Download
access to healthy food in low income communities n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Access to Healthy Food in Low-Income Communities PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Access to Healthy Food in Low-Income Communities

Access to Healthy Food in Low-Income Communities

243 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

Access to Healthy Food in Low-Income Communities

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Access to Healthy Food in Low-Income Communities Tatiana Andreyeva, PhD Yale University Office of Legislative Research September 29, 2011

  2. Overview Understanding food access Promising strategies to improving food access

  3. Understanding Food Access

  4. What is Access to Healthy Food? • Easy access to affordable and nutritious food • Measured by access to a full-service supermarket/ large grocery store • Limited access if: - No supermarket within a mile and no access to a vehicle - 2.3 million of US households (2.2%)

  5. % households no car & >1mi to supermarket, CT 2006 3.6% 2.9% 1.7% 1.9% 2.3% 2.4% 2.0% 1.4% Source: ERS USDA Food Environment Atlas http://www.ers.usda.gov/foodatlas

  6. Food Deserts

  7. Food Deserts • Areas with limited access to affordable and nutritious food • 23.5 million Americans (~8%) live in food deserts - Low-income areas more than a mile from a supermarket - Low-income rural areas more than 10 miles from a supermarket

  8. % households low-income & >1mi to supermarket, CT 2006 13.8% 10.5% 4.1% 6.7% 8.5% 6.9% 5.1% 3.8% Source: ERS USDA Food Environment Atlas http://www.ers.usda.gov/foodatlas

  9. Why Food Access Important? • Has socio-demographic inequalities • Impacts diet quality, health, obesity • Affects food prices and food choices • Responds to policy changes

  10. Supermarkets in Inner Cities (Los Angeles)

  11. Number of Full-Service Supermarket Chain Stores in Inner City Los Angeles Source: Shaffer at al., 2002, Occidental College Report

  12. Barriers to Healthy Eating • Limited access to affordable and healthy food • Abundance, convenience, lower cost, massive • advertising of energy-dense low-nutrient foods • Limited time, cooking skills, awareness Our defaults are set for eating less nutritious food

  13. Promising Strategies to Improving Food Access

  14. Changes in food assistance programs • Develop new grocery stores • Improve existing small stores Economic Approaches

  15. Increase demand for healthy foods • Set standards for vendors • Increase participation in WIC and SNAP Revisions in WIC food packages Minimum stocking requirements Purchasing power in underserved areas Changes in Food Assistance Programs

  16. Revisions to WIC Food Packages • Increase in whole grains, cash vouchers • for fruit and vegetables • Reduction in dairy fat, juice • New stocking requirements for WIC stores • Implemented nationwide Oct 2009

  17. Better Food Access due to WIC Package Revisions Pre-post inventory of ~300 stores in CT, 2009-2011 • Significant increase in supply of healthy foods • in WIC stores Improved availability, variety of healthy foods, especially whole grains Some improvement in non-WIC stores • Effect larger in low-income communities Source: Andreyeva et al 2011.

  18. Effects on WIC Retailers • Stores adapted quickly to new WIC requirements • Demand determines supply

  19. Develop New Grocery Stores • Dedicated financing sources • PA Fresh Food Financing Initiative • Federal Healthy Food Financing Initiative • Better information tools • Data on business potential of low-income communities • Help with site identification and development • Zoning, tax incentives, training

  20. Improve Small Stores • Connect stores with resources • Financial and technical assistance • Financial incentives • Lower permit fees, subsidized loans • Zoning policies • Increase customer spending power • Promote SNAP and WIC participation

  21. Philadelphia Food Trust Healthy Corner Store Initiative • Pre-intervention • Average child’s store visit: • $1.07 spent • 360 calories purchased Borradaile et al, Pediatrics 2009

  22. Partnering with Stores Develop “Snackin’ Fresh” marketing Help owners stock fruit salads, bottled water Provide refrigeration units to stock produce

  23. Peaches and Greens (Detroit) http://www.centraldetroitchristian.org/Peaches_and_Greens_Vision.htm

  24. Recommendations • Conduct up-to-date needs assessment in CT • Encourage application for funding through • Healthy Food Financing Initiative • Promote participation in WIC and SNAP • Address problem of mini-food deserts

  25. Thank You! http://www.yaleruddcenter.org