 1 4

413 SW Lake Ontario 7,295 0 100 72

414 SE Lake Ontario 14,152 0 100 169

415 L.Ontario/St. Lawren. 18,447 0 100 233

1Lost due to dams on the St. Lawrence River

summary of findings types and numbers of dams by region
Summary of FindingsTypes and Numbers of Dams by Region

Region <10 ft. 10-24 25+ HydroE.

North Atlantic 448 2260 813 561

Mid Atlantic 475 2563 1603 217

South Atlantic 194 3993 2818 141

Great Lakes/St. Law. 64 238 153 181

summary of potential habitat loses worse case scenario
Summary of Potential Habitat Loses(Worse Case Scenario)

Region Stream Length (km) Per Cent

North Atlantic 101,134 91

Mid Atlantic 174,781 88

South Atlantic 190,136 77

Great Lakes/St. Law. 39,934 100

TOTAL 466,051 78

potential habitat loses worse case scenario
Potential Habitat Loses(Worse Case Scenario)

Region Stream Length Per Cent

(km)

Atlantic Coast

(Total) 466,051 78

of

596,738

downstream issues

Downstream Issues

Although many areas of eel life history are still not well documented, one fact is certain - recruitment requires parents.

slide38
Eel not only need upstream passage to reach habitat to grow and mature, but adults need safe downstream passage in order to reproduce.
slide42

ASMFC’s Management activities:1. Complete and approve FMP2. Implement fishery dependent and fishery independent assessment programs3. Update data on obstructions to up- and down-stream movements4. Update data on contaminants and effect on reproduction5. Make recommendations to minimize anthropogenic impacts6. As year-class strength data become available assess cause/effect and minimize “causes”